Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 12 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Another 4900 horror story  (Read 14428 times)
Roger_Breton
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52


« on: January 28, 2014, 02:36:09 PM »
ReplyReply

I have an Epson 4900 purchased in July 2011.
Never had to clean it. Worked beautifully.
Diligently performed nozzle check at least twice a week.
In all, I can't I printed all that much.

But two weeks ago, I noticed a few lines missing in the Photo Black, on the nozzle check?
I curse the day I fired that pair-cleaning because as soon as it finished, the PK has stayed blocked, solid.

I read a lot on this forum and others, about this printer clogging problems, seeking a solution.

After exhausting all the usual, cleaning fluid, power cleaning and what not, I tried the Windex approach.
Didn't make a dent in the PK clog.

I bought the Service Manual online and tried my way to take the head apart, to clean it.
But after reassembling the unit back, I got a perfect blank nozzle check -- I sure cleaned it thoroughly!

So now, I have to try to figure what is it that is causing the total blank out.
Why aren't any heads printing at all.

The only cleaning solution I had on hand was 95% alcool, which I injected through the intakes on the top of the head.
The surface of the head itself looked pristine.

Perhaps, the 95% alcool solution wasn't a good idea after all?
But, as I was injecting the solution through all 10 intakes, I could it being sprayed in straight, parrallel drops on the other side of the head. This, told me that the head does not need to be changed. At least, from a mechanical point of view.

Perhaps when I reseated the Inking Assembly? But even then.

I plan to reopen the printer, to take the head apart once more, later on tonight, but this time, to inject simple water through the intakes (or distilled water), to see whether the head is now blocked or not, as a consequence of my attempts to clean it.

If it is not blocked then the problem could come from the Inking Assembly itself, I figure? Someone on this forum mentioned that a new one could be had for $180, which would be reasonnable, provided that this would fix the problem.

But, as you can see, I am no Epson technician.

Any suggestion is welcome.

Roger Breton



Logged
digitaldog
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9092



WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2014, 02:58:06 PM »
ReplyReply

As you may have read, I've had awful head clogging issues with my 4900. Today I went to print and did a nozzle check. The paper came out white, every nozzel completely clogged. Then I got this Maintenance 4000 error and I'm told to look in the manual about it. Couldn't find a thing.

I haven’t tried any cleaning outside what the unit can do by itself. Maybe I should try it, nothing to lose as this is a huge paper weight at this time. I have no idea how to go about taking anything apart and cleaning with Windex or anything else.
Logged

Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
BrianWJH
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 166


« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2014, 03:17:08 PM »
ReplyReply

But after reassembling the unit back, I got a perfect blank nozzle check -- I sure cleaned it thoroughly!


Roger, have you tried printing something larger than a nozzle check, an image for instance?

After flushing the printhead there will be some cleaning fluid in the head and possibly air in the dampers and possibly the ink lines as well.

Did the dampers look ok, worth checking for clogging in them as well while you have it apart.

I'd forget about power cleaning and try just printing images to see if you can prime the dampers and head with ink.

Brian.

Logged
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6931


WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2014, 03:52:54 PM »
ReplyReply

Cleaning interspaced with printing in repeated cycles usually works - after how many cycles depends on conditions. I suffer through this routinely when I am away from the printer for more than a week. So far I have been able to recover it completely, but it does cost ink and time. As I write I am in the midst of this and hope it works. If it weren't for the fantastic print quality (when it's tip-top) I'd trade it for a 3880, also a great printer.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6931


WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2014, 04:44:27 PM »
ReplyReply

Quick follow-up: Completely recovered from a three week absence. Took two full cleanings (means all channels), two pairs cleanings, two intermediate prints and three nozzle checks, but it worked.

I would not recommend to anyone taking these machines apart in an effort to self-service, nor would I try injecting anything into them that Epson has not recommended either as a fluid or a self-implemented procedure, and I say this notwithstanding all the previous goings-on in the now (in)famous 7900 thread - with due respect to the bravery of the innovators. I just have a perception from all I've read and been told that there's a whole lot one needs to know and will neither be told or find out about these printers before having enough information and confidence to tinker successfully. It is extraordinarily intricate technology in design, materials and manufacture.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
digitaldog
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9092



WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2014, 05:07:59 PM »
ReplyReply

Thanks Mark, I'm not touching it.
Logged

Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
jrsforums
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 736


« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2014, 05:24:45 PM »
ReplyReply

In my, personal, experience....a total dropout is usually air, not clog.  Happened to me after flip flopping blacks.  The way I found to clear it was to use the service program to do an initial charge (lots of ink) on the bank with the blacks.  Needed a few addl cleaning, but recovered what I had thought was a totally lost printer.

For the last month, I have been using the Harvey Head Cleaner to daily print a noozle check.  So far it seems to do the trick.  Humidity in room has varied from 40 to 25 (gotten a bit cold in NC).  I have had a few blips, but auto noozle check/clean, with print and the turn off/on for a while cleared these quickly.

John

PS....Mark....might be solution to 3 week trips..??
Logged

John
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6931


WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2014, 05:46:22 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi John,

Thanks, but after several cleanings without any other intervention I'm fine, so I should just stick with that.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
davidh202
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 546


« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2014, 06:49:19 PM »
ReplyReply

First off... you panicked ! Like many of the others who have a channel 'drop out',  have now possibly done irreparable damage to the head than it might be able to recover from!
As Mark Segal said   turn to the infamous 7900 thread if you want some reading material on what people refer to as "clogs".  http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=61585.0
 
A complete channel drop out is not a clog per say it is a lack of ink flowing to the head, usually caused by too many pairs cleans  in a row, or back suction when switching black inks. The best way to deal with that before any other attempt is made, is to turn the printer on and off to recharge the lines and drive ink into the head, and then print some test prints on plain office paper to get ink flowing again ...if necessary repeat a couple of times and it will usually come back on line.
If you have not done damage to the head with what you already did, then it is necessary to recharge the head with ink with an initial charge like the first time when the printer was new. it is the only way to force the printer to push fresh ink beyond the dampers and into the head before you attempt to print. Printing with empty ink nozzles will burn them out if it hasn't happened already.
Hope you get it going again, and the head is not destroyed !  

Good luck,
David
Logged
hugowolf
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 629


« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2014, 07:04:55 PM »
ReplyReply

In my, personal, experience....a total dropout is usually air, not clog.  Happened to me after flip flopping blacks.  The way I found to clear it was to use the service program to do an initial charge (lots of ink) on the bank with the blacks.  Needed a few addl cleaning, but recovered what I had thought was a totally lost printer.

For the last month, I have been using the Harvey Head Cleaner to daily print a noozle check.  So far it seems to do the trick.  Humidity in room has varied from 40 to 25 (gotten a bit cold in NC).  I have had a few blips, but auto noozle check/clean, with print and the turn off/on for a while cleared these quickly.

John

PS....Mark....might be solution to 3 week trips..??

I have had similar experiences with the 9890. One of my original reasons for buying it was fewer reports of clogging, but I am now beginning to feel that was purely due to fewer numbers sold.

I have had three colors drop on an MK/PK switch; then another color totally drop out during the cleaning to clear the original clog.

When it got really cold here in Virginia, I started to have intermittent lines drop out, even during printing sessions, I would print six 24” x 36” prints, then do a nozzle check print after lunch, only to discover another color totally dropping out. I could have a couple or three lines not appearing in one color, only to discover everything clean the next morning without any cleaning or printing in between.

There are not many printers that have a menu option for doing a nozzle check before every print.

My studio, in the winter varied between 18% and 35% relative humidity. I used a passive system of wet towels (re-wetted three or four times a day) to keep humidity levels at some reasonable level. A week ago, I bought a 5 US gallon evaporative humidifier, and although it hasn’t been long enough to say everything has been cured, there hasn’t been a single line drop out since. I am hopeful. I think humidity levels are a bigger factor than regular printing. I print daily, but not frequently on weekends.

Brian A
Logged
jrsforums
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 736


« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2014, 08:06:10 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi John,

Thanks, but after several cleanings without any other intervention I'm fine, so I should just stick with that.

I meant the Harvey, not the initial charge....
Logged

John
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6931


WWW
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2014, 08:24:21 PM »
ReplyReply

Yes, thanks, I figured as much. Again, a product that may work, but Epson has not specifically recommended. Not necessary when home, because running a print or two every three days is sufficient to keep all channels intact. After a long period of absence, whatever ink has dried in the system does get resolved with a few regular cleanings and intervening prints.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
jrsforums
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 736


« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2014, 08:27:26 PM »
ReplyReply

Point is, the HHC can be turned off when you are home and only used when you are not going to print for some time.  Just load some copier paper and let it print every day.
Logged

John
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6931


WWW
« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2014, 08:46:27 PM »
ReplyReply

And how long have you been using this stuff? Any idea what it may do to the system after considerable usage?
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
BrianWJH
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 166


« Reply #14 on: January 28, 2014, 08:55:10 PM »
ReplyReply

Mark, HHC is a software program that automatically prints using a user defined schedule and the printers inks and loaded paper, nothing else.

Obviously the computer and printer must be turned on to work, so there is the issue of leaving both connected and running if you are in an area or season where lightning strike may be a problem.

Brian.
Logged
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6931


WWW
« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2014, 08:58:36 PM »
ReplyReply

Brian, OK, thanks for the clarification. I thought this was a cleaning fluid of some kind. All reservations withdrawn. Could make sense. Except in my personal case, I have such a backlog of printing to do that as long as I am around here there will be no issue using the machine, and when I am not around it is best shut off.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6931


WWW
« Reply #16 on: January 28, 2014, 09:00:58 PM »
ReplyReply

PS. Just checked the website and see it is Windows only. That cuts me out of it. I don't do Windows any longer.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
HSakols
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 379


« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2014, 08:44:20 AM »
ReplyReply

I'm going to be the sacrificial cow.  I just received some empty carts and cleaning fluid yesterday for my 4800.  I'm going to first let the cleaning solution sit for a few days and then flush. I do plan to replace with Epson Inks despite my tirade earlier of third party inks - sorry Jeff.  Anyway if that doesn't work I'll throw the printer in the Merced River and let it soak for a while.  I hope I don't screw thing up too badly. 
Logged
francois
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6819


« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2014, 10:31:42 AM »
ReplyReply

You might want to read Dan Berg's recent experience.
Logged

Francois
Garnick
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 295


« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2014, 10:39:37 AM »
ReplyReply

As I had mentioned in a recent post and another thread, my 9900 is prone to "nozzle gaps", as I now refer to them.  It seems that the word "clog or clogging" has been replaced by various descriptions of the same symptom.  However, all of that aside, I recently did a "K" switch(both directions) and when I returned to PK I soon noticed a problem in the PK nozzle.  After one pairs cleaning the PK nozzle experienced a complete dropout.  For some time now my routine in such a case is to remove the culprit cartridge, agitate gently and then re-install.  I then shut down the printer, let it sit for a couple of minutes and restart.  The restart forces the printer to re-pressurize the ink carts as normal, since I believe most times these situations are caused by lower pressure in one or more carts.  After the restart I did one pairs cleaning and the following nozzle check was perfect.  The PK was printing 100%.  I think David mentioned this in his recent post as well, so it's not a new procedure by any means.  I used to tear my hair out and turn the air blue while running cleaning cycles, eventually power cleanings, until I finally decided to chill out and let the printer do the same.  Less stress on myself and the printer as well.  Now this may not work in every situation, but I've found it to be the answer to a complete dropout almost 100% of the time.  And as Mark mentioned, always try to run a full colour print between cleaning cycles.  That tends to keep all nozzles active and fewer chances of further problems.

Gary
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 12 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad