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Author Topic: How much do you spend on printing photos?  (Read 1250 times)
NickNod
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« on: March 05, 2014, 09:34:12 PM »
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Want to print some pictures and probably infor my first personal printers, so I'm curious about that how much do you spend in printing photos every year or month? Any great printer suggestion?
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2014, 04:25:26 AM »
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Do you seriously believe any one could answer a question like this in a way that would be at all useful to you or any one else?
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
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howardm
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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2014, 05:35:11 AM »
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Please realize that many/most of the users on this forum print at the professional/commercial level so there is a lot of
money spent on top of the line printers (Canon, Epson & HP in 17, 24, 44 inch size) and very expensive fine art paper & canvas.  This is not representative
of majority of the printing population which tend to use small $50-100 almost throwaway printers.

And then there are people like me, fine art printer wannabe's  Grin
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 05:59:13 AM by howardm » Logged
Dan Berg
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« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2014, 05:56:47 AM »
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Want to print some pictures and probably infor my first personal printers, so I'm curious about that how much do you spend in printing photos every year or month? Any great printer suggestion?

Over $10,000,does that help?  Wink
On a more serious note if you have a more specific question we would be happy to help.

To add,
Although cost is somewhere on the list of importance it is nowhere near the top. Cost really has nothing at all to do with why I print.
There are plenty of small printers in the $150 to $400 range. If your interest is in hi gloss I would go with one of the dye printers from either Canon or Epson.
They may not have the longevity of pigment ink printers but the output is just stunning on the right papers.
Maybe more important then researching printers and cost factors right from the start would be to educate yourself on the very important basics,especially color management and a color managed work flow.
Tons of videos here and elsewhere on the subject.
Once you get those basics down it will help in your search for the right equipment.
Check back and let us know how it is going.

« Last Edit: March 07, 2014, 02:15:33 PM by Dan Berg » Logged

JohnBrew
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« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2014, 06:26:35 AM »
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Heck, I don't want to know. Far too much, for sure. I don't need a reality check at this time  Grin.
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shadowblade
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« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2014, 07:16:43 AM »
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Printing's cheap.

Framing's the expensive part.
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framah
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« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2014, 08:45:22 AM »
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Printing's cheap.

Framing's the expensive part.

It's the only way I can afford my ML350!!!  Grin Grin
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« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2014, 08:49:08 AM »
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It's the only way I can afford my ML350!!!  Grin Grin

What's an ML350? A camera or a printer?

It's not the framing itself that's expensive - it's the UV-blocking, anti-reflection acrylic or glass panel you put in front of it!
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 09:55:20 AM by shadowblade » Logged
Some Guy
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« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2014, 10:08:03 AM »
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Printing's cheap.

Framing's the expensive part.

Ain't that the truth!  Last frame cost me $530 with my 25% discount applied.  About 23x34 inches or so (Frame, liner, fillet, and museum glass.  It's basically three frames in one.).

For the OP, probably $6,000 year alone in sundry printer inks, papers (I got a stash!), sprays, gels, profilers, printer software, frames, etc.  Have some special-order gels coming now too.

Heck, one Hograth picture frame lamp alone costs about $1,000.  Ain't a cheap hobby.

SG
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JeanMichel
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« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2014, 11:25:28 AM »
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Nick,
I assume that you are talking about personal photos, and that you are probably thinking of small prints such as 4x6 inches. A box of 100 4x6 inches paper is under $20 (Canada), so count on 15 to 20 cents per sheet for the paper, plus ink. The advantage of printing yourself is not a matter of cost-saving -- you can probably go to a print booth somewhere and get prints cheaper -- but in printing with long-lasting pigment inks on fairly long-lasting paper. So, first you purchase a bool or two, or one of the tutorials from this site to learn the basics of printing; then buy a printer that uses pigment inks (Epson, Canon, etc.), and have some fun printing.

Printing images is important if you want them to be available to be seen by yourself or your grand-children some years later. Prints will always be human-readable; digital files, even if still around, are only machine-readable and the machine to read you 2014 files may not exist int he future: Betamax tape player anywhere?

Jean-Michel
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framah
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« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2014, 11:38:34 AM »
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What's an ML350? A camera or a printer?

It's a Mercedes!!! Grin
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 11:40:14 AM by framah » Logged

"It took a  lifetime of suffering and personal sacrifice to develop my keen aesthetic sense."
DeanChriss
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« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2014, 12:13:18 PM »
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Want to print some pictures and probably infor my first personal printers, so I'm curious about that how much do you spend in printing photos every year or month? Any great printer suggestion?

Hypothetically, you decide to buy a printer. Depending on size they aren't so expensive. A good 17" model can be had for about the price of a mid-range DSLR. Of course you need paper, find the good stuff is pretty expensive, and as hard as you try not to buy every different size sheet and roll of each one you like, you eventually find it becomes necessary. You take a while to learn about color management and during the learning curve buy a better monitor and profiling equipment because of it, for about the price of a mid-range DSLR. At some point you are making great prints, loving it, and ordering ink and paper more often than you thought you would. By this time you've discovered how expensive matting and framing are and your walls are full of great prints. Right about now the fact that you can't leave these printers sitting unused for long periods begins to sink in. You've got to keep on making prints at a pretty good rate, so you decide you'll sell prints. What a freaking great idea, and it'll pay for all of this stuff! After investing the price of a small car in equipment and inventory, and alienating your family because it's all you've been doing, you're off to your first show. You sit in your booth glowing in gazillions of compliments and so-so sales. You learn about selling and what shows are good. Sales improve, and you set about lowering costs by learning to cut mats and do your own framing. Thousands of dollars later you're really saving money! Years later you actually do make enough to "pay for all this stuff", as your printer continues its demand to constantly spew ink and eat paper. To keep up with this demand, not to mention constantly needing new material to get past show juries, you have to spend a lot more time taking photographs. Now THAT's fun, if you are able spend enough time, and if you can stay productive. One day while driving to a show in an early morning thunderstorm it occurs to you that most of this has little to do with what you love about photography, and it's really hard work!
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 12:16:00 PM by DeanChriss » Logged

- Dean
bill t.
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« Reply #12 on: March 06, 2014, 01:36:22 PM »
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It's a Mercedes!!! Grin

How long has Mercedes been making printers?  Or do you have one of these.

To the OP:

1. I spend tons of money every month on media and ink.

2. You should get an Epson 3880.  It is the least-reviled printer ever to be discussed on this forum and it doesn't mind being neglected for long periods.

3. You can make really good prints on just about any printer for sale down at Best Buy, if you just try hard enough.
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2014, 02:38:52 PM »
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Hi,

I don't print that much, no more wall space…

I have an Epson Stylus Pro 3800. That one prints up to A2 and covers most of my needs. I guess I spend around 700$ on paper and ink each year. Printing at a pro lab may be cheaper, but I still feel I need a decent printer for proofing and the Stylus Pro does that and also covers most of my needs.

Best regards
Erik

Want to print some pictures and probably infor my first personal printers, so I'm curious about that how much do you spend in printing photos every year or month? Any great printer suggestion?
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PeterAit
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« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2014, 03:25:09 PM »
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Do you seriously believe any one could answer a question like this in a way that would be at all useful to you or any one else?

And writing actual English would help a bit.
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Peter
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« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2014, 04:09:04 PM »
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And writing actual English would help a bit.

Seemed pretty clear to me...
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2014, 07:37:38 PM »
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Once you've purchased the printer, you can count on costs averaging about $2.00 US per square foot.
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Some Guy
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« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2014, 07:53:34 PM »
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Once you've purchased the printer, you can count on costs averaging about $2.00 US per square foot.

Highly variable though.

I buy a box of Costco Kirkland Glossy 8x11.5 inch paper which costs me about $15 for 150 sheets to a box.   So 10 cents per sheet there.

My Canon uses refillable/resettable carts with OCP dye ink out of rjettek.com in Colorado.  A refill costs me 30 per cart and lasts for a long while vs. the $17 OEM cart.

I'd guess my printing cost to be around 13 cents per sheet on the Canon 9000 II.

Going with OEM ink and exotic papers, or the Epson printer with pigment ink, then yes, it can be more.

SG
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2014, 10:53:01 PM »
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I buy a box of Costco Kirkland Glossy 8x11.5 inch paper which costs me about $15 for 150 sheets to a box.

My favourite letter-sized stock. Smiley



Quote
My Canon uses refillable/resettable carts with OCP dye ink out of rjettek.com in Colorado.  A refill costs me 30 per cart and lasts for a long while vs. the $17 OEM cart.

No fair. Smiley


Quote
I'd guess my printing cost to be around 13 cents per sheet on the Canon 9000 II.

If you leave a half inch border, then you're really printing about half a square foot per letter-sized print.

Quote
Going with OEM ink and exotic papers, or the Epson printer with pigment ink, then yes, it can be more.

That's what I was referring to - a typical user with typical factory consumables.  I was probably a bit high with my estimate, but it's certainly a dollar a square foot for the average guy.

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bill t.
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« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2014, 11:15:35 PM »
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Don't forget to factor in:

-The per sheet amortization on the cost of the printer, based on it's estimated use over life.

-The cost of making the 2 to 5 proofs needed to produce a reasonably non-embarrassing print.

-The cost of the screen calibration system, which is essential.

-The cost of prints made for relatives and friends that you thought you would never have to make.

-The cost of psychiatric support needed while figuring out why your prints are too dark, or while listening to Uncle Bob tell you about the great prints he gets from Costco for next to nothing.

-The cost of the pimple-removing and fat-reducing software if you value your friends.

-The cost of some kind of system to organize and protect huge heaps of scratch-prone prints.

-The cost of your time which is the only place can really save some money.

-Etc.
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