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Author Topic: Shooting mode  (Read 1058 times)
ANINDYA MOOKERJEE
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« on: May 04, 2014, 07:03:25 AM »
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For a beginner in wildlife photography, which is more appropriate- shutter priority or aperture priority? and why?
Please advice.

N.B- I have some experience with landscape but none whatsoever with wildlife.
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Woody Hill
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« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2014, 02:59:52 PM »
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I am not a pro, but have done a fair amount of wildlife photography.  I use aperture priority 100% of the time, wide open for whatever lens I am using. I adjust the ISO up to insure a motion stopping shutter speed - any where fron 100 to 6400 for the ISO and 1/200 to 1/1000 for the shutter depending on the lens, lighting and situation. If the focus point is the critter's eye  there is no need to worry about  depth of field. I also shoot in bursts just in case of  unexpected movement. Not many things I enjoy doing more. I hope you find it as much fun as I do.
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BobShaw
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« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2014, 06:54:40 AM »
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When things are happening quickly then you may need to use automatic modes like Av and Tv, but the best advise I can give any amateur is to learn how to shoot in Manual Mode. Every other mode is automatic to some extent.

If you use Av or Tv then your exposure is being worked out by a mathematical formula devised by some technician in Japan based on an average light reading of some sort that may have no bearing on the correct exposure for your subject. Then you have to worry about varying amounts of exposure compensation, which is just correcting for getting it wrong in the first place. That is because the brightness of the subject will be incorrectly affecting the exposure, even if the ambient light is not changing.

Once you get the hang of Manual then it soon becomes instinctive and works in very situation from wildlife to studio. Depending on whether you are Canon or Nikon or how you set it up your thumb is always aperture and your forefinger is always shutter speed. Three clicks of either wheel is one stop. Conversely, if you change between Av and Tv then you are always having to think about controls what.
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ANINDYA MOOKERJEE
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« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2014, 08:16:16 AM »
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Thanks a lot to both of you for your advice.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2014, 08:18:49 AM by ANINDYA MOOKERJEE » Logged
jannatul18
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« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2014, 04:05:54 AM »
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As far as I know aperture priority 100% is the better choice.
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