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Author Topic: Hasselblad H5D-60 review  (Read 5123 times)
David Watson
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« on: January 12, 2014, 04:23:19 PM »
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Well done Michael.  At last a balanced, well written and interesting review of a Hasselblad system.

I searched through the article vainly looking for the sting in the tail, perhaps a little irony or a subtle put-down but no!  It is a totally straight and first class review.  As a retired "wealthy duffer" who used to own one of these cameras (well actually an H4D-60) I can safely say that Michael is totally right - the possession of this camera does not imply that one can take better photographs.  In fact it is an impediment to better photography in hands such as mine.  It is so heavy I never wanted to stray far from the car when doing my bit of landscape photography and I frequently found myself focussing on the wrong part of the image.

I did like looking at it, share Michael's enthusiasm for the organisation of the buttons and it did look very nice in one of my collection of camera bags.  When I did my test shots and pixel peeped the results I can safely confirm that it produced stunning results.

I sold it because I really could not afford the army of assistants required to carry the system and the lights needed in the studio and on location and I was embarrassed to carry it anywhere on holiday where I might be seen or could get mugged.

Bravo Michael!
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David Watson ARPS
jerome_m
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« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2014, 01:25:49 AM »
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A quick note about the article: I think that the H system was closed with the H3D-2, not with the H3D. I would also have liked to see the H5D compared to the seemingly similar H4D. I have read that, although the cameras appear almost identical in their features, the H5D line has been reworked internally, is now manufactured entirely in Sweden with no help from Fuji and that the back is considerably faster in operation (e.g. displaying pictures).

If you have the time, a short review of the recently issued lenses would also be nice. I have the pleasure to own the HC 50mm - II. It is quite impressive.
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wildlightphoto
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« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2014, 09:16:03 AM »
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One random thought... it was noted in the review that "Sadly, one also can't think about mixing and matching between Hasselblad and Phase or Leaf or Mamiya." however one can add a Leica S body to the Hasselblad system using Leica's lens adapter which allows the use of H lenses with full function and adds the option of using a focal-plane shutter.
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Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2014, 09:32:09 AM »
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Read the update, would cry if I wasn't so busy puking.
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hcubell
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« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2014, 10:09:40 AM »
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Not true that you cannot still mix and match the Hasselblad H system and Phase One Backs. The H1, H2 and (apparently) H4X bodies work very well with all of the latest Phase One Backs. IMO, the best of both worlds.
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David Watson
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« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2014, 10:38:15 AM »
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Read the update, would cry if I wasn't so busy puking.

Snake oil anyone?

Will someone please tell the nice people in China that they are being well and truly conned. 
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wildlightphoto
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« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2014, 10:39:21 AM »
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Read the update, would cry if I wasn't so busy puking.

+1

Hasselblad's product managers imagine that the Lunar will succeed by riding the H-system's coat tails but it may be that the reverse is also likely: the H-system's image will be tarnished by being chained to the ugly Lunar wart.
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jerome_m
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« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2014, 11:19:00 AM »
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Frankly, we should cease to care about the Lunar. Either it sells well and will finance the MF line or it does not sell and will quickly be forgotten. All we should be concerned about are new MF cameras, backs and lenses.
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KLaban
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« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2014, 12:28:27 PM »
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Frankly, we should cease to care about the Lunar. Either it sells well and will finance the MF line or it does not sell and will quickly be forgotten. All we should be concerned about are new MF cameras, backs and lenses.

Agreed.

See the Lunar for what it is, a crock of shite, and then get over it.

No need for it to ruin your day.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2014, 12:57:52 PM by KLaban » Logged

amolitor
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« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2014, 12:44:23 PM »
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But the people in China are not being conned. This is a device which very clearly exhibits its price tag, just like a piece of designer clothing or a designer handbag.

This is what the luxury market is all about. It's not that it's better. Nobody thinks it's better. It's more expensive, and everyone knows it.

Thank goodness there's a luxury market, eh? Nobody would ever sell a photograph if there wasn't!
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2014, 01:00:54 PM »
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Concerning the update:
Money rules the world ... at least peoples imaginations about it.
The update made my day.
I'll go to sleep with a chuckle today.
Wink
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Rob C
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« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2014, 04:09:21 PM »
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Didn't read the review because life is short and no way am I interested/capable of buying in that niche; however, I have to say that the accompanying pictures did look something special; I was particularly taken with the 'look' of the more or less black/white one. I can see that if you have the business to sustain it, a good buy. Of course, even better a buy if it were square!

Rob C
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stever
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« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2014, 04:16:50 PM »
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Michael is completely right about the long term nature of a MF system investment.  The company's stability of ownership, financial health,  and demonstrated competence of management should weigh heavily on the decision.
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ysengrain
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« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2014, 04:09:43 AM »
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If you put in perspective the fact that Hasselblad is able at the same time to make Hasselblad H5D-60 review and the so called and pathetic Lunar
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bcooter
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« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2014, 08:56:54 AM »
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If you put in perspective the fact that Hasselblad is able at the same time to make Hasselblad H5D-60 review and the so called and pathetic Lunar

If we make a list of absurd products we'd have to buy ten terabytes of data.

In the past Hasselblad made gold colored and Ferrari red and animal skinned limited editions.

In fact every camera company has made some kind of limited edition for collectors.

I don't need it, wouldn't buy most of the above, but when we talk absurd the whole digital process is pretty insane, given any update almost always requires a new camera or back.

I mean who would have thought a new film meant buying a $3,000 to $7,000 35mm camera?

So the Lunar, yea it's a mess but there is a lot of mess out there in the world.

Ever see a orange Lamborghini, parked in front of the Ivy on Robertson?


IMO

BC


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Rob C
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« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2014, 01:03:53 PM »
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If we make a list of absurd products we'd have to buy ten terabytes of data.

Ever see a orange Lamborghini, parked in front of the Ivy on Robertson?


IMO

BC


I look at it like this: one way or the other, it hooked you enough to have you snap it; I would absolutely have loved to have had such a thing when I was young and could see well enough to know what was out there a couple of miles in front, gauge how fast it was going and also the closing speed of the red Ferrari coming at me the other way. Reversing? Reversing is for wimps and car park valets. If you can trust them with the keys, never mind the wheels. Oh, life in the fast lane! So many worries!

Is it yours?

Rob C
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MarkL
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« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2014, 03:35:10 PM »
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But the people in China are not being conned. This is a device which very clearly exhibits its price tag, just like a piece of designer clothing or a designer handbag.

This is what the luxury market is all about. It's not that it's better. Nobody thinks it's better. It's more expensive, and everyone knows it.

Thank goodness there's a luxury market, eh? Nobody would ever sell a photograph if there wasn't!


Leica would cease to exist for a start!
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Dave Millier
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« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2014, 07:30:26 AM »
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I don't recognise this model of car and I'm sure it's probably really good but it's ugly.  It looks like a child's idea of high tech and modern, like a Transformer toy.  Add as many unnecessary and non-functional "knobbly bits" as is possible.  Is "luxury" always associated with bad aesthetic taste?

I look at it like this: one way or the other, it hooked you enough to have you snap it; I would absolutely have loved to have had such a thing when I was young and could see well enough to know what was out there a couple of miles in front, gauge how fast it was going and also the closing speed of the red Ferrari coming at me the other way. Reversing? Reversing is for wimps and car park valets. If you can trust them with the keys, never mind the wheels. Oh, life in the fast lane! So many worries!

Is it yours?

Rob C
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Rob C
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« Reply #18 on: January 19, 2014, 02:46:47 PM »
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I don't imagine Lamborghini does non-functional bits n' bobs; they cost money and usually have a technical use, however esoteric that may be. Weight costs performance...

Ugly? I don't see much beauty in diamonds, either, but women sure do. Is there beauty and delicacy in a lethal Japanese sword? Does a Hasselblad 500 Series or a Leics lllG have beauty? I'd say yes, they do, whereas an M3 leaves me cold(ish).

Strokes, folks and money: make the world go round.

Rob C
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David Watson
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« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2014, 03:53:07 PM »
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I don't imagine Lamborghini does non-functional bits n' bobs; they cost money and usually have a technical use, however esoteric that may be. Weight costs performance...

Ugly? I don't see much beauty in diamonds, either, but women sure do. Is there beauty and delicacy in a lethal Japanese sword? Does a Hasselblad 500 Series or a Leics lllG have beauty? I'd say yes, they do, whereas an M3 leaves me cold(ish).

Strokes, folks and money: make the world go round.

Rob C

There are quite a few cars like this being driven around central London where the average traffic speed is perhaps 10mph.  Sensible? - no.  In fact nothing about cars like this is sensible other than the fact that they are expensive and enable people with much more money than they need to demonstrate that fact.

I remember, in a moment of near insanity, considering buying a Ferrari and borrowed one from our local dealer for the day (many years ago when prices were still relatively sensible).  I took it back mid-afternoon in a very disappointed frame of mind.  It wasn't faster than other cars I had driven and owned, it wasn't more comfortable, and it had a flimsy feel.  I mentioned this to the salesman who smiled and said people don't buy these cars as a mode of transport or for driving thrills but as sensuous cult objects to show off with.  By and large they sit quietly in garages whilst their owners drive something sensible on a daily basis.  They drive them to show off at weddings, family events and so on but only if it is sunny and not too far.  When they trade them in they generally have only a few thousand miles on them.

Turning to Hasselblad we have this weird split personality thing going on.  We have a work horse well designed and made professional MFD system and on the other a Lambo/Ferrari bit of bling.  Perhaps the bling will finance the good bits - who knows - but then who really knows, despite my comments above, why someone would waste $300,000 on a Lamborghini.

Just so you know that I am not an anti-car nut one of my cars is a nice 12 year old Porsche bought cheaply as a second hand car because it is really nice to drive.
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David Watson ARPS
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