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Author Topic: Metal Prints  (Read 945 times)
wmchauncey
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« on: December 29, 2013, 05:53:40 PM »
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Does any photographic genre lend itself more to metal prints than would another genre...wildlife, landscape, B&W/color, portrait, or...
put another way, is there one genre that one should be avoided printing on metal? 
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Scott Martin
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« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2013, 10:12:01 PM »
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Can you tell us where you're coming from with this? What's the background?

Also, are you referring to sublimation prints on metal, UV Curable prints on metal, or something else?

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wmchauncey
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« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2013, 05:42:39 AM »
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Prints like from here seem to be the norm.....http://www.bayphoto.com/metalprints/single/index.htm
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The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

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Scott Martin
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« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2013, 06:06:15 AM »
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Prints like from here seem to be the norm...

Different people and markets have different norms. :-] The BayPhoto prints are sublimation transfer prints.

Can you tell us where you're coming from with your question? What are you trying to do? What are you thinking?
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Scott Martin
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« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2013, 06:11:51 AM »
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Are you trying to determine what's best for your own work? If so, I'd just get started and make some. Finding the perfect presentation method is highly subjective and requires experimentation, money and failure. "Fail Faster" as they say! Making knowledgable decisions requires hands-on experience. And getting options from others doesn't lead to breakthroughs or innovation.
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wmchauncey
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« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2013, 06:44:16 AM »
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Quote
What are you trying to do? What are you thinking?
Take the last seven images in my sharing site...http://1x.com/member/chauncey43
consisting of pastels/dark backgrounds/garish reflection/abstract are all larger images, 20"x20" minimum, would any of them not work well if printed on metal?         Huh
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money and failure. "Fail Faster" as they say
It would seem more fiscally advantageous to first seek the wisdom of those more knowledgeable.      Wink
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The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

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Scott Martin
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« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2013, 07:49:13 AM »
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Areas of smooth, solid color (like skies) can show the inconsistencies of the sublimation transfer process. Images that have lots of fine detail (like your wavy water backgrounds) can mask these imperfections and work better. Larger prints like 24x30 and greater show the wavy, not perfectly flat nature of these metal prints, so I generally encourage people to use then for smaller sizes. Some print vendor mount their sublimation metal prints to more rigid backing which makes them perfectly flat at larger sizes but adds to the cost.

Mostly importantly, how will these be presented (floating, tin a frame, etc) and how will your client base receive them?
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Scott Martin
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« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2013, 10:12:12 AM »
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It might also be smart to get the advise of your print distribution channels (galleries, etc). I personally work with art placement consultants, galleries, and contemporary art centers. I keep a variety of prints in my own studio and ask for their options when they drop by for a studio visit. The feedback that I've received from them has pushed me away from canvas and sublimation transfer and towards fiber base papers for prints up to 24x30 and liquid laminated UV Curable printing on metal for larger pieces. I've been drawn to some other processes but their knowledge of the buyers needs has been invaluable. Your results, printing processes, and customer's wishes may vary though, of course!
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Some Guy
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« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2013, 10:25:19 AM »
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As to what would look best, send some to Bay Photo and use their "Test Print" feature where they do four surfaces of the same image on 5x7 metal plates for about $35.  It will give you an idea.  I think they also do a smaller 4x6 test series too.  Takes about a week to get them.  You can download their ROES software and order off it.

I went to the place in Scotts Valley, CA a year or so ago.  Big place, over 110,000 square foot building where they do a lot of books and sundry stuff.  Might have been the old Seagate Hard Drive building at one time.  They have some really large metal prints on their lobby wall, maybe 4x9 feet in size.  I have a 16x20 inch in a floating frame and it is nice.  Actually, their framing prices with a metal print is far less than what my local framer charges alone for the same size - and faster turn around too.

SG
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Atlex.com
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« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2013, 10:33:50 AM »
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Does any photographic genre lend itself more to metal prints than would another genre...wildlife, landscape, B&W/color, portrait, or...
put another way, is there one genre that one should be avoided printing on metal? 


Technically, it depends on how you want to print your images.  You can surely go with dye sublimation printing; which there are now small desktop printers available for this application as well as larger (24"+) to do bigger products.  Otherwise, you can go with metallic paper that give a good unique look but won't look as HIGH quality and much more vivid than Dye Sub would.  You can do many things with dye sublimation to make them last for a long time and there are many different shapes to work with as well.

Many photographers or artist go with metallic paper since it's not at thick and you can print directly from your inkjet printer.
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