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Author Topic: Discovering and sharing interesting photography locations  (Read 4414 times)
grinvalds
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« on: December 04, 2013, 07:55:39 AM »
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Hi there,
I am part of a team who developed and just now published an app http://geoscover.com for discovering and sharing interesting photography locations (no worries - it is for free). I would like to know your thoughts about such a product - would you want to use something like that? Whould you like to contribute and share your known locations to public? If not - why? Would really appreciate your input.

BR,
Kaspars
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2013, 08:53:48 AM »
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Sorry, but as a matter of principle, I would ban any such app or other forms of exchange of information regarding tripod holes.
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Slobodan

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grinvalds
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« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2013, 08:56:28 AM »
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Hi Slobodan,
could you please tell us, why exactly?
Thanks!
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bjanes
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« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2013, 09:43:55 AM »
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Hi there,
I am part of a team who developed and just now published an app http://geoscover.com for discovering and sharing interesting photography locations (no worries - it is for free). I would like to know your thoughts about such a product - would you want to use something like that? Whould you like to contribute and share your known locations to public? If not - why? Would really appreciate your input.

BR,
Kaspars

For people living in or visiting Chicago, I recommend Chris Smiths' web site and book.

Good shooting,

Bill
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2013, 10:40:01 AM »
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Those locations are interesting because they are not well known or accessible. Once everybody and his brother-in-law discovers them, the stop being interesting and become a cliché. It makes people lazy, turns them into tripod-hole hunters, instead of explorers and photographers.

But my opinion should not discourage you. For every one who shares my opinion, I am sure there are hundreds who would prefer to have such an app. Heck, even I occasionally buy a location guide.

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Slobodan

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HSakols
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« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2013, 11:12:39 AM »
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Last year someone inquired about a view of Yosemite's Horsetail Falls where there were no crowds.  The only reason it has become such a circus is because of the internet. I'm absolutely amazed at what information people will give that ends up ruining the entire photographic experience for everyone.  I'm looking forward to this Feb when Horsetail runs again.  I think I will photograph the hoards of people all trying to get the same shot. Most of my favorite outdoor photographic experiences have been in areas devoid of others.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2013, 11:27:44 AM by HSakols » Logged
Isaac
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« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2013, 11:55:51 AM »
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... would you want to use something like that?

No. It seems too much like stamp collecting.

Would you like to contribute and share your known locations to public? If not - why?

No. I don't go to those locations to meet people; I go there to not meet people.
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NancyP
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« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2013, 01:55:11 PM »
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I use hiking and camping guidebooks to identify parks and trails. Because I photograph in a region without a predominance of bare rock, where most interesting formations are small scale, I take into consideration vegetation patterns, weather, dominant tree appropriate for composition. These aren't really "guidebook material". I learn about them by hiking the trails.

I would be likely to photo in the holes of other tripods if visiting other more traditionally photogenic regions, if only because I would be likely to hike well-described trails in a totally new environment. I don't like hiking with non-photographers when I have photography on my mind, because I stop and dawdle around when others are ready to move. If one isn't very experienced with the specific terrain and season, it makes sense to hike fairly commonly frequented trails when hiking solo. I have one of those emergency GPS beacons/transmitters, but really would like not to use it.
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Colorado David
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« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2013, 02:57:13 PM »
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A colleague of mine goes to great lengths to NOT disclose the locations of his photographs.  We work together often and he told me a story of a reader who emailed him after one of his articles appeared in an outdoor magazine.  The reader emailed to ask if the location was XYZ.  He was amazed that the reader was correct.  Without confirming the location, he wrote back to the reader and asked how he'd arrived at that conclusion.  The reader responded that he'd found some clues in the text of the story and then used google earth to check the terrain in the accompanying photos.

Everyone knows where Monument Valley is, it's everywhere else that is secret.  One of my favorite locations that I'm willing to share is . . . Colorado.
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Rajan Parrikar
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« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2013, 04:45:40 PM »
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Last year someone inquired about a view of Yosemite's Horsetail Falls where there were no crowds.  The only reason it has become such a circus is because of the internet.

You are being unfair to the internet.  The real fault lies with the aeroplane for facilitating quick transfer of the hordes and encouraging photo tours and workshops.  Secondary blame should go to the car rental companies.
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MarkM
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« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2013, 05:00:36 PM »
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One of my favorite locations that I'm willing to share is . . . Colorado.

Since I'm feeling generous today, I'll contribute that Alaska is pretty good too (but please don't tell everyone).


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Ray R
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« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2013, 05:25:01 PM »
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A couple of weeks ago I was on the Isle of Skye and was travelling towards Elgol for a sunset photograph, but changed my mind because 'everyone' goes there and I have been there before, so I went towards Camusunary Bay, about a 40 minute hike from the car.
There I met another photographer who said he had been to Elgol at the weekend, and there were about 15 photographers on the beach.
I knew then that I had probably made the right decision.

I will look for new places in future.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2013, 05:31:52 PM by Ray R » Logged
langier
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« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2013, 11:25:35 PM »
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I shot the hoards of people and the rows of cars abandoned along the parkway the Last time I went to Yosemite a couple of years ago on Ansel's birthday. The sky was totally overcast with no hope for light on the falls as Ansel thumbed his nose at everyone from above. I got the message early and found new to me photos that others were missing before I may the two hour drive home with no traffic to hinder my trip.

I got over using Ansel's holes in Yosemite after taking his workshop there back in the 1970s. Took me several years after that to figure out where I could make my own holes and I've never looked back. Decided there wasn't a future for me shooting just rocks and sticks...

I'm with Slobodan on this. The concept of a guide is fine for a student to learn, but not for me. There's millions of pix of all the major sites all over the U.S. and abroad taken from the same tripod holes all over the web as it is. I still want the serendipity of stumbling upon new and little known sites and photo ops. That's part of the joy!

Hey, maybe the guidebook will lead the masses away from my secret places! ;-)
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Larry Angier
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Alistair
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« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2013, 09:58:12 PM »
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Hi there,
I am part of a team who developed and just now published an app http://geoscover.com for discovering and sharing interesting photography locations (no worries - it is for free). I would like to know your thoughts about such a product - would you want to use something like that? Whould you like to contribute and share your known locations to public? If not - why? Would really appreciate your input.

BR,
Kaspars
It was only a matter of time before someone did this. Presumably content comes from photographers sharing their good photo locations. Already well-known locations will come quite quickly I expect. It will be interesting to see the extent to which folk are prepared to share high quality little-know locations. I personally would not but I never cease to be amazed at what folk are prepared to share on social media.
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dreed
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« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2013, 11:15:44 PM »
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I am part of a team who developed and just now published an app http://geoscover.com for discovering and sharing interesting photography locations (no worries - it is for free). I would like to know your thoughts about such a product - would you want to use something like that? Whould you like to contribute and share your known locations to public? If not - why? Would really appreciate your input.

I thought about doing something like this several years ago but none of those that I spoke to or emailed expressed any interest in it.
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dreed
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« Reply #15 on: December 06, 2013, 11:20:44 PM »
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Just knowing where to go is not enough to take a great landscape photo - both the weather and time of day have huge impact on the result.
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2013, 02:27:31 AM »
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Hi,

I like sharing info but I don't like mobile phones, so it doesn't work for me…

Best regards
Erik

Hi there,
I am part of a team who developed and just now published an app http://geoscover.com for discovering and sharing interesting photography locations (no worries - it is for free). I would like to know your thoughts about such a product - would you want to use something like that? Whould you like to contribute and share your known locations to public? If not - why? Would really appreciate your input.

BR,
Kaspars
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Alan Klein
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« Reply #17 on: December 07, 2013, 12:22:25 PM »
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Just knowing where to go is not enough to take a great landscape photo - both the weather and time of day have huge impact on the result.

Exactly.  There are other variables as well.  Here a shot that you're welcome to duplicate.  It was taken off the parking lot of  Sunken Meadow Park on Long Island NYS.  I'll even give the coordinates. N40 54.518 W73 15.414
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alanklein2000/5165318223/in/set-72157625476289859

Here's one I can't help you with the tripod holes.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alanklein2000/6060527164/in/set-72157625476289859/
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kikashi
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« Reply #18 on: December 08, 2013, 03:16:17 AM »
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Just knowing where to go is not enough to take a great landscape photo - both the weather and time of day have huge impact on the result.

Some, it is rumoured, have even had the temerity to suggest that artistic ability and technical skill are not entirely irrelevant.

Jeremy
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Vladimir Steblina
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« Reply #19 on: December 13, 2013, 11:21:09 PM »
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As a professional Forester that worked throughout the west for the past 40 years I have been at many, many spots that have never seen a photographer.  Wonderful spots for photography just waiting for somebody to find and photograph them.  Some landscapes have never been photographed well.....and I have shared and encouraged people to try and photograph them.  Hopefully, doing better than I did with them.

That said, a couple of years ago I stood at Tunnel View and watched as the sun and sky swirled around the landscape.  Then later I read Ansel Adams story about the "shot".  Yeah, I even took a couple of pictures that came out "interesting", but somewhat below what Ansel did with the scene.  The interesting part of that photo....is he knew before he took the picture the conditions he was looking for in the photo.  Actually, drove to the Tunnel View as the light and snow played out in Yosemite Valley.

I think there is a lot of value to go to famous photographic locations and taking your own pictures.   You gain a understanding and appreciation for the "original" photograph.  I look at it as going to class.

Here is a great book.....  Ansel Adams, “Examples: The Making of 40 Photographs”.   Great read.  I especially liked some of the comments when people saw the original photographs.....before the became classics.
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Retired Forester....rambling round
www.usbackroads.blogspot.com
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