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Author Topic: Epson R3000 how reliable  (Read 3898 times)
PharmGeek
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« Reply #40 on: February 20, 2014, 01:04:35 PM »
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huge help....proactive ideas based on actual experience gotta help.

I will leave it on...I think it goes into some sort of sleep mode at some point....ill probably read the manual in full cause I am always a geek like that....it is painful though.

Ill post back any of my experience...sorry to hear about your repair issues, ugh...
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philbaum
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« Reply #41 on: March 04, 2014, 11:53:40 AM »
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I've had my R3000 for 15 months now (gee, is this how it feels at an AA meeting???)

i've done a lot of canvas printing on it and sold about 80 prints over the last year.

Am amazed at the fine detail of the r3000, and the roll feed built into the machine works quite well - only used for canvas rolls so far.  I go thru a 20' roll like you wouldn't believe.  Recently bought a 3880 because you can buy 40' rolls for them and cut them into sheets - larger print size.

Had a problem with clogs on the 3000 the last few months, that is, when i could come back after not using the printer for a few days, it would not pass a nozzle check.  Found i could clean the nozzles easily with 3 or 4 nozzle checks, or if needed a "cleaning".  Finally found a youtube video by Jose R.  that showed how to clean the purge pad /capping station by carefully inserting an ink cleaning solution or windex, and then blotting it out with bounty brand paper towels. 

After i did the purge pad cleaning several times, the 3000 now passes nozzle checks again with no difficulty, even after leaving it for a week with no activity. 

If you're going to buy a professional quality grade printer - learn how to maintain it, and that includes cleaning the purge pad area (as i have learned) on a regular basis.  There are all sorts of videos to explain this maintenance on youtube and at third party ink suppliers like inkjetmall.  Lots of waste ink goes thru the purge pad on a regular basis, i.e. everytime you change the type of black ink, and also anytime you do nozzle cleaning - that all goes thru the purge pad.  Cleaning the purge pad on a regular basis helps prevent clogs and ink drops on media.

best wishes

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250swb
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« Reply #42 on: April 18, 2014, 10:30:16 AM »
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I've got to say that not all of the 'if you do this it will work' advice rings true from my experience. After all, if an Epson techie can't get a printer running who can?

Sure enough my R3000 ran reliably for over two years, some heavy use, some infrequent use, but it would always switch on and print and only once needed a nozzle clean. Then it stopped printing black, one print it was OK, the next nothing. Still under an extended warranty Epson came and collected it and replaced it with a newly refurbished machine, and it took the techie two hours of nozzle cleaning to get the replacement running, and again it was the black ink. This machine ran well for a fortnight, then yet again the black stopped printing, so the techie arrives with another 'new' machine complete with workshop test prints and everything, and again the techie couldn't get the black to print. After sloshing another 200 worth of ink through the machine it finally worked. Until last week.

Now while Epson used some of their own ink in the cleaning, in between when it needs doing a number of times before I'm justified in ringing the Help Desk it's my ink. And it comes to the point when the cost of the wasted ink is greater than the cost of the machine. So I bought a Canon printer, and I have an R3000 waiting for a cure, for somebody from Epson to tell me what can be done about it. Oh, and the funny thing is, it's now out of warranty  Cheesy

Steve
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