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Author Topic: Profiling a projecter with the Munki  (Read 1165 times)
walter.sk
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« on: December 07, 2013, 08:20:13 PM »
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I posted a question about this a few months ago on the Projectors forum but never got a response, so here goes:

The projector I've been using is much brighter than the one it replaced, and even after being profiled with the Color Munki the results are too bright in the highlights.  I am using a Win7 computer and the Munki profile is selected as default.  I have  "native" set for the white point.

I tried lowering the brightness of the projector itself by a few points before doing the profile, and brought in a grayscale file in 5pt steps I made and checked in Photoshop, and all values from 05 to 255 are visible (except that 0 and 05 are almost impossible to differentiate).

Another person said I should do the profile first with the projector at +/- 0 for the brightness setting, and then adjust the projector once the profile is made and being used.  Wouldn't that have an unpredictable effect on the overall accuracy of the profile?



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Simon J.A. Simpson
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« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2013, 10:59:21 AM »
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Walter, I hope you haven't given up on getting a response to your question because it is possible I may have an answer.  I needed to consult with someone first, thus the delay.  I have experienced the same problem with clipped highlights (and shadows).  Here is how it was resolved.

Please forgive me if you know any of this already …

Basically projectors are set-up out of the box to provide a bright contrasty image in daylight.  But many (most ?) can be set to a variety of internal 'profiles' which, for the projection of photographic images, the better will be called something like “photographic” or perhaps “sRGB” (some experimentation will be necessary).  This can set the projector to (hopefully) give a satisfactory image in terms of brightness, gamma and contrast.  Another way of improving clipped highlights may be to run the projector in “eco” or low–power mode.

When you've decided on a satisfactory set of internal settings for the projector then you can then profile it.  The resulting profile will ‘drive’ the output from your computer to the projector.  But then, of course, you must ensure that the internal settings of the projector do not get changed or this would invalidate what the profile is trying to do.

I'm not familiar with how Windows manages all this but my guess is that the profile has to be selected in the Control Panel(?) for the projector driver.  I managed to achieve this on a Mac.
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walter.sk
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« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2013, 12:41:45 PM »
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When you've decided on a satisfactory set of internal settings for the projector then you can then profile it.  The resulting profile will ‘drive’ the output from your computer to the projector.  But then, of course, you must ensure that the internal settings of the projector do not get changed or this would invalidate what the profile is trying to do.

Thanks for the reply.  I have the projector set up for sRGB with Computer as the input. I agree with your procedure.  What I did was simply lower the brightness setting on the projector by 6 points.  Reducing contrast by even 1 point made the very darkest tones muddy, so the only change was to the brightness.  I then profiled with the ColorMunki.

Another person said that I should profile first and then reduce the brightness on the projector.  His reasoning was as follows:  If I reduce the brightness first, the ColorMunki would then do a profile that would try to compensate for the lowered brightness, and I would end up with a too-bright profile again.  That point confuses me, and I still believe the correct way would be to adjust the brightness of the projector and then profile.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2013, 01:31:41 PM »
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That point confuses me, and I still believe the correct way would be to adjust the brightness of the projector and then profile.
It is. For one, it worked <g> 2nd, you can't calibrate without altering the settings manually as you did. Otherwise we're just making a profile of the current, undesirable behavior which doesn't help.
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
walter.sk
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« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2013, 02:27:43 PM »
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Many thanks.  I shoulda made a bet with the guy...
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