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Author Topic: Landscapes - what is most important for you?  (Read 8073 times)
PhotoEcosse
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« Reply #20 on: April 21, 2014, 09:51:36 AM »
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Like you eyan, I live in northern UK (aka southern Scotland).

What has changed a bit since the days of film is the ability (or the ability to afford) to take many photographs and see immediately what you have captured without waiting for the prints to arrive back at the local chemist shop. That really does change how you arrange your photographic workflow. That, in turn, might affect how you look at the question of equipment.

My main cameras each have 36Mp sensors. Sometimes I wish they had double that - not because I need huge resolution most of the time; I rarely print larger than A3+, but because modern photo processing is data processing pure and simple. It follows, therefore, that the more data you have available, the greater your creative options can be.

It is difficult to be prescriptive but, in general landscape photography terms, I possibly average 4 hours of travel, 2 hours camera work at the location and 10 minutes processing on the PC. But that 10 minutes processing probably contributes considerably more to the finished print than the other 6 hours. (It's also the 10 minutes I dislike most!! - I am an old fashioned camera man at heart but, as I say, a lot has changed in the past 60 years.)

So, above all, have fun with your photography and be sure to join your local Camera Club - you will learn far more in the friendly atmosphere of a club than from all the internet chatrooms and books in the world.
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eyan
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« Reply #21 on: April 21, 2014, 02:43:08 PM »
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Hi guys - many thanks for all the advice, it's much appreciated, and some great points of view. I think the general consensus is that I should be good with whatever I decide on, i.e. despite the research, most decent up to date entry level cameras will do what I need for now, I think I will take a trip to a shop and give them all a go before buying to see what I feel most comfortable with, and decide that way. As I mention, I'm still new to the digital world, so I think I will be hard pressed to make a wrong choice with what's available for what I need it to do.

Once the cash is in hand, I will likely be going for one of the following - Nikon D3200 (24MP), Nikon D5100 (swivel screen), Canon 100D (small and light), or Pentax K-50 (a little more expensive due to weatherproofing, depending on how saucy I feel when it comes to buying!) - all seem to have good reviews, positive and negatives for each one, but essentially all good entry level cameras. Then allowing budget for a polariser, a good a tripod as I can afford, bag, possibly some ND filters, and lightroom. I've investigated the mirrorless scene, but feel I will be spending just as much money on kit as I would do with the above SLRs. If I really take to it, then I can start saving for lenses in the future.

I plan to do most around the Yorkshire Dales and Lake District in the UK - I'm sure I can find plenty of enthusiasts / fellow photographers to help get me going around there. I've also seen some pros in the area do workshops, which I think would be invaluable before venturing out on my own.
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Alan Klein
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« Reply #22 on: April 21, 2014, 03:26:13 PM »
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Sounds like a great plan.  Good luck.
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graeme
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« Reply #23 on: April 21, 2014, 04:01:40 PM »
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Not to complicate things more, but....

Properly implemented live view is WONDERFUL for using cameras on a tripod - you get to magnify the image 10x to check for critical focus, etc. Swivel screens are handy for those who want to put their cameras very high or very low on or off tripod.


Excellent advice.
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graeme
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« Reply #24 on: April 21, 2014, 04:03:48 PM »
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This has been alluded to in a previous post, but whatever camera and lens(es) that you get, don't forget a good support system.  A good tripod and tripod head (ballhead is preferable) will make a huge difference.  Megapixels and fancy glass don't mean squat if the image is blurry from camera movement or slight mis-focus.


More excellent advice, though there are cheaper solutions than RRS.
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NancyP
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« Reply #25 on: April 21, 2014, 05:52:44 PM »
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Don't forget the support system for the brains behind the camera: YOUR FEET. Good shoes, good socks, multiple pairs of socks if walking far. If you are comfortable, your mind will be more focused on the photography, and you will be more inclined to go the extra (literal) distance.
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #26 on: April 21, 2014, 06:33:17 PM »
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The most important things for me are:

1) Weather protection.  Most landscape pictures are really weather pictures. If you can't stay out there, you can't shoot.

2) Pixels.  Landscape pictures need to be printed large.  The more pixels the better and the better the pixels the better.

3) Lens.  The bestest, contrastiest, sharpest lens I can find.  All the better to feed those pixels.

3) Access.  If you're missing the "be there" part of "f8 and be there", it's all moot.  A van camper or an RV improves timely access dramatically.
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Lonnie Utah
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« Reply #27 on: May 15, 2014, 10:04:48 AM »
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1-If you're dead set on landscape as your field-of-interest , you don't really need autofocus. Mirrorless, via an adapter, will give you the option of a greater selection of lenses. Nikon lenses can be used on a Canon but not Canon on a Nikon - on a mirrorless you can you use either as well as many others ( Zeiss, Contax, Leica etc )  Also you won't need the f1.4 speed beasts. An f2 will be substantially more economical for no loss of quality when you're shooting at f4 - f8

There's ALOT of truth in that statement. Don't overlook what Manoli is trying to tell you.  

Don't forget the support system for the brains behind the camera: YOUR FEET. Good shoes, good socks, multiple pairs of socks if walking far. If you are comfortable, your mind will be more focused on the photography, and you will be more inclined to go the extra (literal) distance.

And this as well, which makes a lightweight mirrorless setup a benefit.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2014, 10:13:10 AM by Lonnie Utah » Logged
Colorado David
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« Reply #28 on: July 21, 2014, 12:15:32 AM »
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I wish I had all the money I spent on tripods back before I bought Gitzo.  I have a set of Gitzo tripod legs from 1984.  They are still as good today as they were then.  You can't say that about many things.  They are expensive, but they will serve you well for many years to come.  If you stay with landscape photography you will be pleased to have spent the money.  I have four Gitzo tripods in different weights for different specific uses, including a set of legs I bought from a member of this forum through the "For Sale" section.
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thurtell
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« Reply #29 on: July 26, 2014, 01:14:07 AM »
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Thanks for sharing your opinions, getting so much information.
studio photography workshop
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thurtell
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« Reply #30 on: August 09, 2014, 02:09:52 AM »
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I think one of the most important thing is the background.
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melchiorpavone
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« Reply #31 on: August 16, 2014, 08:42:43 PM »
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Hi all; first post here. I am planning on taking up landscape photography seriously this year. I live close to some beautiful areas in the north UK, and always wish I had proper gear when out and about - I do a lot of walking and hiking. I'm not a complete beginner, but it probably has been around 15 years since I used anything but a point and shoot.

So I'm planning my first DSLR purchase (last SLR I used was in the film days so lots has changed), along with tripod, ND filters etc, coming in at entry level first so I can get myself up and running. After many hours of research, it seems that nobody can give clear 'one is better than another' advice, as everyone has different opinions and brand loyalties, and most conclude after much argument that its personal preference as to which camera you end up with. Plus, the 'what camera' question has been asked a billion times.

So I thought I would ask the question in a slightly different way and hopefully get some real world opinions, as opposed to another 'what's the best camera' question - for you, what features on a DSLR are most important to you for landscape photography?

I.e., do I go Pentax k30/50 for weather sealing, Canon 100d/t5i for size and weight, Nikon d3200 for pixel count, Nikon d5100 for swivel screen and good low light performance........ The list goes on but interested to hear general thoughts, it's such a minefield out there. I don't plan to do any portraits or video etc, just landscape as this is my passion. Unfortunately budget won't stretch to a camera and new lenses just yet, so will be stuck with DSLR and kit lens for now, but lens availability for the future could play a part in my decision.

Cheers for any comments!



None of the features on a DSLR is of the slightest importance in landscape photography. Get a Leica M Typ 240 and a few Leica lenses.

http://en.leica-camera.com/Photography/Leica-M/About-the-M-System

You're thinking "features" matter. They don't. Quality alone matters. To the best of my knowledge, rocks don't move.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2014, 09:06:01 PM by melchiorpavone » Logged
Isaac
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« Reply #32 on: August 17, 2014, 12:50:40 AM »
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To the best of my knowledge, rocks don't move.

Of course they do!
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melchiorpavone
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« Reply #33 on: August 18, 2014, 09:48:40 AM »
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Of course they do!

I was not talking about avalanches, of course.
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petermfiore
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« Reply #34 on: August 18, 2014, 02:40:02 PM »
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I was not talking about avalanches, of course.

That is only but one of the many ways......

Peter
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trevorjchapman
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« Reply #35 on: August 21, 2014, 08:46:49 AM »
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Everyone has provided some great feedback but I want to add my two cents since I was in your shoes recently.  I spent so much time researching gear, reading reviews and living in forums, I had no time to go out and shoot.  Slobodan nailed it on the head....I suffered from chronic "Analysis Paralysis" and GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome).  It started with the camera, then the lenses, tripods and filters...it never ended.  Every time I bought a piece of gear I expected my images to improve...but they never did.  Once I broke out of that vicious circle and focused solely on shooting, my photos started to rapidly improve.  Don't get me wrong, good gear is important but it is like cooking a fine meal, you need pots, pans and a stove to cook but you are the chef, not the stove.

My lessons learned are as follows:
  • Buy the best lens you can afford.  Since you are into landscapes, I would look for a wide angle (10-20mm or 17-40 on full frame) and don't worry about it not being a constant f2.8.  You will rarely shoot wide open so why spend the money.  Just find a lens that is the sharpest between f8-f16.  
  • If you can afford it, look for a used full frame camera, it really does make a difference.  I bought a used 5d MkII for less then a new 70D.  But if this is still out of your range, look for the best used crop sensor but try and stay in the enthusist range sine the entry level slrs seem to exclude features like mirror lockup and back button focus options.
  • Don't be taken in by the special effects cameras have to offer (In camera HDR, filters etc), they are only applied to jpg and you will be shooting in RAW.
  • Buy the BEST tripod you can afford, nothing ruins an image faster than a wobbly tripod.
  • Buy a wired remote...you are going to be standing beside the camera anyways.
  • For filters, buy a good circular polarizer and leave it a that for now.  Learn to use it well and when not to use it.  Learn to bracket and blend in post first, this way in the field you can focus on composition.  When you are ready, only buy good filters and go with slid in systems like Lee or HiTech.
  • For software take a look at the Photographers bundle from Adobe...it is $9.99USD per month and gives you Lightroom and Photoshop.
  • Most importantly, get out and make photos, process them to the way YOU like them, and print them and hang them on your wall.  Why hide your art on your computer where no one will see them.

Happy Shooting
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melchiorpavone
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« Reply #36 on: September 02, 2014, 10:56:02 AM »
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Hi all; first post here. I am planning on taking up landscape photography seriously this year. I live close to some beautiful areas in the north UK, and always wish I had proper gear when out and about - I do a lot of walking and hiking. I'm not a complete beginner, but it probably has been around 15 years since I used anything but a point and shoot.

So I'm planning my first DSLR purchase (last SLR I used was in the film days so lots has changed), along with tripod, ND filters etc, coming in at entry level first so I can get myself up and running. After many hours of research, it seems that nobody can give clear 'one is better than another' advice, as everyone has different opinions and brand loyalties, and most conclude after much argument that its personal preference as to which camera you end up with. Plus, the 'what camera' question has been asked a billion times.

So I thought I would ask the question in a slightly different way and hopefully get some real world opinions, as opposed to another 'what's the best camera' question - for you, what features on a DSLR are most important to you for landscape photography?

I.e., do I go Pentax k30/50 for weather sealing, Canon 100d/t5i for size and weight, Nikon d3200 for pixel count, Nikon d5100 for swivel screen and good low light performance........ The list goes on but interested to hear general thoughts, it's such a minefield out there. I don't plan to do any portraits or video etc, just landscape as this is my passion. Unfortunately budget won't stretch to a camera and new lenses just yet, so will be stuck with DSLR and kit lens for now, but lens availability for the future could play a part in my decision.

Cheers for any comments!



You'll need an Ansel Adams tripod-hole locator. Be sure to place the legs of your tripod in the very same holes that were made by AA. That way your photos will take on the qualities that made his "great".
« Last Edit: September 02, 2014, 11:53:26 AM by melchiorpavone » Logged
Isaac
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« Reply #37 on: September 02, 2014, 11:28:23 AM »
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Is that the best you have to offer?
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melchiorpavone
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« Reply #38 on: September 02, 2014, 12:16:14 PM »
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Is that the best you have to offer?

It's a joke, son...
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Isaac
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« Reply #39 on: September 02, 2014, 04:17:40 PM »
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It's not been funny for a long long time, grandad…
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