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Author Topic: Movie film gets life support  (Read 1059 times)
eronald
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« on: July 31, 2014, 03:57:10 AM »
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Wanna bet they pull the plug within 5 years?
http://online.wsj.com/articles/kodak-movie-film-at-deaths-door-gets-a-reprieve-1406674752?tesla=y

Edmund
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David Anderson
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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2014, 04:34:37 AM »
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That's great, but if people don't stop stealing content and the big internet players don't stop helping them, the movie industry will fade to virtually nothing soon.
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eronald
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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2014, 04:59:22 AM »
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That's great, but if people don't stop stealing content and the big internet players don't stop helping them, the movie industry will fade to virtually nothing soon.
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Stealing content? I was a tech journalist for years - but print has faded to almost the same degree as film.

What killed it wasn't that people stole print or web content, it is that the magazines and web sites lost control of the monetization which was taken over by the likes of Google, who just keep the advertising money. The guys who are into content don't understand the financials, and the content is not getting stolen, it is getting sold, but the money is flowing into the pockets of those who understand the system.

Google figured out before anyone else that there is no point in rewarding content creators because content is like prairie vegetation - it always grows back for free. You just need to make sure it grows on your turf.

A lot of people are making good money from content these days - Google, the Huffington Post, this site, and they don't steal the content - they get most of it for free. People who generate content will starve; people who organize and distribute content will benefit. In the end content is now like air, necessary but free, and people are mostly willing to pay for the piping but not for the stuff itself.

Of course there are exceptions. There's still money for the people at the very top of news writing. And for top authors. But the iceberg is melting more and more every year.

And you know, content is not just newswriting or images. Super-skilled jobs like college maths professors are going to be seeing the same phenomenon - your average uni can now pipe in its calculus or algebra course from MIT or India; they may still need a few TAs, but I guess indian grad students over in Delhi can use Skype. In fact they probably wrote the Skype code. So why should  a small university go to the trouble of having a maths department if they don't need the professors and don't do world-leading research? And then why should the students enroll if everything is just piped in?

Edmund
« Last Edit: July 31, 2014, 06:52:25 AM by eronald » Logged
Chris Livsey
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« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2014, 05:08:13 AM »
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It's scale. Ilford (Harmann technology) don't produce movie film. They have one, versatile, it coats paper as well, coating machine. Minimal, loyal, highly trained staff and a niche market. they don't look like pulling the plug. Adapt or die.
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Ken R
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« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2014, 07:13:50 AM »
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I for one really enjoy watching films projected on the big screen with a traditional film projector. Digital projection / screen quality varies quite a bit from place to place and on a lot of the local theatres that have HD projectors I can see lines in the image. It really detracts from the experience. My wife even mentioned it first without me saying anything and she does not know anything about photography or image quality etc.

I have seen 4K projection and some movies look just amazing on them, specially those that have amazing wide shots with lots of detail, and really enhances the experience of watching them but in others I can't get past the technology.

Business wide I guess that digital projection and the DCP standard makes a lot more sense but It would be cool to have the option of seeing film projection.
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Chris_Brown
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« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2014, 09:01:06 AM »
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The few film-lovers who want this have quite a romance with film and its inherent qualities. Good for them. But most theaters project digitally now.

Cinematic, high quality, digital capture of motion is, what, ten years old? In another ten the qualities of this tech will be superior to any film capture and its post-production requirements.

Regarding projection, I went to a film festival here in town a couple years ago. Before one of the films, the theater owner was touting the aesthetic qualities of film projection and criticizing the cost & features of digital projection. Halfway through the movie, the film derailed off the projector's pulley sprockets. The movie was stopped while the projectionist re-mounted the film, completely destroying the experience of the movie & story. For me, that closed the case on the superior aesthetics of film.

In my experience, digital projection has a better, more accurate & controllable color gamut. There's no gate flutter. No reel cues. No scratching.

But I still prefer to watch a movie at home. I only go to the theater if the rest of my family wants to make a date of it.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2014, 09:15:40 AM »
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In my experience, digital projection has a better, more accurate & controllable color gamut. There's no gate flutter. No reel cues. No scratching.
Totally agree! The scratching alone is a huge problem. I rarely go to the theaters, prefer to do this at home. But the experience is better today thanks to digital. The image quality is prefect on day one and day 300.
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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2014, 09:19:30 AM »
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Wanna bet they pull the plug within 5 years?
We're talking Kodak, a company with amazing technical abilities and just awful business abilities. And Mr. Clarke said that he expects Kodak will lose money on film manufacturing in 2014 and roughly break even by next year, based on the deals currently being worked out. Right, let's see how well Mr. Clarke's predictions pan out. If history is any indication, it will be way off.
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Andrew Rodney
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David Anderson
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« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2014, 07:37:33 PM »
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 Super-skilled jobs like college maths professors are going to be seeing the same phenomenon - your average uni can now pipe in its calculus or algebra course from MIT or India; they may still need a few TAs, but I guess indian grad students over in Delhi can use Skype.

I don't think anyone is going to miss their college maths professor... Grin
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