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Author Topic: large print presentation  (Read 699 times)
calindustries
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« on: March 04, 2014, 01:40:22 PM »
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Hello,
I apologize if this has been covered before, but I don't look in this section of the forum often. I have a 44"x70" print I want to display. I had thought about sandwiching it between plex and gatorboard with a plexi spacer between the print edges and the plex to give it some separation and then putting whole thing in a frame. I've almost exclusively always matted and framed prints with archival ragboard, but this is not financially feasible with a print this size.

Are there any suggestions as to how to pull this off?

Thanks,
Craig
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BobShaw
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« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2014, 02:36:40 PM »
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Hi Craig,
The print is larger than standard mat board size but you can get them custom made.
If you don't use mat board then you need spacers as you suggest. Spacer material is quite expensive.
If you want to do it on the cheap then you can join the mat board.

Frankly, it will look a lot better with a mat board surround than just filling the frame. That sort of looks like a poster.

The frame is going to be a significant cost anyway.

I don't know where you are but I'm in Australia.

You can get some indication of what it will  look like on the Quote and Simulation Tool at http://AspirationImages.com

Bob
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Website - http://AspirationImages.com
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Photography, Custom Framing and Printing, Sydney Australia
DeanChriss
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« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2014, 03:38:44 PM »
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If you want to do it on the cheap then you can join the mat board.


I've seen mats around huge maps and prints that are joined with an overlapping diagonal cut. If it's done right it you have to look pretty hard to find the joint.
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framah
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« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2014, 04:27:37 PM »
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Oversized matboards are standard at 48x96.. Rising and I think Bainbridge as well and Rising has a white at 60x108, but that is a raw edge piece so you would have to square it up yourself.

So, how are going to keep the print from bowing out in the middle? The spacers along the edges won't hold a piece flat THAT large. It will want to bow out on its own PLUS there will be static charge from the plexi pulling on it as well.

If this will be a temporary display, then you would be better off with a sandwich WITHOUT spacers. If it is to be permanent, then you would need to dry mount it flat onto the gatorboard.... which you should be doing anyhow.

ALSO.... with a piece of plexi THAT size, you better plan to deepen the rabbet on the frame to over lap it more than the usual 1/4". Plexi expands and contracts more than glass so you would need the deeper rabbet to hold it in place so it doesn't want to bow out as well as giving it more room to expand and contract.

Have fun.
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bill t.
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« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2014, 05:30:11 PM »
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There's a local gallery that has a selection of large, temnporary frames in the form of boxes about 1" deep, painted white on the inside, and covered with plex that fits into grooves near the top of the boxes.  These are particularly for the display of large prints from artists who are doing "significant" work and are therefore too poor to buy their own frame.

The prints are somewhat loose inside the the boxes, ripple and all, and surprisingly the effect is not too tacky.  The print is presented as a physical thing as much as the bearer of an image.  One could almost say "elegant" without choking too much.  The frame is just deep enough to prevent curl getting out of control, but not too deep to prevent it or to entirely subdue the artist merits of curl.

I'm gonna WAG that the prints are attached to the back of the box by tiny dabs of glue in various places, because the just appear to kind of float.  Careful removal with a long, sharp knife edge is indicated in that case.  Wonder if you could cobble together something like that with deep sided aluminum section frames?

A few years ago a few Soho galleries got into displaying large prints attached to the wall with push pins.  Not for everybody, you gotta be hip.
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Some Guy
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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2014, 07:33:06 PM »
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You can find various fabrics and suedes up to 54-60 inches wide, some out to 104 inches.  Just do a wrap of it onto something larger as a wrapped mat with roller or spray glue.  One frame supplier "Framing Fabrics" (wholesaler) does custom wrapped mats much the same way.  This might help:  http://www.pictureframingmagazine.net/Articles/W13002.aspx

SG
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