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Author Topic: Self adhesive foamcore  (Read 1316 times)
steveclv
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« on: March 08, 2014, 09:09:11 AM »
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I purchased some sheets of a self adhesive 3mm foamcore that I am mounting my prints onto before they go into the frame.

The first 3 A4 size prints went on perfectly and then I tried an A3 and completely screwed it up and the foamcore is so sticky that there is no change of repositioning.

Is there a technique to use to align everything first time? Or am I better off with a dry foamcore and then use a 3M re-positionable spray adhesive?

Thanks

Steve
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jferrari
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« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2014, 09:26:31 AM »
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Have you ever installed laminate counter top material? Watch this video from 1:30 to 2:05. Use only light pressure until all dowels and air bubbles are removed. Good luck!     - Jim
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Paul2660
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« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2014, 09:28:41 AM »
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I would totally stay away from this for larger prints unless you have help.  As you point out, once the print touches, it's done. 

Also larger prints, 20 x 30 and up it's next to impossible to work with since you tend to get air bubbles no matter how hard you try.

Paul C
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Paul Caldwell
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steveclv
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« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2014, 03:05:25 AM »
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What technique would you use Paul for larger prints to stop them from buckling inside the frame?

Thanks

Steve
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Paul2660
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« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2014, 09:15:01 AM »
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Dry mount press.  Heat 122F. 5 minutes.  I use bienfang rag mount. 


If you don't have access to a press then Elmer's acid free strong spray adhesive.  Spraying is a mess but works and I have not seen a lot of problems with bubbling or releases.

The heavier cotton papers like Canson's platine will also handle a hinge mount up to about a 23 x 33.  300w
RC paper seems to always show some buckling over time.  I have been using Moan luster 300W recently with good results.   

Paul C
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Paul Caldwell
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framah
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« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2014, 11:11:09 AM »
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The best way to "align" everything is to NOT even try. Cut the FC larger than the print size, lay it down and burnish as required and then trim off the excess FC.

WAAAY quicker and  easier than trying to get the print EXACTLY in the right place every time. Never try to lay the print down all at once as that is the sure way to get air trapped under. Start at one end and work your way to the other end.
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steveclv
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« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2014, 04:31:34 PM »
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Thanks and I discovered a tip of rolling the print onto a postal tube and then using that to control it as you roll it out - I'll give this all a try tomorrow as I have some A2's printed and left to dry/settle over the weekend

Thanks

Steve
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bill t.
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« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2014, 02:35:47 PM »
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Be sure to have a sharp pin handy to ever-so-delicately pierce the print to let out trapped air.  Those trapped air bubbles look even uglier than a pin prick.  OK, who snickered?

This takes practice.  Don't use a hard tube.  Instead, arrange the print into a big U-shaped curve (not touching the foamcore) taped down at one end.  Grasp the loose end of the print with one hand.  With a cotton-gloved other hand, as you move the U of the print ever so slowly forward, push down on the print at the center, working the push out towards each edge.  1 inch at a time.  The top of the U will above the gloved hand.  Maintain the U curve bend as close to the point of print/adhesive contact as possible, that rigidifies the print as it goes down in a way that removes trivial, bubble-making ripple.  Gets harder towards the end.  Worked well for me using adhesive mount.  Except by a few years down the road most of those prints had developed really ugly air bubbles under glass.  Have a nice day.
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Justan
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« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2014, 03:12:52 PM »
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Another way is to lay the print face down on a clean flat surface and carefully apply the coated foam care to the print, starting at the edge closest to you and carefully pressing the foam core into to the print back from the edge nearest to you to the furthers away. Press from the middle to the outside and make several passes.

With the print lying flat on a hard surface it has less opportunity to trap air and as you gradually press the foam core to the back of the print that makes a path for air to escape.

Were it me, i'd toss the adhesive backed foam core and use a hinge mount instead.

Hinge mounts examples:

http://www.logangraphic.com/blog/2011/06/04/basic-hinge-mounting-for-picture-framing/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=116UJ1m71sM

It is also a great idea to use latex or similar exam gloves when handling any media related to photos and mounting. This kind of glove leaves no trace and won’t absorb oil and other noxious fluids from your hands.
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BobShaw
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« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2014, 11:16:16 PM »
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You use a press. If you don't want to do that then it's hinge tape and non adhesive but it will sag eventually.
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langier
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« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2014, 01:28:07 PM »
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Better than self-adhesive foam board is the heat-activated. All the benefits and a lot less hassle than tissue and self-adhesive. I've been using it for a few years now and would never go back!
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Larry Angier
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jferrari
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« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2014, 08:17:37 PM »
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Better than self-adhesive foam board is the heat-activated. All the benefits and a lot less hassle than tissue and self-adhesive. I've been using it for a few years now and would never go back!

Do you have any issues with warping especially on large (40" x 60") panels?
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