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Author Topic: The latest from Colorado  (Read 688 times)
rgs
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« on: July 27, 2014, 05:58:21 PM »
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I have just returned from a visit to my daughter and her family in Colorado. Here are a few from the trip. Enjoy. Comments gratefully received.
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Paulo Bizarro
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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2014, 02:46:19 AM »
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Seems like a great place to hike and photograph, I can only be envious. My favourites are #'s 1 and 2: a good general view with added mystery from the fog; and an intimate study of texture on the bark/tree.

#3 for me does not work, the light is poor and washed out in the sky.
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Walt Roycraft
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« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2014, 05:35:40 AM »
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Seems like a great place to hike and photograph, I can only be envious. My favourites are #'s 1 and 2: a good general view with added mystery from the fog; and an intimate study of texture on the bark/tree.

#3 for me does not work, the light is poor and washed out in the sky.

Agree'd
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maddogmurph
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« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2014, 05:15:14 PM »
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Seems like a great place to hike and photograph, I can only be envious. My favourites are #'s 1 and 2: a good general view with added mystery from the fog; and an intimate study of texture on the bark/tree.

#3 for me does not work, the light is poor and washed out in the sky.

Interesting I was going to say 1,2 & 4 aren't doing much for me, and 3 would look good as an HDR.  I'm not a huge fan of HDR.  But the only way to capture what you were after *which I might add was a good eye (The beautiful twisting bark of this tree) would be to have an over exposed sky.  You can't use a grad filter because of the shape and position of the tree.  The only solution is to combine 2 or more images one with the sky in proper focus, and the other with the tree, then combine them in post production.
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Maddog - Apologetically critical

Calumet // Tachihara // Schneider 90mm, 210mm // 10" // FUJIFILM X-T1 // 10-24mm, 18-55mm, F55-200mm, 35mm, 60mm // Driod POS // Pentax WG3 // Sony RX100 // Nikon D810 // 24mm 1.4, 50mm 1.4

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rgs
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« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2014, 06:02:40 PM »
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Interesting I was going to say 1,2 & 4 aren't doing much for me, and 3 would look good as an HDR.  I'm not a huge fan of HDR.  But the only way to capture what you were after *which I might add was a good eye (The beautiful twisting bark of this tree) would be to have an over exposed sky.  You can't use a grad filter because of the shape and position of the tree.  The only solution is to combine 2 or more images one with the sky in proper focus, and the other with the tree, then combine them in post production.

I agree about #3. It's a mid afternoon shot at about 12,000 feet, a bristle-cone forest on Mt. Evans just below the tree line. I was with my family so moving faster than usual. That midday mountain light can be quite harsh (and blue). Most of the time I would either blend exposures using Exposure Fusion (not HDR) and/or shoot earlier or later in the day. I'm not sure I'm going to get much more out of that one. #2 was made at the same time (it's the same tree up close) but, without the sky, is, I think, much better. I also like the little knot in the center right of #2. If I had seen it while I was there, I would have made a macro of it. As it is, I'm afraid the file would not survive that severe of a crop.
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maddogmurph
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« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2014, 06:10:10 PM »
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That area is beautiful isn't it.  I agree with you on the knob.  The bristle cones are a difficult photograph for me.  I have shot these trees, and can never capture the feeling.  If I could pump the spirit of a 4000 year old tree into my photograph I'm sure it would look amazing, but somehow that spirit seems to escape every time I click the button.  Case in point - from the Pentax WG-3 on the Pacific Crest Trial.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2014, 06:14:04 PM by maddogmurph » Logged

Maddog - Apologetically critical

Calumet // Tachihara // Schneider 90mm, 210mm // 10" // FUJIFILM X-T1 // 10-24mm, 18-55mm, F55-200mm, 35mm, 60mm // Driod POS // Pentax WG3 // Sony RX100 // Nikon D810 // 24mm 1.4, 50mm 1.4

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Isaac
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« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2014, 07:02:18 PM »
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blend exposures using Exposure Fusion (not HDR) I'm not sure I'm going to get much more out of that one.

Well, you could take the exposure you have and push it in different directions and then put it back together:

- for the sky - reduce exposure, recover highlights, compress highlights, etc

- for the land - whatever

:and then put the differently processed files back together using exposure fusion (as-if they were separate exposures) or mask and layer.
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Dave Pluimer
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« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2014, 09:49:24 AM »
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I think #3 has a lot of B&W potential.
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