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Author Topic: Zork Pro Shift Adapter in real life?  (Read 1971 times)
lowep
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« on: April 05, 2014, 11:22:14 PM »
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Has anybody actually tried using Zork´s Pro Shift Adapter for MF in real life rather than in theory?

I have one that I am thinking about using to attempt panorama stitched images with a Pentax lens on my Contax 645 that I have just taken out and am trying to figure out how to use.

So far I have figured out that it is not the same as the more elegant Zork Panorama Shift Adapter designed for 35mm cameras that includes a micrometer knob for very fine shift movements. Instead the shift is done by sliding the outer mount on a friction fit. To do this seems to require about the same pressure as I would expect to apply to turning a key in a VERY stiff lock and I am not sure how this could be managed without jolting the camera not to mention the tripod thus rendering the whole panorama exercise useless.

I have not found any instructions or guidelines so am not sure if I just happen to have ended up with a very stiff unit or am I doing something wrong, even after reading this useful review.

Maybe the camera should be welded to a heavy metal bench rather than mounted on a tripod to prevent it moving out of position while adjusting the adapter? Or perhaps it was never intended for panorama stitching just shift?

Any advice on how to use this would be most appreciated!
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rainer_v
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« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2014, 11:45:21 PM »
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this may depend on that the plate is really straight. my shift adapter once was a bit bended, which leaded exactly to the result you are describing. after carefully adjusting it and making the large plate again really straight it worked again smooth. before it was nearly impossible to shift the adapter without moving the camera a bit, now it works smooth enough if the cam is on a more or less stury tripod.
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rainer viertlböck
architecture photographer
munich / germany

www.tangential.de
lowep
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« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2014, 08:47:17 PM »
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Thanks Rainer for the useful feedback that I am happy for since it means I may be able to improve what I can do with the adapter. May I ask how did you determine yours was not straight and how did you straighten it?
« Last Edit: April 08, 2014, 08:48:52 PM by lowep » Logged
rainer_v
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« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2014, 11:08:25 PM »
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i was aware when i bended it slightly in my bag and felt how bad it was working after.
i used two little bit larger grippers to make it more plane.
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rainer viertlböck
architecture photographer
munich / germany

www.tangential.de
lowep
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« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2014, 01:55:46 PM »
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gracias :-)
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lowep
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« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2014, 09:24:17 PM »
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After washing the Zork PSA in hot soapy water than bombarding it with about half a can of bolt loosener then leaving it to dry for a day this adapter is now working and I am very happy with the results.

One good thing that I didn´t expect is the 55mm Pentax 6x7 Takumar lens I have on the front of the adapter is such a dinosaur that even a bomb going off nearby would probably not throw off the manual focus and it so big that it is easy to grasp for the delicate task of shoving the lens in whichever direction is needed to get the shots I need to stitch.

Shifting the lens changes the amount of light coming on to the sensor but this does not matter much when shooting RAW that makes it easy to adjust the virtual "exposure" of the files in post processing before stitching.

So Rainer it was me that was bent not the adapter!

So far so good  Smiley
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