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Author Topic: LR printing oddity  (Read 1843 times)
PeterAit
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« on: April 02, 2014, 08:41:58 AM »
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If I select (in the Page Setup dialog) landscape orientation, the LR print module displays the sheet on-screen in portrait orientation. If I select portrait, it is displayed in landscape. If it matters, I am using roll paper on a 7900 with a user-defined size).
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Peter
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Geraldo Garcia
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« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2014, 09:31:27 AM »
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Make sure that you have not swapped height and width on the custom paper settings. Some printers would not allow it, demanding a longer (or equal) height, but others would accept it. A custom paper with a width of 36 and a height of 24 will look landscape oriented when in portrait orientation.
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PeterAit
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« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2014, 09:51:54 AM »
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Make sure that you have not swapped height and width on the custom paper settings. Some printers would not allow it, demanding a longer (or equal) height, but others would accept it. A custom paper with a width of 36 and a height of 24 will look landscape oriented when in portrait orientation.

I don't think that's the problem. My printer driver (7900) won't allow widths greater than 24 inches, as that's the maximum size the printer can handle.
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Peter
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2014, 12:11:05 PM »
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What Geraldo says is accurate.  Example, if you create a custom paper size that is 14x11 instead of 11x14, the paper in “portrait” orientation is a landscape page, since it is 14” wide and 11” tall.  If then enable “landscape” LR will show the paper that way, which based on that paper size will appear as a portrait page.  Easily duplicated.

This is the only time I have ever seen what you describe.


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PeterAit
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« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2014, 11:09:34 AM »
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I am starting to think that the issue is how the term "width" is used. In some - probably most - situations, it is the horizontal size of a print when oriented properly for viewing, so a portrait print will always have height > width.and a landscape print width > height. For my printer (7900), width is always across the roll of paper, a maximum of 24", and height is along the length of the paper, essentially unlimited. So, the printer "width" could be the print "height." But now always. Now my head hurts!
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Peter
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Geraldo Garcia
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« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2014, 03:02:48 AM »
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I am starting to think that the issue is how the term "width" is used. In some - probably most - situations, it is the horizontal size of a print when oriented properly for viewing, so a portrait print will always have height > width.and a landscape print width > height.
For a printed image, yes, but for a blank sheet of papers is useful to dumb down and think as most drivers do: The height of the blank paper is always the longer dimension (if square it doesn't matter). So, if you need to print a 18x24" image on a 24" roll paper, you should set the custom size like this: Height 24", Width 18", Orientation Landscape.

If you swap the dimensions (and the driver allows it as Canon drivers do) the paper will be horizontal while in "portrait" orientation, so it is very easy to mess things up.
 
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2014, 05:28:58 PM »
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For a printed image, yes, but for a blank sheet of papers is useful to dumb down and think as most drivers do: The height of the blank paper is always the longer dimension (if square it doesn't matter). So, if you need to print a 18x24" image on a 24" roll paper, you should set the custom size like this: Height 24", Width 18", Orientation Landscape.

If you swap the dimensions (and the driver allows it as Canon drivers do) the paper will be horizontal while in "portrait" orientation, so it is very easy to mess things up.
  
To me it's easier to think of it in terms of the printer and of the image separately.  The width of the paper is always the width of the actual paper as it is placed in the printer. If you have a 24" roll loaded, then the width for any created size should be 24".  the height is either the actual height if a sheet, or the desired cut length if a roll.

Landscape and portrait orientation are instructions to the driver on how to orient the image on the paper that is being printed. So if I wanted a 18x24" print on 24" roll paper, my settings in a custom paper size would be width of 24", height of 18".  If my image itself was a landscape image, that orientation is the same as the paper, so I wouldn't select landscape, but leave it at portrait. If I were choosing one of Epsons built in preset sizes, I would choose from a 24" width option.

Paper sizes are created without regard to the final image that is being printed, just simply the size of the desired final print, with the width being the actual paper width as it is inserted in the printer.  Landscape and portrait are selected based on the orientation of the print as it relates to that piece of paper.  This is the confusing part because if you create a paper size that is wider than it is tall, and you print a landscape oriented image on it, the actual correct setting is portrait, because the image is in a portrait orientation to the piece of paper that is being printed.

If you transpose any of these items you can get some very strange results, such as nothing or only a small piece of the image being printed.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2014, 07:11:14 PM by Wayne Fox » Logged

Geraldo Garcia
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« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2014, 12:50:29 PM »
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To me it's easier to think of it in terms of the printer and of the image separately.  The width of the paper is always the width of the actual paper as it is placed in the printer. If you have a 24" roll loaded, then the width for any created size should be 24".  the height is either the actual height if a sheet, or the desired cut length if a roll.

Wayne,

Sure it makes sense and work, if your printer allows it. Canons and Epsons usually do, but HPs don't. If you try to crate a custom paper on an HP with the width larger than the length the driver refuses it. As I use printers from all three, I had to standardize a way of thinking that works for all. It makes less sense at first, but is quite simple and trouble free when you get it.
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2014, 11:30:12 PM »
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Wayne,

Sure it makes sense and work, if your printer allows it. Canons and Epsons usually do, but HPs don't. If you try to crate a custom paper on an HP with the width larger than the length the driver refuses it. As I use printers from all three, I had to standardize a way of thinking that works for all. It makes less sense at first, but is quite simple and trouble free when you get it.

I'm sorry the HP driver seems to be quirky. As far as "Epsons usually do", they work this way all the time.  You tell the printer  driver how big the piece of paper is you are printing on with the width corresponding to the width as it is inserted into the printer, and you orient the image accordingly.

I"m glad your work around solves your problems because of the HP, but for Epson users (and maybe canon, I don't have on of those to test), I would recommend following what I described.  I have had many calls and messages about issues with printing correctly on an Epson printer that were caused by transposing the width and height in the custom paper setup on a Mac, all resolved by doing it correctly.
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Geraldo Garcia
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« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2014, 02:07:44 PM »
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I'm sorry the HP driver seems to be quirky.

Well... As a long time HP user I can say that "quirky" is an understatement! Roll Eyes But on this specific matter I really think they did a good thing. Sure it sound stupid, but after you accept their way of thinking it really works well and is fail proof, as the paper and the image will always have the same orientation (portrait or landscape). Today I apply the same logic to Canons and Epsons without a problem.

Best regards.


 
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2014, 10:03:24 PM »
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Well... As a long time HP user I can say that "quirky" is an understatement! Roll Eyes But on this specific matter I really think they did a good thing. Sure it sound stupid, but after you accept their way of thinking it really works well and is fail proof, as the paper and the image will always have the same orientation (portrait or landscape). Today I apply the same logic to Canons and Epsons without a problem.

Best regards.

again, glad it works for you, I'm not doubting that, and glad that in your circumstance it makes your workflow easer.

But forums are all about many people trying to find answers, and despite your success, for an Epson user, the best practice is to make sure your paper width in a custom paper size matches the width of paper you are inserting in your printer.  If you transpose the width and height, it will eventually bite you and you'll get a great big piece of paper with a little 4x6 section of your print on it somewhere.  Seen it so many times I've lost count from customers and others who call me with this very problem .... including one of my employees today who has been told numerous times and still creates paper sizes based on the orientation of the print, not the paper that is being inserted.
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