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Author Topic: Da Vinci Resolve 11 Lite  (Read 7375 times)
Pete_G
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« on: June 26, 2014, 12:50:44 PM »
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Seems like Resolve 11 Lite is now available as a beta version. Lots of enhancements to the editing side of the software,
for those who just need basic editing features, i.e. short form films and, of course, colour grading - this might be the only app you need. I haven't tried it yet but I'd be surprised if it wasn't stable, knowing BM's track record, and the fact that Resolve 11 (paid version) has been around for some months now.
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bcooter
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« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2014, 02:47:04 PM »
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Seems like Resolve 11 Lite is now available as a beta version. Lots of enhancements to the editing side of the software,
for those who just need basic editing features, i.e. short form films and, of course, colour grading - this might be the only app you need. I haven't tried it yet but I'd be surprised if it wasn't stable, knowing BM's track record, and the fact that Resolve 11 (paid version) has been around for some months now.

I have a feeling that Blackmagic is going to evolve resolve into a full editorial suite, which would be a good idea, considering the void left from fcp 7.

I use resolve 9 regularly and for roundtripping and coloring with some basic effects it's very good, especially with RED footage and briefly tested 11, though as you mention 11 is fine for quick cuts, with simple transitions but not really a full fledged editorial suite.

I think we'll eventually see a suite (from someone) that editing, coloration and even some effects are done on the same timeline.  Coloring on the timeline is priceless as it let's you match and tweak to impact the story and no matter how qualified a colorist you are, I've never done a video where I don't do some final adjustment on the timeline.

But resolve as a coloration tool is wonderful, especially for the cost.

IMO

BC
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Gandalf
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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2014, 04:55:48 PM »
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11.1 is now out and it just keeps getting better. I'm giving it a real look. Right now the features that it is lacking I can mostly work around, though one shoot is heavily multi cam, so that's out.
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bcooter
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2014, 04:10:39 PM »
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11.1 is now out and it just keeps getting better. I'm giving it a real look. Right now the features that it is lacking I can mostly work around, though one shoot is heavily multi cam, so that's out.

I just did 1 hour 46 minutes of rushes using resolve and it's editing funcitons.   Running a full tilt mac silver desktop and a RED rocket card for the RED footage it worked ok, but for editing, it's pretty rough and loads up quickly.

(1/2 my footage was RED, 1/2 70d) all in their native codecs.

What I found was you need fast scratch disks, fast graphic cards and open cl and btw: save the project every few seconds as you will get a crash with mixed footage.

The results though are good because resolve has nice footage rendering.

I also suggest buying film convert for resolve as it gives a much nicer look to the files, especailly dslr files, though film convert is somewhat buggy to load properly.

Actually, though I never edit fully in fcpX, since I was mixing 4k and 2k footage It would have been a lot faster for simple rushes type edit to use fcpx set for proxy media, then export a fcpXxml to resolve and then round trip back.

I hope blackmagic makes a good editorial program, but today, it requires too many workarounds to do anything complex.

BTW:  I would never consider color grading in fcpX at least not for finish as it's rendering, look and system is way time consuming compared to Resolve 11.1.

IMO

BC
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Gandalf
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« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2014, 12:13:42 PM »
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Thanks BC, that's great info.
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bcooter
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« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2014, 04:24:03 PM »
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Thanks BC, that's great info.

Resolve is excellent but unless I'm missing something, it is missing some simple functions, like eye dropper wb, better keying, easier key frames, etc.

FilmConvert is worth the price, just for the wb slider alone, though you must read the instructions for installing and install the correct packets for your camera.

Just a note.

One thing I noticed on the rushes, which were 4k red and 2k 70d.  When I went to render a single clip in flat pass, the rendering meter said 56 hours.  I restarted to clear the video ram but got the same result, so set two more scratch disks and open cl and the rendering went to 2 hours 46 minutes.

Could have just been a glitch on my system, but 56 to 2 hours is a big deal.

IMO

BC
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Gandalf
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« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2014, 08:25:46 PM »
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Resolve is excellent but unless I'm missing something, it is missing some simple functions, like eye dropper wb, better keying, easier key frames, etc.

Honestly, I'm too new at this to comment intelligently. It does have a setting tab in the color tools to work with a colorchecker card, but I don't see eye dropper wb. The eye droppers seem to be more for selecting specific colors. One person I work with is neck deep in Adobe and another uses either FCPX or Media Composer, so my hope is that Resolve can be a little more for me than just color, but I don't know.

Quote
FilmConvert is worth the price, just for the wb slider alone, though you must read the instructions for installing and install the correct packets for your camera.

Thanks, I will look into it.

Quote
One thing I noticed on the rushes, which were 4k red and 2k 70d.  When I went to render a single clip in flat pass, the rendering meter said 56 hours.  I restarted to clear the video ram but got the same result, so set two more scratch disks and open cl and the rendering went to 2 hours 46 minutes.

Could have just been a glitch on my system, but 56 to 2 hours is a big deal.

Good tip on the scratch drive. Right now I am working remotely with just a laptop and chalked up the slow speed to that. How much scratch drive space does it need?
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Chrisso26
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« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2014, 09:33:50 PM »
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White balance in Resolve 11 depends on whether you are shooting ProRes or raw.
I'm always shooting raw.
So I just select my camera type (Blackmagic) in the camera setting and my footage generally comes up fairly well balanced.
There is a download to help with ProRes white balance made by a guy called Captain Hook.
http://www.captainhook.co.nz/blackmagic-cinema-camera-lut/

For quick grading, I find dropping one of his LUTs on to my clip get's me very close to where I need to be, very quickly.
Resolve is very different to photography applications. It's very complex and a steep learning curve.
I've just started the Ripple Training Resolve 11 course.
You can do everything you need to do in Resolve 11, you just need to understand how to do it. I must admit I find Capture One a lot easier.
I bought Film Convert and didn't like the results. Yeah it's very easy to use and very quick, but it just softens your footage and adds fake film artefacts, in my humble opinion.
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Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2014, 04:37:22 AM »
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I did a vid on grey balance in resolve.. https://vimeo.com/72582560
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kjkahn
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« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2014, 11:55:52 AM »
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It sounds like some of you have missed the new Color Match feature.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byTporDXYxA
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Zerui
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« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2014, 04:57:35 AM »
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I am climbing the learning curve in digital filmmaking.
So far I concentrated on short (15min) nature cinÚcollages
(combining video clips with Ken Barnes stills, and the four kinds of sound).
Examples on VimeoPro.com/goff/Alps.

I have pretty well mastered Final Cut Pro X, including its fiddly colour correction tool.
Now I am ready to embark on round tripping to Resolve, which will I hope enable me to correct and grade video clips to the same image quality as still images imported to the film after they have been processed in Phocus.
(Still and video need to work together well in cinÚcollages).

My question concerns the choice of computer for processing short cinÚcollages.
FCPX works well enough on my MacBook Pro.  But Resolve 11.1 light stutters.
So I conclude that I need to buy a more powerful Mac that will do FCP and Resolve comfortably.
Apple are pushing their MacPro for FCPX & Resolve.
But would the new 27 inch iMac do the job?
Apple rumours carry a story that suggests the IMac is "as powerful" as the low end MacPro.
But would that be the case for FCPX and Resolve?

I would appreciate your advice,

Goff

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Pete_G
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« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2014, 06:58:27 AM »
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http://software.blackmagicdesign.com/DaVinciResolve/docs/DaVinci_Resolve_Mac_Config_Guide_June_2014.pdf

CPU speed and GPU speed and memory size are what counts.
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Zerui
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« Reply #12 on: October 23, 2014, 01:16:45 PM »
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Thank you, Peter, for drawing my attention to the  Blackmagic note.   As I plan to explore 4K next year,  I guess I shall have to fork out for a Mac Pro.  Goff
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neways
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« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2014, 10:06:22 AM »
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I just start to shoot Magic Lantern raw video on Canon 5D MarkIII. For the post work, I just wonder what is the main difference between color grading the footage in Photoshop Camera Raw then import the sequenced jpeg or tiff clips to FCP X verse do that part in Resolve 11 Lite?
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Chris L
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« Reply #14 on: November 03, 2014, 03:03:23 PM »
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It sounds like some of you have missed the new Color Match feature.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byTporDXYxA

Thanks for this, I did not know it was there. But this tool illustrates my frustration with Resolve; there area lot of steps in there to get to what C1 Pro and others can do with one simple click of the greydropper tool on the 18% grey square. I think the video editing softwares need to look at how easy the still editing software is.
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bcooter
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« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2014, 03:27:09 PM »
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Thanks for this, I did not know it was there. But this tool illustrates my frustration with Resolve; there area lot of steps in there to get to what C1 Pro and others can do with one simple click of the greydropper tool on the 18% grey square. I think the video editing softwares need to look at how easy the still editing software is.

Word.

I've used the color checker, but it's a cludge of a workaround, where a dropper, slider will do it.

It makes you go to a separate function to base out the wb and if your using mixed light and have some intentional bleed you get mixed results.

Honestly, get film convert or some other plug in that allows you to use two sliders, one for wb, one for exposure and be done with the base cc, or somebody at Adobe ask for lightroom do do motion tracking and  video.

IMO

BC
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Chrisso26
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« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2014, 04:58:10 PM »
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Film Convert only works for ProRes, not Raw.
I've found ProRes (exposure and white balance) very difficult to nail on the BM cameras, so therefore shooting exclusively raw.
Film Convert is also a film stock emulation, not really a grading app.
I recently tried the colour checker feature and found it pretty much a two click operation (with raw). Click to match the colour chart on your footage, then click to adjust exposure to taste. results were excellent, using a variety of different lenses.
The real hassle comes when having to shoot colour charts for every lighting scenario when out and about filming.
As a C1 user I've been requesting Phase One make processing of motion video easier for a couple of years now. You can get amazing results very quickly if you are prepared to process thousands of TIFFs for a one minute video sequence, then reimport them to an NLE. A Capture One motion version would be the ultimate (with tracking of course).
« Last Edit: November 03, 2014, 05:23:16 PM by Chrisso26 » Logged
eronald
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« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2014, 08:56:00 PM »
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I just got a Panasonic GH4, for very short interviews and documentaries, and am starting to find my feet - expect it will take 6 months at least.
First glance at my footage, white balance is the only real issue. Any advice?
I'm thinking of adopting Resolve Lite in due course, because it's free.

Paradoxically, after my first tests, sound worries me more; I cannot figure out how to do clean sound on camera, and think I will go with Sennheiser HF and lav.

Edmund
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Zerui
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« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2014, 02:41:44 AM »
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Edmund.  I have used a R°de Lav mic with great success, plugging it into the stereo input socket of my Leica M240.  Not only does it produce voice cleanly, but it also captures the ambient sounds well (i.e. Foley sound).
For example a recording in the garden captures bird song in the background on a voice over.
You can see the results in Vimeo.com/goff. The short film of making a calendar of butterflies in the Alps is topped and tailed with voice over in the garden at home. I have a number of R°de mics. They all perform very well.  Excellent value for money.  Goff
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bcooter
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« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2014, 08:38:40 AM »
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First get a small Cage from Wooden Camera.   It is the most adaptable and won't add much bulk to your system, though allows you to add a few things when needed, especially a top handle for dutch angles.

Second buy good nd faders to use as your f stop.   Tiffen test out well. 

If your using the 2.8 zooms remember in reality at wide open your at 5.6, so for subject isolation try to step back when you can and add a few more feet in focal length (but that's an artistic decision).

For sound the GH4 has lousy shielding and pre amps, so you can live with it, or buy a tascam that you run from mic to tascam to camera.  That will help dramatically and the tascams are cheap.

For mics I've got em all and the radio Senihauser Lavs I find are the best, also their microphones.    They make a small mic that is fairly fragile but mounts on camera and is good for foley.

For one person interviews use a radio lav and get some pads that go between the body and the mic.   This cuts down on rubbing and clothes crunching noises (you can find them on google).

For multi person interviews either add another lav, or if the subject(s) are stationary and you don't have a boom operator mount an adjustable directional mic (with windscreen) on a stand and point it out of camera frame to the subjects.   It works very well.

I have Rode, don't like most of their mics and most people go with Seinhauser.  That's your call.

I would get battery powered rather than phantom powered mics, if you can.

Remember you can fix an image (sometimes) but rarely ever fix bad sound.

For WB never set it on auto when filming as it will change as conditions change.   You will need to do some testing for coloration and tone out of camera as the gh4 does not have an S-log or a technicolor log.

Try to get somewhat flat and hold the highlights as much as possible, manually adjust the color temp.  Keep reference files so you footage will match as close as possible.

Adjust your screen (at least the brightness to more match your computer so your not surprised when you shoot).

You can move the color settings around in the menu and you'll probably won't to remove as much yellow and red as possible as panasonic sets their file to that bias.

Unless your working to a separate hdmi recorder, the file is 8 bit so it's somewhat fragile (though the best of the h264 cameras I've used).   Do some tests where you set your file to the camera's lcd or viewfinder then put it in the computer and see how it holds the highlights.  Usually whatever you set in camera, you then stop down 1/3, but that's very user dependent.  If you stop down too far your going to get a lot of noise.

You'll probably work 4k because most people believe bigger is better, (sometimes it is), but the bps on 2k is heafty and I'd shoot 2k, only go to 4k if their is the possibllity of alaising or moire.

But that's a judgement call.


BC

I just got a Panasonic GH4, for very short interviews and documentaries, and am starting to find my feet - expect it will take 6 months at least.
First glance at my footage, white balance is the only real issue. Any advice?
I'm thinking of adopting Resolve Lite in due course, because it's free.

Paradoxically, after my first tests, sound worries me more; I cannot figure out how to do clean sound on camera, and think I will go with Sennheiser HF and lav.

Edmund
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