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Author Topic: Adobe Camera Raw with multi processor cores  (Read 2794 times)
BHoll
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« on: January 18, 2014, 04:11:46 AM »
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Hi,

I've got a question that's been on my mind for quite a while (ever since I bought my MacbookPro 2 years ago):
When batch-converting RAW to TIF or JPG on my old dual-core Macbook (with an older version of ACR and the DNG Converter), I always see 2 images being converted at the same time. (2 cores = 2 images).

On my new Macbook Pro (4 processor cores), it's always 1 image at a time (using Photoshop CS6). I was hoping it'd be 4, or maybe even 8, because of  multithreading...

Seems a step backwards to me... or am I missing a setting? I mean do I need to enable multi-core processing somewhere?

Thanks for your help!

Bjorn

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madmanchan
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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2014, 10:05:33 AM »
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Hi Bjorn,

Camera Raw also uses multiple cores when processing an individual image.  Thus if you're running on a machine with more cores, you shouldn't necessarily expect that the number of cores will equal the number of images that ACR chooses to process simultaneously.  (e.g., some of those cores will instead be used to accelerate the processing of one of those images) 
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langier
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2014, 12:16:17 PM »
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Hi Bjorn,

Between ACR version 2010 and 2012 (current), the software was rewritten from the ground up. It does a lot more math and processes the images with more finese...

When I used Photoshop CS5, I would watch four raw images process at once and zip right through the folder on my quad-core, even raw files from the D800.

When I use Photoshop CS6/CC the images process much slower than before but for many of them, the quality is much better. I don't get the ugly halos from the clarity slider as in older versions. Other controls when pushed to their limits used to have issues and I had to restrain myself or the image would have issues. Less so today with the current ACR.

Always seems like a trade-off, but in this case, the trade-off is for the better, IMO.
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BHoll
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2014, 02:57:11 PM »
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Thanks for your reply. Yes, I also noticed the much better quality in recent versions of the raw conversion. In the past, when doing conversions for high-end & fine-art uses, Capture was my software of choice. But LR and ACR have caught up.

Anyway glad to know that I'm not the only one where the ACR/DNG conversions don't process multiple images at a time.

Bjorn
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