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Author Topic: HDR Blues  (Read 1934 times)
wofsy
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« on: December 04, 2013, 09:07:22 AM »
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A few beginner's attempts at HDR using HDRpro in Photoshop CS5 do not come close to the sparkling images displayed on this web site. By comparison they seems drab. They do not have that amazing glow.

How id this achieved?
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2013, 11:39:48 AM »
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Avoid HDR, get up early or late and catch the good light.
No HDR or other technique will ever replace that.
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2013, 02:31:43 PM »
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Woofsy HDRpro by itself does not produce the goods.
A lot of work is subsequently required manipulating local tone and contrast to get a good result.
The fact that Lr will allow manipulation of 32-bit TIFF files has made things a lot easier.

Christoph has made a really valid point.
The need for HDR is continually shrinking due to improvements in sensor dynamic range in late-model cameras.

Nonetheless, HDR skills are still worth acquiring but there is a steep learning curve to get good results.

Tony Jay
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wofsy
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« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2013, 03:06:17 PM »
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Thanks Tony

So I guess the idea of Hdr is to insure that there is a large amount of information in the extreme tones. Then one manipulates as usual in Photoshop.
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wofsy
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« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2013, 03:12:38 PM »
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So which cameras today offer this broad dynamic range? Lots I have seen fail. I have a Canon 5D Mark 2 and it  seems to miss the mark too, so to speak.
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2013, 07:05:56 PM »
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Thanks Tony

So I guess the idea of Hdr is to insure that there is a large amount of information in the extreme tones. Then one manipulates as usual in Photoshop.

I would not use Ps.
I would import a 32-bit TIFF into Lr and do my processing there.

Tony Jay
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2013, 07:10:35 PM »
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So which cameras today offer this broad dynamic range? Lots I have seen fail. I have a Canon 5D Mark 2 and it  seems to miss the mark too, so to speak.
The DR issue is a work in progress.
The 5D mark III is better than the 5D mark II but the difference is not a quantom leap.
Recent Sony sensors, found in Nikon and, of course, Sony cameras, have excellent DR and are a big leap forward for "full frame" sensors.
Many pro's who shoot landscape have migrated to the Nikon D800 with its combination of excellent DR as well as the 36 MP sensor.

Tony Jay
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David Eckels
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« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2013, 10:23:45 PM »
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I would not use Ps.
I would import a 32-bit TIFF into Lr and do my processing there.

Tony Jay
I can second that. You'll be surprised and pleased with what's possible in LR using a 32 bit file.
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2013, 01:46:13 AM »
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I would not use Ps.
I would import a 32-bit TIFF into Lr and do my processing there.

Hi Tony,

Why not import the 32-bit TIFF into ACR ? No LR required.
ACR gives almost the same control over the tonemapping as LR.

Cheers,
Bart
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2013, 04:37:15 AM »
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Why not import the 32-bit TIFF into ACR ? No LR required.
ACR gives almost the same control over the tonemapping as LR.

No issues with this - just don't see the point of using a pixel editor if it isn't required.

Tony Jay
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hjulenissen
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« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2013, 07:51:16 AM »
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Thanks Tony

So I guess the idea of Hdr is to insure that there is a large amount of information in the extreme tones. Then one manipulates as usual in Photoshop.
"HDR" can mean many things, depending on context. Most commonly it will mean the combined actions of:
1. Using exposure bracketing in order to capture more DR information than the camera image sensor is capable of in one go
2. Synthesizing a single, high-DR image from the raw files
3. Applying automated tone-mapping in order to make the HDR file viewable on LDR displays/prints

It is perfectly possible to do exposure bracketing in order to only "pick the best" afterwards, or to combine them using other techniques (e.g. blending). It is possible to massage a HDR image into LDR by manual tehcniques. It is also possible to apply tone-mapping techniques on single camera images.

There are also other techniques for capturing a wide-DR scene (e.g. graduated ND-filters), or for reducing the DR of a scene (timing the sun position, using flash etc).

I believe that the main point is to have a scene that is "pretty" or that interest you. Once you have that, applying good technique will only allow you to capture it better.

-h
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2013, 08:48:22 PM »
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"HDR" can mean many things, depending on context. Most commonly it will mean the combined actions of:
1. Using exposure bracketing in order to capture more DR information than the camera image sensor is capable of in one go
2. Synthesizing a single, high-DR image from the raw files
3. Applying automated tone-mapping in order to make the HDR file viewable on LDR displays/prints

It is perfectly possible to do exposure bracketing in order to only "pick the best" afterwards, or to combine them using other techniques (e.g. blending). It is possible to massage a HDR image into LDR by manual tehcniques. It is also possible to apply tone-mapping techniques on single camera images.

There are also other techniques for capturing a wide-DR scene (e.g. graduated ND-filters), or for reducing the DR of a scene (timing the sun position, using flash etc).

I believe that the main point is to have a scene that is "pretty" or that interest you. Once you have that, applying good technique will only allow you to capture it better.

-h
A nice summary of the broader conceptual approach to HDR.

Tony Jay
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