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Author Topic: Grids vs. Snoots  (Read 1553 times)
kevs
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« on: March 19, 2014, 12:21:34 PM »
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Do people get/ own both commonly? thanks.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2014, 09:25:29 AM »
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Except for shoots I make as needed (which is rare for me these days)  with cinefoil (http://www.amazon.com/Rosco-Matte-Black-Cinefoil-12/dp/B001KVMK38/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1395324517&sr=8-2&keywords=cinefoil) and gaffer tape,  I use grid spots as I prefer the quality of light they make.  I have 3˚, 10˚, 20˚, 30˚ and maybe a 40˚ grids  that fit pretty much every 7" diameter reflector that is designed to hold a grid.  I also use the Plume, ltd.  Grid Spot "Chimney (http://www.plumeltd.com/plumetools.htm) when I ned a tighter beam.

here's another very useful tool for using grids, The Balcar Dual Purpose Disk Reflector. As you see at http://www.ebay.com/itm/Balcar-Dual-Purpose-Disk-Reflector-CONTROL-ILLUMINATED-AREA-ON-UMBRELLA-GRID-/370961495657 this is a 7" diameter flat aluminum disk. To use it to reduce the illumination angle when using a grid, you put it in the grid holding reflector first and than snap the grid into the reflector. In practice it substantially reduces on the size of the spot lit area.but  it also reduces airflow around the flash tube and can make the reflector really, really hot to the touch so turn off your modeling lights if you can,  and either handle the reflector and grid with gloves or wait for it to cool down at the end of the shoot.

If you use Paul C. Buff monolights you can use the Balcar disk as an umbrella reflector but you'll need to drill a hole in it to accomodate the umbrella shaft.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2014, 09:27:02 AM by Ellis Vener » Logged

Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
kevs
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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2014, 12:08:18 PM »
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thanks Ellis, yeah, I have a box of that Cinefoil, but snoots you make eventually get damaged, and they hole is not a perfect round one. But it can work. Thanks for reminding me.

I just got Profoto D1's.

Some argue if you have grids, which I got all the ones they offer, 5, 10, 20 for D1, then you don't need snoots, your opinion?
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NashvilleMike
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2014, 12:10:14 PM »
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When I started out many moons ago, I had a few snoots, but once I got a set of grids, I never went back. Just prefer the light.

Since I'm a dual (lighting) system shooter (dynalite and elinchrom), I've got a myriad of grids lying around - a couple of full grid sets for the dyna heads and I have the big grids for the beauty dishes for the elinchroms. Honestly I could not produce what I do without grids.

Just one guys opinion...

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kevs
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2014, 12:39:43 PM »
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I hear you Mike, and with Profoto, I'll probably have many sets of grids, but what about snoots??

Don't they make that super crisp nose and neck shadow you cannot achieve with grids? That what I remember about using snoots years ago.

I left snoot for awhile as Lumedyne' snoot contraption was so clumsy.
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bcooter
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2014, 02:52:21 PM »
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I hear you Mike, and with Profoto, I'll probably have many sets of grids, but what about snoots??

Don't they make that super crisp nose and neck shadow you cannot achieve with grids? That what I remember about using snoots years ago.

I left snoot for awhile as Lumedyne' snoot contraption was so clumsy.

Grids work and I use them, though they have a lot of bite, depending on the fixture they mount on.   One way to smooth them out is to put 1/2 stop spun (under) the grid, though be careful about heat, with flash, be very careful with hot lights.

For the directional look your probably describing, nothing works as well as a fresnel.   Profoto made a great one, now I think they kind of make a generic one, Bron has thier flooter which is good, though if you are in a studio you can black out, the cheapest is a 1 or 2k arri tungesten.    You'll need power and the ability to work with the heat, but tungsten is beautiful with most digital, regardless of how it screws up the blue channel.



IMO

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robert zimmerman
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« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2014, 02:35:14 PM »
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I'm not sure about all the alternatives in the U.S. but in Europe Hensel and Bacht make really nice Fresnels with Profoto strobe heads built into them, which can be focused.
Very similar to working with an Arri 2,5 KW, but costs less because you can use them with a normal Profoto generator.

If budget allows for it, a Briese focus with a grid will also give you very directional, crisp light. Not as hot and spot-like as a fresnel, and way more flexible. It's extremely crisp without diffusion although the shadow edges are not as sharp as a fresnel. The grid will harden the shadows and with a silk behind the grid the light softens up a bit but the shadows stay defined. It's hard to beat for beauty and you can interchange strobe or HMI with the focus.

A classic gridded beauty dish is also nice if you're on a budget.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2014, 02:39:35 PM by robert zimmerman » Logged
Ellis Vener
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« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2014, 08:37:49 PM »
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With the B1's I recommend you use the Profoto Zoom Reflector 2 . The 7" diameter grids I use are mostly a Balcar set , except the 3˚ one which was a Speedotron product. Heat build up with the B1 is not as bad as it uses a 20 watt LED for a modeling lamp.
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Ellis Vener
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Schewe
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« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2014, 10:25:20 PM »
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For the directional look your probably describing, nothing works as well as a fresnel.

+1...a a fresnel lens setup is often optimal since you can seamlessly forus-defocus a light to cover the area you want. For strobes, they can be pricy and tend to be inefficient (meaning you lose a lot of stops) but the quality of light is very nice...
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« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2014, 06:24:47 AM »
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+1...a a fresnel lens setup is often optimal since you can seamlessly forus-defocus a light to cover the area you want. For strobes, they can be pricy and tend to be inefficient (meaning you lose a lot of stops) but the quality of light is very nice...

https://www.k5600.com/products/bigeye/index.html

These work well with Profoto Pro heads which have a bare-bulb flash tube/model light design.
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Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
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