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Author Topic: Encoding Seems Very Slow  (Read 2599 times)
Kevin Gallagher
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« on: June 07, 2014, 12:08:47 PM »
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  Hi guys, I've been playing around with some video stuff and I'm noticing that it seems to take an awful long time for a video file (MP4, MKV,Etc.) to be encoded so it can be put on a DVD (Using Toast 11). My iMac is a couple of years old, no ssd's but it's 2.8 ghz I7 with 16 gb of ram. The origin and destination of the encoded files are the iMac's C drive. Is this normal? Now it looks like to encode a 1.5 GB file will take the best part of 24 hrs..yikes!!

Kevin in CT
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Chris Sanderson
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« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2014, 01:04:44 PM »
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That sounds as if you have a setting wrong somewhere. Likely there is some very complicated math required to get from the original to the encode.

Use the KISS principle.

Unless you absolutely need to have these otherwise, make sure that the frame rate matches the original, the size is a very simple fraction of the original (e.g. 50%) and that you are not encoding from an original that is long GoP - beter in that case to ouput a full-rez, full-frame 'master' (e.g. ProRes 422)and then make your encodes from that. If your original is interlaced, either stay with it or drop one field entirely; interpolation of the two fields is computationally heavy.
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Christopher Sanderson
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« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2014, 08:04:43 PM »
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  Hi guys, I've been playing around with some video stuff and I'm noticing that it seems to take an awful long time for a video file (MP4, MKV,Etc.) to be encoded so it can be put on a DVD (Using Toast 11). My iMac is a couple of years old, no ssd's but it's 2.8 ghz I7 with 16 gb of ram. The origin and destination of the encoded files are the iMac's C drive. Is this normal? Now it looks like to encode a 1.5 GB file will take the best part of 24 hrs..yikes!!

Kevin in CT

You didn't mention how long the video is, are you producing dvd chapters?, what edl you used for editing, what your editing source material codec is, what your output codec was.

With the 64 NLE's  like fcp eX, or Premier, just because you can drop every type of file in it and edit doesn't mean that somewhere down line you have to end up with one cohesive clip.

Personally unless your running avid, we put everything into pro res 422 10 bit before we start the editorial process and then decide how to set up the NLE either using the full source, or working as proxy.

At least prores allows for less rending on the machine when you go to output, unless your running effects or a tone of filters and transitions.

I haven't been requested to burn playable dvd's in a long time, but read the toast manual or find a forum that deals with toast and they'll know from trial and error the best source codec to work from.

It probably with be mpg2 at 720.

IMO

BC
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Kevin Gallagher
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« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2014, 06:41:57 AM »
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  Thanks guys, so far I've just been using whatever the default of Toast is IOW, I'm right clicking on the file and selecting "Toast It".  The vids are generally about 60 minutes long or so and I'm not trying to do chapters. From what you said BC it looks like I've got a lot of basic understanding to get caught up on!!  Smiley

FWIW, it seems that the file size to be burned to the DVD is about twice the original file size.
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Kevin Gallagher
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« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2014, 08:56:29 AM »
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 Got it squared away now guys. I ended up using an Iskysoft program to convert the file to the VOB format (It took about 90 minutes) and it's now being burned to DVD with Toast. Thanks to you both!!


Kevin in CT
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