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Author Topic: LCD Monitor lifespan?  (Read 855 times)
abeofRD
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« on: May 21, 2014, 09:03:57 AM »
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Hello,

I currently have a NEC 3090WQXi 30" screen with Spectra view/i1 system purchased in April of 2010, what is the current life span of this monitors? When do I need to replace them if ever? Do they degrade overtime as CRT Monitors?


Thank you all
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Jim Kasson
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« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2014, 10:09:43 AM »
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I currently have a NEC 3090WQXi 30" screen with Spectra view/i1 system purchased in April of 2010, what is the current life span of this monitors? When do I need to replace them if ever? Do they degrade overtime as CRT Monitors?

[simplification mode on] The principle source of CRT color degradation was the phosphors that converted the energy in the electron beam to light. The backlight of a fluorescent-lit LCD display is a set of tubes containing phosphors. The output light of those phosphors can be expected to change over time.    The backlight of a LED-lit LCD display is a set of LEDs that use phosphors to convert blue to white light. The output light of those phosphors can be expected to change over time. In addition, the dyes in the LCD panel can be expected to change their characteristics over time. [simplification mode off]  

It's possible to construct LCD backlights using red, green, and blue LEDs. There would be no phospor to degrade in that case, although LED output levels degrade over time.

All that being said, I've not seen a LCD panel degrade to the point where it couldn't be calibrated correctly, as used to happen with CRTs.

Jim
« Last Edit: May 21, 2014, 10:13:38 AM by Jim Kasson » Logged

digitaldog
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« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2014, 11:04:19 AM »
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I'd imagine that at such a point you can't hit the cd/m2 you wish, it's a sign the unit is going south. That was the case with CRT's. Of course you can lower that value until it's so dim, time to get a new unit.
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Andrew Rodney
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fsangre
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« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2014, 06:36:42 AM »
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As you can check in the "Please help, "Shadows" on my NEC Spectraview 2490 and 2490WUXi2, Mura effect?" thread in that same section of the forum, I just have suffering a bad experience with two NEC displays.

In my case, the professional working life of those was just over 10.000 hrs, even less if I were more exigent when the first signs of problems appeared after a year-year and a half after purchase.
What has limited their life is not the natural fade of brightness of backlightning, which remains correct and, but issues affecting LCD technology as a whole and defects in the quality-fabrication of my displays.

What I expected when I bought the NECs was over 30.000 hrs in order to amortize my investment, a reasonable figure for a supposedly professional product, but not even close to the actual performance. From that experience I only can to wish better luck to you and the advice to use your warranty rights quickly if you begin to have any problem (tolerate them focused in my work was my error, a hard lesson)

Besides, I have to mention that in my professional life including the "digital revolution" from the beginning, that type of short life in a pro display was very uncommon to me (it was a bad surprise), and I presently possess CRTs from BARCO or even Supermatch Pressview Trinitron with more than 20 yrs working fine (that is limited to serve high end scanners but bright and calibratable enough to serve their duty), making the investment done at that time one of the best of all equipment.
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