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Author Topic: Settings and Start-up for NEC MultiSync PA242W monitor with Spectraview II  (Read 1272 times)
Alan Klein
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« on: March 02, 2014, 09:48:20 AM »
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I just installed the monitor.  When I select sRGB, the image seems very dim, better in Adobe RGB.  Images on the web don't appear right in sRGB, better in Adobe RGB.  I thought images on the web were in sRGB.

1. Can someone explain the differences and why this is happening. ___________?  

Also, when would you use the other selections:
2. High Bright:  _________?
3. Full: __________?
4. DCI: ______________?

PS I have not used the Spectraview II calibrator yet.  The above performance is out of the box calibrated by NEC factory.

5. Any other start-up recommendations ______________?

edit: 4. corrected to read DCI.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2014, 09:59:15 AM by Alan Klein » Logged
Doug Fisher
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« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2014, 11:03:17 AM »
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It will probably vary for the personal taste/preference of each user, but I calibrate mine with a brightness of 105 to best match my printer output.  Many people have their monitor set way too high and then wonder why their prints come out too dark.

You are kind of spinning your wheels until you calibrate the monitor.  Go ahead and do that now.  With Spectraview and an NEC monitor, it is so easy.  Get your room illumination conditions correct, plug in your puck/hardware, start Spectraview and follow the prompts.  I started out with Monaco and then moved up to Gretag i1 Match software before going to Spectraview.  Spectraview is so much better because it doesn't have any steps that require the user to do interpretations.

One other thing, install the latest version of the free Multiprofiler software from the NEC website.  Go to the picture mode icon, then choose/check the "metamerism correction" box.  I don't know why Spectraview doesn't include this function but it is a "must" even after profiling with Spectraview (at least for the previous PA241W and PA271W versions).  There is another thread on this website that discusses it.

Doug
« Last Edit: March 02, 2014, 11:06:44 AM by Doug Fisher » Logged

Alan Klein
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« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2014, 09:40:56 PM »
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OK  I setup sRGB Emulation Target with Spectraview II.  Looks teriffic when looking on line.    So now what do I do?  When in import new photos into Lightroom,  which Target do I select to adjust in Lightroom? sRGB or Adobe RGB or what.  The what do I do with the NEC Targets?  Do I select another Target?  Is there a place I can link to that explains all this?
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Steve House
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« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2014, 06:21:21 AM »
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...So now what do I do?  When in import new photos into Lightroom,  which Target do I select to adjust in Lightroom? sRGB or Adobe RGB or what...
Depends on the destination of the image ... online viewing, printing by commercial print service, or printing on your own printer.
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Alan Klein
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« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2014, 07:57:20 AM »
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 I want to be able to edit for display on internet, make prints at home, make prints with outside lab and create slide shows for DVD display on my HDTV.  This in compounded that I shoot digital and film.

 I'll be using Lightroom 5 to edit. So what now? Do I use sRGB or Adobe RGB in Lightroom to edit. Which target do I use in Spectraview?? Do I have to calibrate each target for each use? Is there a link that explains workflows simply? I'm really confused.
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Steve House
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« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2014, 08:07:08 AM »
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Multiple output destinations means one standard workflow won't cut it.  Lightrrom uses the ProPhoto colourspace internally, slightly wider than aRGB.  If your output is going to be viewed on a standard monitor it needs to look good in sRGB - edit with your monitor set to that.  Most outside printers also expect files to be in the sRGB colourspace.  OTOH, if you have a good printer at home, it can usually reproduce more colours than sRGB, in fact, often more than aRGB - when getting a file ready to print, use aRGB or even the monitor's native wide gamut colourspace.  The idea is that the colourspace you use for your editing display should mimic the colourspace of the final destination so that what you see on your screen as you work looks like what the viewer of the final image is going to see.  Thast presumes you're viewing RAW images, if you have JPGs or TIFFs the colourspace is already baked in and you should view them in the same colourspace.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2014, 08:16:25 AM by Steve House » Logged
richardm33
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« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2014, 08:51:28 AM »
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The subject of color management is complex and benefits from some diligent study.

My I suggest a couple of good books on Color Management?

- Color Management for Photographers by Andrew Rodney ( a regular poster here )

- Real World Color Management 2nd Ed. by Bruce Fraser, et al
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digitaldog
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« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2014, 09:06:43 AM »
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The sRGB emulation selects a specific cd/m2 backlight intensity as it's emulating sRGB! I'm not surprised you see it dimmer. Load the SpectraView II software and calibrate it at the very least before you compare emulation to anything else (without calibration, that anything else is possibly and probably wrong).

As to it not being 'correct' for sRGB, you need to test this correctly using an ICC aware browser and a properly tagged image. Start here:
http://www.color.org/version4html.xalter
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
Alan Klein
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« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2014, 12:13:40 PM »
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Multiple output destinations means one standard workflow won't cut it.  Lightrrom uses the ProPhoto colourspace internally, slightly wider than aRGB.  If your output is going to be viewed on a standard monitor it needs to look good in sRGB - edit with your monitor set to that.  Most outside printers also expect files to be in the sRGB colourspace.  OTOH, if you have a good printer at home, it can usually reproduce more colours than sRGB, in fact, often more than aRGB - when getting a file ready to print, use aRGB or even the monitor's native wide gamut colourspace.  The idea is that the colourspace you use for your editing display should mimic the colourspace of the final destination so that what you see on your screen as you work looks like what the viewer of the final image is going to see.  Thast presumes you're viewing RAW images, if you have JPGs or TIFFs the colourspace is already baked in and you should view them in the same colourspace.

Steve:  I can use a calibrated screen for sRGB, Adobe RGB or in the monitor's Native (full).  So if I understand you correctly, I should use sRGB for editing in Lightroom for the internet.  However, my monitor NEC PA242W is a new wide gamut unit for photography.  Should I use sRGB or Native (Full)?   What about when I edit in  and for older type printers which I believe I have (Canon ip4600)?

Should I use Native (Full) if I intend to have an outside lab print it or should I check with them to see what they want? 
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digitaldog
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« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2014, 12:21:49 PM »
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Steve:  I can use a calibrated screen for sRGB, Adobe RGB or in the monitor's Native (full).  So if I understand you correctly, I should use sRGB for editing in Lightroom for the internet.  However, my monitor NEC PA242W is a new wide gamut unit for photography.  Should I use sRGB or Native (Full)?   What about when I edit in  and for older type printers which I believe I have (Canon ip4600)?

Should I use Native (Full) if I intend to have an outside lab print it or should I check with them to see what they want?  

Just learn to soft proof. Calibrate for a visual match to the print (pointless to do so for web, everyone is seeing something different anyway).
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
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