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Author Topic: Considering OMD 1; couple of questions  (Read 15069 times)
adokeeffe
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« Reply #60 on: May 06, 2014, 09:12:51 PM »
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As I will be travelling for the next year I am looking for a single camera solution that will give me the best possible scope and quality in the smallest package available. After reviewing advanced pocketable cameras like the Sony RX100 MkII and Fuji X20 and wanting better handling and quality I narrowed it down to either the Fuji X-T1 or Olympus E-M1.

As a comparison for size and handling I checked out the D7100 and D610. As to be expected, with the bigger glass, especially the 24-70 f2.8 Nikkor, they were just enormous.

I also looked at the Sony A7, but the lack of quality native glass and very polarised reviews and opinions made me abandon it. However, I did like the viewfinder a lot and felt it was noticeably better than both the X-T1 and E-M1.

So, here I am with decision fatigue because I'm drawn to both the X-T1 and E-M1. Both offer very different styles of handling - the X-T1 with a snappy/casual rangefinder feel and the E-M1 with a DSLR grip for a much more deliberate feel. But, at the end of the day the E-M1 is a far more rounded and polished camera. Except... shooting to SD card on both and comparing JPEG output (no NR or sharpening) I found the X-T1 to be very noticeably better than the E-M1. However, the E-M1 was running firmware version 1.0 and so I will update it and try again.

The X-T1 had beautiful JPEG quality and I was more than a tad disappointed that the E-M1 couldn't come close. Not only was the grain more noisy, but the edges had classic JPEG artefacts (both cameras set to Large Fine JPEG).

The E-M1 was using the 12-40 f2.8, and the X-T1 the 18-55 f2.8-4.

Can anyone suggest settings to get the E-M1 to shoot better JPEGs? I'll be shooting SOOC, mostly.

To be honest, I'm a bit concerned that the m43 is going to be a bit limiting in scope (mostly the lack of low light capability - I want to be capture what I want when I want while walking streets at night or inside) when considered as my only camera for the next few years. I'm also hesitant to invest too heavily in the m43 lenses for the same reason. But, I just don't know.

As bcooter said, getting something FF like the 5dmII and a bunch of second hand glass is going to deliver the best scope and bang for buck. I had considered this with the D610 but size and weight just killed that idea. That and the fact that much of the good glass is expensive and still containing more compromises than equivalent m43 and Fuji glass.

I think all I need is a little convincing that the E-M1 is going to give me 95% of what I want for the next few years. As a camera system for lots of hard work it seems perfect. More so than the X-T1. The E-M1 just feels like a workhorse whereas the X-T1 is very nice but a boutique camera no less. Is that a fair assessment?

Dayumn, if only the E-M1 had a bigger sensor the choice would be easier. Cheers.

I don't know if labeling the X-T1 a "boutique camera" is going to help your decision, this sounds like the sort of dismissal a "serious" photographer would make of mirror-less cameras, the same sort of "serious photographer" who would scoff at the E-M1 being labelled a "workhorse", despite never having used one. At the end of the day it's a box with a lens on the front that captures images, and it appears from your own assessment that the Fuji box gives better jpegs straight out of camera than the Olympus box, so I say go for it. Either system will be a compromise - the Fuji is harder to work with quickly according to some (but then this comes down to how YOU shoot), and the X-system is currently missing a serious flash unit and a fast telephoto zoom, although there will be two tele-zooms by the year's end. But the Fuji's larger sensor, better low light performance and quality jpegs sound more suited to your needs (not that I've ever heard anyone complain about Olympus jpeg quality). It also sounds like you find the Fuji's control scheme appealing rather than confronting, so I say quit deliberating - grab one and start shooting.
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sabesh
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« Reply #61 on: May 16, 2014, 02:22:39 AM »
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Fuji sensor is actually subpar vs Sony APS-C implementations <snip>
That's interesting. I have a Fuji A6000  and an Olympus OM-D E-M1. I used to own a Fuji X100s. The IQ from that camera appears to be as good as the Sony A6000's, but I never conducted any scientific tests. Do you have a link to such a comparison test between the Fuji & Sony sensors? Thx.
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eronald
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« Reply #62 on: May 16, 2014, 07:23:51 AM »
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J,

 The problem with the 5D2 is that on some samples the focus is a bit random. As a friend at Canon told me after we tested *their* 5D2 inside their offices with fast 200: "I looked at the shots and it was focusing about anywhere". It wasn't malfunctioning, it was just not really accurate. My friend Norman Koren (author of Imatest) came to Paris with a borrowed 5D2 and standard zoom, and I warned him about this, he laughed, when he got back he noticed a good fraction of his imagery was blurred. I went to the races - and you know I'm an ex-event photographer and have the care and awareness which goes with that- and for some reason the AF system disliked the colorful jockeys jackets in the sun with the 135/2 and suddenly turned out a bunch of blurry images of the horses being slowly led out of the paddock (not the race itself). On a tennis match, the focus was better than my Nikon. What can I say? I got wonderful images from the 5D2, it punches well above its weight when it is having a good day, but is totally unreliable. The used 1Ds3 I got by swapping my 5D2 is sharp, clean and totally reliable day in day out. I would recommend a used 1Ds3 - they cost around $1500 now, are built like trucks, and AFAIK deliver zero surprises. Although for all I know some of them may have the action focus bug of the 1D3.

Edmund


Don't do this to me.   I don't mind be responsible for 6 figures of client money, but someone's personal money makes we sweat.

I don't know what you shoot, but if I was only going to be allowed one camera, I'd just buy a 5d2 (not 3) because I like the 2 better.  They're cheap, kind of clunky and big, but lenses fall out of the trees and they last forever.

If you shoot a lot of video/motion then I'd do the new panasonic gh4 (probably) but m43 isn't cheap if your completely changing systems.

Even the Sony A7 is high considering the camera and size.  I priced an A7 with a medium compliment of lenses and it hits 10 grand easily.

Don't get me wrong, for a lot of what people do like Michael, the olympus works well for him and it's a beautiful camera, but to recommend what someone does with "their" hard earned cash.

I don't want those points on my drives liscense if something goes south.

I would recommend the camera for me, but I have a lot of cameras.

IMO

BC
« Last Edit: May 16, 2014, 07:33:49 AM by eronald » Logged
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« Reply #63 on: May 16, 2014, 01:49:08 PM »
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The 5DIII focussing is in a different class compared to the MKII, the outer zones are all reliable and usable wide open which is not the case with the II
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« Reply #64 on: May 16, 2014, 02:43:43 PM »
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The 5DIII focussing is in a different class compared to the MKII, the outer zones are all reliable and usable wide open which is not the case with the II

I second that.  And it's not just the outer zones that are better; the center is too.  With the 5D3, Canon raised the AF from consumer level to pro level (i.e. essentially as good as the 1DX).  LensRentals did some AF accuracy tests here:

http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2012/07/autofocus-reality-part-3a-canon-lenses
http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2012/08/autofocus-reality-part-3b-canon-cameras

Some notes from the above:
- Canon's newer lenses have much more accurate phase detect AF on the 5D3, but not on the 5D2.
- The AF of the 5D3 was not a minor upgrade over that of the 5D2.
- The 5D2, even on its release, was known to have “consumer-grade” autofocus.
- The 1Ds3 included every possible AF technology of the day [back in 2007], including a separate AF processing chip.

Unfortunately, "Older cameras don’t have accurate enough AF sensors to take advantage of the new lenses’ capabilities.  Older lenses can’t move their focusing elements with enough accuracy to take advantage of the new cameras’ accurate sensors." — LensRentals.com

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Vladimirovich
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« Reply #65 on: May 16, 2014, 04:27:33 PM »
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That's interesting. I have a Fuji A6000  and an Olympus OM-D E-M1. I used to own a Fuji X100s. The IQ from that camera appears to be as good as the Sony A6000's, but I never conducted any scientific tests. Do you have a link to such a comparison test between the Fuji & Sony sensors? Thx.

http://home.comcast.net/~NikonD70/

you can download software, test your cameras, contribute results, discuss/argue w/ author - actually you can be the first to contribute a Sony camera there if you have one
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pdk42
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« Reply #66 on: May 17, 2014, 08:31:09 AM »
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Hi all,

Just joined the forum after reading this thread.  I've been an Oly u43 user for about a year and a half now since switching from a Canon 5dii.  Like many who've made similar journeys, I got into u43 to have a small camera to take when I didn't want to haul the Canon about.  It didn't take too long to realise that in many circumstances, the IQ was no worse in any meaningful way to the Canon and boy, was it smaller, lighter and actually, more fun!  I went from being an OVF snob to an EVF evangelist, love IBIS and I find the accuracy of AF way better than the Canon ever managed.  I sold all my Canon gear and would never go back.

Now, I know that this isn't a move that will suit everyone.  I'm strictly an amateur, don't do sports or BIF and don't usually print beyond 16x20 (but I've done some bigger acrylic wall frames) and for me, u43 delivers all I need.  With an E-M5 and a few primes, I can pack it all into a small bag and go hiking all day without any shoulder ache or such like by the time the sun sinks below the horizon; and I know the IQ will be more than good enough for competition or hanging on the wall.

I'm currently running an E-M5 and E-P5 combo, but I'll be dropping the E-P5 and picking up an E-M1 soon.  The rationale is that whilst I love EVFs, I'm really not enjoying rear-screen composition, except for use on a tripod or for low level shots.  So, I want a setup with built in EVF. 

So, now the main point of my post...   I'd be really interested to hear from anyone with both an E-M5 and E-M1 about differences they've found between the files from the two cameras.  I love the files from the M5 and P5 and of course they share the same sensor.  From what I've seen on the web, there are differences on the E-M1 but the reviews never go into enough detail.
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« Reply #67 on: May 17, 2014, 12:56:45 PM »
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So, now the main point of my post...   I'd be really interested to hear from anyone with both an E-M5 and E-M1 about differences they've found between the files from the two cameras. 

you shall drop E-M5, not E-P5 because it is not getting EFCS ( http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3651827 ) like E-M1 or E-P5

tripod or IBIS does not matter, E-M5 is not worth it now just for that reason...

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pdk42
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« Reply #68 on: May 17, 2014, 03:49:21 PM »
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you shall drop E-M5, not E-P5 because it is not getting EFCS ( http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3651827 ) like E-M1 or E-P5

tripod or IBIS does not matter, E-M5 is not worth it now just for that reason...



I see where you're going, but I've never experienced shutter shock on my E-M5. I did observe it on the E-P5 though, although I found it hard to reproduce at will.  In fact, I thought for a while that I had got lucky and had an E-P5 which was immune to it.  I really love my E-M5.  I never really gelled with the E-P5 in the same way.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2014, 04:03:57 PM by pdk42 » Logged

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« Reply #69 on: May 17, 2014, 04:12:42 PM »
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So, now the main point of my post...   I'd be really interested to hear from anyone with both an E-M5 and E-M1 about differences they've found between the files from the two cameras.  I love the files from the M5 and P5 and of course they share the same sensor.  From what I've seen on the web, there are differences on the E-M1 but the reviews never go into enough detail.




The em-5 and em-1 have different sensors.  The 5 uses Sony, the 1 uses Panasonic, at least that's what I'm told.

I own both cameras, along with the gh3's.

My take is the em-5 produces a prettier file in the fact it's more color receptive and has a prettier texture than the em-1 which to me has more of a smoother, but global color.

The Em-1 is a  better camera, not as enduring as the em-5, but has a few more features, slightly larger and easier to use, focus is about the same.

I bought an Em-1 because it allowed standard 43 lenses and has a pc sync.   The lenses, I've forgotten about because the focus of 43 lenses wasn't great and since Panasonic has come out with fast 42.5 mm primes and soon a 150mm 2.8 the standard 43 lenses are becoming less needed.

The Em-1 also has a better viewfinder, really amazing viewfinder, but if you add the ev-4 clip on viewfinder to the em-5 you get the same results and the viewfinder goes up and down so you can shoot standard and also low like a waist level finder.

I don't understand the shutter shake people mention with the em-5 because I've never seen it.

Actually last Dec. I really was excited about the Sony A7 and tested it next to my em-5 numerous times.

This image was shot at the Sony store (right before they closed) and honestly the A7 had blur, the em-5 didn't.

This is not an artistic but interesting image as it was a room full of mixed lighting from tungsten to led's bouncing around and the em-5 was really pretty, the sony a7 was very global and kind of warm orange and working both later in Raw Developer I couldn't get the same results.


BTW this is cropped to about 2.3 of a frame

here it is at 1000 iso close to full rez.

http://www.russellrutherford.com/stony_store_large.jpg

To be fair both the em-5 and 1 focus very quickly, but neither track focus very well.

To track focus the only way I've made it work is to set it to single, and just touch, then shoot, touch then shoot and for medium speed subjects the em-1 will hit focus.

From em-1


My bottom line is both cameras are very good, shoot way above their format and both are close to equal to any less than 20mpx dslr made.

The em-5 is really inexpensive now about 1/2 the price of the 1 so with an ev-4 finder you probably have as good if not better camera than the em-1.

In fact the em-5 has more latitude than my 1dx



But before I spent the money, I would rent a em-1 from borrow lens and see for yourself.

I really have to admit that the em-1 is a very, very, very well built camera.

IMO

BC
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« Reply #70 on: May 17, 2014, 04:46:56 PM »
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The Em-1 is a  better camera, not as enduring as the em-5, but has a few more features, slightly larger and easier to use, focus is about the same.

To be fair both the em-5 and 1 focus very quickly, but neither track focus very well.

The em-5 is really inexpensive now about 1/2 the price of the 1 so with an ev-4 finder you probably have as good if not better camera than the em-1.

I really have to admit that the em-1 is a very, very, very well built camera.

IMO

BC

I would hope the EM1 would be more "enduring" than the EM5!  After all, it does earn a "Pro" designation.  Unless you meant "endearing", which is a very subjective thing (though I agree, to an extent).

In terms of focus tracking, the EM1 is better.  Though still not brilliant, it's actually pretty good if you shoot video.

An EM5 with external viewfinder loses its main advantage over the EM1 as it becomes clumsy and bulky.  There are many other considerations of course, the biggest of which is that there is now an even cheaper and well-spec'd EM10 to think about...
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« Reply #71 on: May 17, 2014, 05:57:18 PM »
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I would hope the EM1 would be more "enduring" than the EM5!  After all, it does earn a "Pro" designation.  Unless you meant "endearing", which is a very subjective thing (though I agree, to an extent).

In terms of focus tracking, the EM1 is better.  Though still not brilliant, it's actually pretty good if you shoot video.

An EM5 with external viewfinder loses its main advantage over the EM1 as it becomes clumsy and bulky.  There are many other considerations of course, the biggest of which is that there is now an even cheaper and well-spec'd EM10 to think about...

Sorry, mean endearing.   Sometimes get mumble fingers.

Don't get me wrong the em-1 is a better camera.    If the bloody thing would tether and track focus I'd sell all of my canons and I got a lot of canon stuff and I never sell any equipment.

Not that the OP asked, but honestly the best camera in m43 for a working pro is the panasonic gh3s and 4's.   They're not pretty, kind of like a smaller 5d2, but bang for the buck they roast anything out there and their video is off the scale amazing.  Their lens set is higher quality and has beautiful roll off, but they also need to tether and using wi-fi tethering in a professional situation is not reliable.

I disagree about the vf4 on the em-5 because it's not heavy and makes the camera a lot more useful, except you lose the hot shoe.

The gh3/4 has a lot of buttons though they are entirely intuitive and it also has touch screen and the best menu system in the biz.  Let's be honest olympus menu system is a nightmare.

Also the gh3/4 autotracks good.  Not AA fuel dragster good, but equal or better to a canon 5d2.  It smokes the olympus on autotracking.

The main reason I suggested the op go with another em-5 is

1.  It's great having one system with 1 interface and set of controls.  If I use the em5 I'm always thinking about how to turn on the em-1.

2.  If you don't like it and want to sell it off for another camera you won't lose much.

3.  I believe it's a prettier camera and shoots a prettier file.

IMO

BC

« Last Edit: May 17, 2014, 06:07:55 PM by bcooter » Logged

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« Reply #72 on: May 18, 2014, 11:53:46 AM »
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I'm starting to wonder if I have some as yet undiagnosed co-ordination problem. No one seems to mention the - to me - atrocious handling characteristics of the EM5. I'm continually finding myself accidentally in some unrequested mode. The tight grouping and anaesthetised feeling of the control set on the right rear of the camera is a constant menace.

The four directional control buttons are simply a joke if you're looking through the VF and trying to steer the (now, thankfully, reduced) focus box around. Well, not such a joke if you lose the shot whilst looking at the grid which has accidentally appeared: annoying to say the least. I use a Capture Clip to hold the camera on a backpack harness and when removing it to shoot it's 50/50 whether I'll have accidentally hit the OK/menu/info buttons.

Much as I appreciate the quality of the camera's files and the overall reduction of the system size compared to my FF gear - which I hardly use any longer - the EM5's handling can fairly be described as utterly hopeless, particularly (but by no means exclusively) when trying to shoot wildlife where rapidity is often critical.

The preceding by no means covers the range of constant annoyances this camera generates, such as various info modes appearing and disappearing in the VF as one accidentally activates a minute, numb, button. And I have small hands...

Then there's the firmware.

I've skipped the EM1 partly because I find that succumbing to the "upgrade" hysteria wearisome, partly for economic reasons (I'm poor) and partly because I suspect that the third generation of these cameras may exhibit improved ergonomics: which wouldn't be difficult. Better VF aside, I  see no compelling reason to buy an EM1.


Roy
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« Reply #73 on: May 18, 2014, 01:11:02 PM »
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I'm starting to wonder if I have some as yet undiagnosed co-ordination problem. No one seems to mention the - to me - atrocious handling characteristics of the EM5. I'm continually finding myself accidentally in some unrequested mode. The tight grouping and anaesthetised feeling of the control set on the right rear of the camera is a constant menace.

..........snip..............

The preceding by no means covers the range of constant annoyances this camera generates, such as various info modes appearing and disappearing in the VF as one accidentally activates a minute, numb, button. And I have small hands...

Then there's the firmware.

I've skipped the EM1 partly because I find that succumbing to the "upgrade" hysteria wearisome, partly for economic reasons (I'm poor) and partly because I suspect that the third generation of these cameras may exhibit improved ergonomics: which wouldn't be difficult. Better VF aside, I  see no compelling reason to buy an EM1.


Roy




I think the em-1 is best served when you move the focus points on the lcd as a touch screen, which has it's plus and minus, but other than the track pad it's not that difficult.

The olympus cameras are hard to set up with their menu system but once done, it becomes intuitive.

Actually nearly all cameras have autofocus glitches in set up.  FF mirror box cameras don't cover the full frame and usually require two functions to make work, smaller formats are a little better depending on brand, even touch screen smart phones combines focus and exposure in one tap which isn't always the plan.

The gh3/4 has the most intuitive focus and interface as any camera I've used with a combination of well though out hard buttons and a very intuitive menu, along with a touch screen overview window.

There are three options today, touch screen like the leica T that is smart phone like, traditional buttons like on the gh3/4 that hopefully are well placed and thought out or a combination.

Actually 4 focusing options, just set it on manual and use your eyes.  In the dslr world that's difficult because of servo lenses and overly sharp viewfinders that don't give a true read.

A manual lens lie a voigtlander on a mirrorless camera is easier to work manually.

If the em-5 has any issue to me it's the track focusing is poor and it's about 10% too small, but overall it's a good camera with a good lens set.

IMO

BC

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« Reply #74 on: May 18, 2014, 02:35:41 PM »
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I agree with BC about the E-M5's slightly-too-small size. Can't say I've had any handling issues with it, though, other than needing to be precise in pushing the up/down/left/right buttons. For manual focusing I find it superior to the E-M1 due to the placement of the top deck function button, which I use to switch focus magnification on & off. I do this with my index finger, using my middle finger to fire the shutter. The same technique works with the E-M1 but the buttons don't fall as naturally to hand. Otherwise, though, the E-M1 is a bit more polished as a camera. It feels about right size-wise. I've found the intervalometer very useful & versatile for time-lapse sequences. I've also been pleasantly surprised by how well the batteries hold up in constant use...600–800 frame sequences, no problem, even in cold (~7° F) weather. The new electronic first curtain shutter option is nice for folks who've experienced "shutter shock" and all those otherwise concerned about it. Can't say I've seen it myself but vibrations are bound to exist when you have moving parts...so it's good to minimize them when you can.

I also agree with BC about the look of the two cameras' files. There's greater tonal separation/differentiation with the E-M5. Sensor differences, CFA differences...whatever it is I wish the E-M1 had the same look. Because of this I've delayed getting the E-M5 converted to IR-only use. Maybe I'll get the E-M1 converted instead...

-Dave-
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« Reply #75 on: May 18, 2014, 07:52:11 PM »
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The em-5 and em-1 have different sensors.  The 5 uses Sony, the 1 uses Panasonic, at least that's what I'm told.

I own both cameras, along with the gh3's.

My take is the em-5 produces a prettier file in the fact it's more color receptive and has a prettier texture than the em-1 which to me has more of a smoother, but global color.

The Em-1 is a  better camera, not as enduring as the em-5, but has a few more features, slightly larger and easier to use, focus is about the same.

I bought an Em-1 because it allowed standard 43 lenses and has a pc sync.   The lenses, I've forgotten about because the focus of 43 lenses wasn't great and since Panasonic has come out with fast 42.5 mm primes and soon a 150mm 2.8 the standard 43 lenses are becoming less needed.

The Em-1 also has a better viewfinder, really amazing viewfinder, but if you add the ev-4 clip on viewfinder to the em-5 you get the same results and the viewfinder goes up and down so you can shoot standard and also low like a waist level finder.

I don't understand the shutter shake people mention with the em-5 because I've never seen it.

Actually last Dec. I really was excited about the Sony A7 and tested it next to my em-5 numerous times.

This image was shot at the Sony store (right before they closed) and honestly the A7 had blur, the em-5 didn't.

This is not an artistic but interesting image as it was a room full of mixed lighting from tungsten to led's bouncing around and the em-5 was really pretty, the sony a7 was very global and kind of warm orange and working both later in Raw Developer I couldn't get the same results.

...

BTW this is cropped to about 2.3 of a frame

here it is at 1000 iso close to full rez.

http://www.russellrutherford.com/stony_store_large.jpg

To be fair both the em-5 and 1 focus very quickly, but neither track focus very well.

To track focus the only way I've made it work is to set it to single, and just touch, then shoot, touch then shoot and for medium speed subjects the em-1 will hit focus.

From em-1
...

My bottom line is both cameras are very good, shoot way above their format and both are close to equal to any less than 20mpx dslr made.

The em-5 is really inexpensive now about 1/2 the price of the 1 so with an ev-4 finder you probably have as good if not better camera than the em-1.

In fact the em-5 has more latitude than my 1dx

...

But before I spent the money, I would rent a em-1 from borrow lens and see for yourself.

I really have to admit that the em-1 is a very, very, very well built camera.

IMO

BC


Thank for this post.  I'm curious about the differences you see in colour handling between the two cameras.  What do you mean by 'global' colour?  Do you mean that the E-M1 doesn't differentiate colours as well as the E-M5?  Do you have an example?

Thanks for your help.
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« Reply #76 on: May 19, 2014, 01:51:36 PM »
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I have been on the fence between an EM-1 and Fuji XT-1 for a while now.  Would love any advice from people who have considered both.  I have an EM-5 right now with a good lineup of lenses.  I have enjoyed it, but on the other hand it seems the IQ isn't really any better with the EM-1 (it also sounds like EM-1 IQ is not really different from the EM-10, for that matter).  In addition, and this is hard to be scientific about, XT 1 images (I rented one) do seem a little more "3D", having more depth and dimension vs. a more "flat" image from m43 -- e.g., imagine round-the-house family images using the 23mm lens at f1.4; beyond just the shallow DOF, it feels like a "deeper" image, with a greater sense of near, medium, and far elements of the frame.  I assume this is due to the larger sensor.

But, I love the EM-1 build/layout and the 12-40 lens looks spectacular.  Decisions, decisions.  Any advice on how to tip the scales would be appreciated.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2014, 04:14:55 PM by thebatman » Logged
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« Reply #77 on: May 19, 2014, 04:18:49 PM »
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... I have an EM-5 right now with a good lineup of lenses.  I have enjoyed it, but on the other hand it seems the IQ isn't really any better with the EM-1.
For me and my EM5, my IQ issue is not what the sensor is capable of (I am quite satisfied with that), it is the OOF errors and missed opportunities with moving subjects like birds, where the PDAF system of the EM1 promises easily visible improvements.  More generally, the IQ issues that I think about in gear choices these days are the hard cases that are of relevance to me, not pixel-peeping the easy cases like studio test shots in the hope of distinguishing between "excellent" and "most excellent".

But I have no idea how the EM1 compares to the XT-1 on that score, or how important moving subjects are to you.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2014, 06:28:57 PM by BJL » Logged
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« Reply #78 on: May 19, 2014, 04:30:04 PM »
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...XT 1 images (I rented one) do seem a little more "3D", having more depth and dimension vs. a more "flat" image from m43 -- e.g., imagine round-the-house family images using the 23mm lens at f1.4; beyond just the shallow DOF, it feels like a "deeper" image, with a greater sense of near, medium, and far elements of the frame. I assume this is due to the larger sensor.

I don't think this is due to the sensor size in & of itself but rather to the different focal lengths required for a given field-of-view. I've noticed much the same effect using my Pentax 645D compared with, say, Sony's A7r (also using Pentax lenses, though not the same ones). The inherent optical magnification of a lens seems to contribute to the sense of spatial separation, or relative lack thereof, in photos taken with the lens. The greater the mag the greater the sense...but it's a subtle thing.

Despite the fact that I love m43 and rarely use my X-E1 (and will likely sell it in the near future), I'd suggest that if you're in the mood for an upgrade/change you give the X-T1 a shot. The E-M1 is IMO a better camera overall than the E-M5 but its image quality isn't "better" per se, just different.

-Dave-
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