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Author Topic: Fuji X-T1 review  (Read 16202 times)
Spinifex
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« on: February 17, 2014, 06:10:10 PM »
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First of all, thank you for the review: it will be much more difficult to keep my hands off a X-T1 now.

I just have one nitpick: there is a third weather-sealed lens that will be released, the 18-135mm.

Quote
Fujifilm is launching three weather-resistant zoom lenses to complement the X-T1 camera, these will all be available during 2014, with the XF18-135mm launching in June. The three lenses are the XF18-135mmF3.5-5.6 R OIS WR, XF16-55mmF2.8 R OIS WR and the XF50-140mmF2.8 R OIS WR.

Source: http://www.fujifilm.com/news/n140128.html
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Pelao
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« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2014, 07:15:07 PM »
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A good review Nick - as per your usual standard it's all useful.

It makes an interesting read placed against your two-part X-Pro 1 review.

At a Toronto launch event the Fuji Guys insisted that the OVF remains a key part of their plans. This should prove interesting in future models, such as the X-Pro1 successor.

One thing that I feel doesn't get enough attention is the ability to add overlays to Fuji's OVFs. I don't think anyone else does this, and it's a superb feature - especially the histogram.

I agree with you about the EVF. I'm not a huge fan of EVFs, but this one really impressed me. It wasn't simply the size and clarity (both outstanding), but also the realistic rendering. Overall this new X is, as you say, very together, and very fast. For some this will make a real difference.

The other thing I'd add is that in use I found that the X-T1 is no smaller than the X-Pro 1: the hump creates a bulk that in my view makes up for the slightly smaller core body size. In bag or hand there isn't much difference, though the X-Pro1 is  less noticeable.

The Fujifilm people seemed determined to make cameras for photographers.  Grin
« Last Edit: February 17, 2014, 09:34:25 PM by Pelao » Logged
MarkL
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« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2014, 12:46:30 PM »
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At a Toronto launch event the Fuji Guys insisted that the OVF remains a key part of their plans. This should prove interesting in future models, such as the X-Pro1 successor.

One thing that I feel doesn't get enough attention is the ability to add overlays to Fuji's OVFs. I don't think anyone else does this, and it's a superb feature - especially the histogram.

I love this feature, it is like a head-up display and very customisable. Setting exposure is great just tweaking the exposure compensation until no clipping on the histogram occurs all with an OVF.
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Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2014, 02:31:58 PM »
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Very enjoyable review, thanks!
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2014, 04:28:53 PM »
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I can just join the rave - not about the X-T1, bute X-E2, which I own and which made
my step into serious digital imaging beyond compacts a pure joy -
the X-T1 seems to be the natural successor so far,

BUT:

Coming from the Mamiya 7 ii I'm looking forward to a mix of an X-T1 and the X-pro1 (X-Pro2 ?) coming hopefully
one day with hybrid viewfinder, kick ass autofocus and weather sealing.

Good times to go digital !

But I'll keep my film cameras anyways - and probably even go for an additional 4x5" view camera ...

Cheers
~Chris
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barryfitzgerald
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« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2014, 07:39:43 AM »
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Interesting review.
I do wish Fuji had gone with mechanical focus very surprised they went fly by wire for products like this.
Leaving that to one side, the lack of proper flash is really one of the show stoppers for me.

Fuji really need to get that sorted out and fast. They have some great ideas but they have to nail the flash side and they have not. I suspect it's putting many people off of looking at the X system.
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Rob C
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« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2014, 08:22:35 AM »
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Not having a flash would be one thing in its favour, were I in the market. The Nikon D200 has a flash, and that serves the noble purpose of rendering the full use of shifting/tilting lenses impossible.

Actually, if I didn't already own more photographic junk than I need, the X-T1 might have been a very attractive proposition.

Rob C
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barryfitzgerald
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« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2014, 01:40:29 PM »
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Rob the issue isn't so much the X-T1 not having a built in flash (personally I like a built in flash for off camera flash control, you don't want it don't use it Canon FF snobbery IMO - Not directed to you I would add)

Fuji only have basic TTL flash, no HSS, no wireless at all, and re-branding a Sunpak flash and doubling the price isn't convincing either.
If Fuji want to tempt DSLR users then they're going to have to address this, and until they do my wallet remains firmly shut
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Petrus
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« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2014, 01:47:18 PM »
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I do wish Fuji had gone with mechanical focus very surprised they went fly by wire for products like this.

Mechanical focus rules out fast autofocus.

Guess which is more important nowadays?

Can not have both.
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2014, 01:49:42 PM »
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Off camera wireless TTL flash and tethering is needed - I hope they add it in the next evolutionary step.
Would be cool to get hypersync compatibility.
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barryfitzgerald
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« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2014, 02:18:00 PM »
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Mechanical focus rules out fast autofocus.

Guess which is more important nowadays?

Can not have both.

Not sure what lenses you've been using but that doesn't add up in my experience across many lens mounts.
Yes you can have both, actually screw drive lenses tend to be faster for AF than in lens motors (in many cases)

And all of those are mechanical focus. In fact very few lenses are fly by wire in DSLR land, a few Canon STM's not much more.
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Vladimirovich
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« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2014, 02:38:35 PM »
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And all of those are mechanical focus. In fact very few lenses are fly by wire in DSLR land
so all those ring USM lenses are actually w/ old mechanical helicoids still ? and USM motors just rotate old helicoid ?
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barryfitzgerald
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« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2014, 04:51:55 PM »
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so all those ring USM lenses are actually w/ old mechanical helicoids still ? and USM motors just rotate old helicoid ?

I don't use Canon much (the odd time), I have used Sony/Pentax and Nikon
AF-S lenses all the ones I've used are mechanical linked, most of the Pentax lenses are screw drive anyway, Sony SSM and SAM are mechanical linked as are all the screw drive lenses.
Only a few USM lenses I've used are fly by wire 85mm f1.2 being one example, but most are not unless I missed something which I doubt.

Most of the ILC lenses are fly by wire. Olympus were doing fly by wire with the original 4/3 mount.
No idea why Fuji would copy this the X series is supposed to be something different. I'd wager 90% of people prefer mechanical focus v fly by wire.
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Vladimirovich
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« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2014, 05:05:39 PM »
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I don't use Canon much (the odd time), I have used Sony/Pentax and Nikon
well we can discount old screw driven designs really... so most of the modern lenses are in fact by wire.
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barryfitzgerald
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« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2014, 05:21:52 PM »
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well we can discount old screw driven designs really... so most of the modern lenses are in fact by wire.

That is not correct:
http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/26428/how-does-a-fly-by-wire-focusing-lens-work

Function: Normally the focus ring is mechanically connected to the inside of the lens so that when you turn the focus ring some of the lenses inside the lens move directly. With focus-by-wire the movement of the focus ring is measured electronically, and then a motor moves the lenses inside.
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ndevlin
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« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2014, 06:48:25 PM »
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To be honest, I'm surprised anyone has any interest in hand-held flashes via any of the goofy TTL systems.  If you're going to light, light properly.  Get a set of Lumopros and some pocketwizards.  All for the price of two of Canonikon's ridiculous top-end flashes.  Or, since you're going to need grip gear with real mods, get a couple of Einsteins and their amazing at-camera remote system.

Unless you're shooting weddings, or news, I can't see the need or use for any of the mainstream flash systems. And I say that having spent $$$ on an SB 910.

[on reflection this is a bit harsh. Just bc I don't like these systems doesn't mean some don't find them useful.  My better answer is that I suspect Fuji will issue a flash of the sort you have in mind.  I don't know that, but they didn't put all those contacts on top of the X-T1 to power that dinky included flash. There's likely to be a system-flash in the future, is my guess.]

Which is why I think the flash sitch is a non-issue.    

Besides, Fuji gives you a nifty little flash which runs off the camera's batteries, making it highly pocketable and fine for fill or triggering remote.  

Just my 2c.

- N.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2014, 11:06:13 PM by ndevlin » Logged

Nick Devlin   @onelittlecamera
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« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2014, 06:50:00 PM »
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As for manual focus:

- fly-by-wire kind of sucks, yes

- the two-image system in the EVF is the best focus-aid systems I've ever used, by far

- manual focus is mostly a moot point nowadays

- N.
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Nick Devlin   @onelittlecamera
barryfitzgerald
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« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2014, 06:28:36 AM »
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It depends what you do. For weddings and portraits there is a need for a proper flash system. And whilst I've no problems setting up some Yongnuo's inside (or outside) for lighting on the cheap, there are obvious scenarios where a proper dedicated flash wireless system can be useful (it's easy and quick)

1994 Minolta brought out wireless flash, and in 2014 it's something that can't be overlooked on Fuji'x X series.
Likewise HSS, there are workarounds like ND filters. But HSS is again very useful in some situations esp for fill flash outside.

Fuji will have to add this functionality either with firmware (if they can) and on dedicated flash units too.
Non issue for landscapes, but many of us want an interchangeable camera system that is flexible enough to take on many tasks. It's really something Fuji should have looked at from day one.

In other areas it looks like a nice enough camera even though I tire a bit of the retro theme.
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jjj
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« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2014, 07:42:49 AM »
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To be honest, I'm surprised anyone has any interest in hand-held flashes via any of the goofy TTL systems.  If you're going to light, light properly.  Get a set of Lumopros and some pocketwizards.  All for the price of two of Canonikon's ridiculous top-end flashes.  Or, since you're going to need grip gear with real mods, get a couple of Einsteins and their amazing at-camera remote system.

Unless you're shooting weddings, or news, I can't see the need or use for any of the mainstream flash systems. And I say that having spent $$$ on an SB 910.

[on reflection this is a bit harsh. Just bc I don't like these systems doesn't mean some don't find them useful.  My better answer is that I suspect Fuji will issue a flash of the sort you have in mind.  I don't know that, but they didn't put all those contacts on top of the X-T1 to power that dinky included flash. There's likely to be a system-flash in the future, is my guess.]
Harsh indeed many folks use flash outside of news and weddings and can light properly too.  Tongue

And high speed flash sync which isn't possible with "proper' lighting is incredibly useful and is something I use all the time. Essential for photographing dancers if you want to keep them sharp for exampl and is also great for being able to use shallow depth of field without faffing around with NDs. Which also make critical focusing rather tricky, so HSS is very handy for creatively lit portraits outdoors.
Not to mention being able to easily add a little bit of pop with fill flash without compromising other settings.

« Last Edit: February 20, 2014, 08:00:42 AM by jjj » Logged

Tradition is the Backbone of the Spineless.   Futt Futt Futt Photography
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« Reply #19 on: February 20, 2014, 07:58:28 AM »
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I've had a play with this camera and was impressed by lots of things, in particular the large viewfinder, which is almost as big as those on the 40 year old OM film cameras design - which are also tiny and being 35mm full frame. I've always found it frustrating using other much bigger cameras with poorly designed smaller viewfinders. So thumbs up to Fuji for finally catching up with an antique design.  Wink
Speaking of that excellent design, why didn't Fuji copy the OM cameras ergonomic shutter dial around lens mount, rather than the awkward to use retro shutter speed dial which doesn't even do incremental values. This means you need to use a far more ergonomic modern thumb dial to do 1/3 stop changes, which is inexplicably limited to a few values either side of the trendy but poorly designed shutter dial. Style/marketing over function.

The vertical battery grip also had buttons that don't match up with the horizontal layout and there were a couple of other areas where muscle memory will trip you up when accessing the same feature in a slightly different way as with the Menu Vs Quick Menu. This sort of inconsistency could be fixed or better made customisable with a firmware update. Firmware updates being something Fuji seem to be quite good at.
I also like the fact that you can set an EVF to mimic the the film style you have set and as a big fan of Provia, I quite looking at the world that way.
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Tradition is the Backbone of the Spineless.   Futt Futt Futt Photography
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