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Author Topic: Sunrise over Aigüestortes  (Read 891 times)
MGH
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« on: August 04, 2014, 06:55:31 AM »
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I took this on a recent trip to the Pyrenees.
Thanks for looking, C&C welcome.

Mark.


Aigüestortes by marcodemalaga, on Flickr
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2014, 08:53:33 AM »
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Nicely composed and well processed.

About that frame: using a light frame with a subject with lots of shadow details makes them darker and dimmer.
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Slobodan

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francois
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« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2014, 09:30:14 AM »
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Very nice image with great colors and reflection. I especially like how the left of the frame breaks the symmetry.
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Francois
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« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2014, 12:01:16 PM »
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Sublimely peaceful view
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luxborealis
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« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2014, 12:47:59 PM »
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I agree, the photo is beautiful and well-executed in every sense.


About that frame: using a light frame with a subject with lots of shadow details makes them darker and dimmer.

Not sure where you're coming from on this, Slobodan. It is still typical to frame all art with a white mat around it (although there is a minority who disagree and use black or grey and some kitsch tastes feel mats can be in a variety of earthy, pastel and other colours). If the colours or shadow details appear dimmer, it could be that the OP's LR Develop module or PS ACR background is something other than white (e.g. light or dark grey), thus causing a barely perceptual shift to slightly dimmer tones/exposure overall without realizing it, until, of course, it's surrounded by white.
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Terry McDonald
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Rajan Parrikar
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« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2014, 01:19:38 PM »
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Beautiful light.  I hope you took more than one composition.
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2014, 01:20:57 PM »
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... Not sure where you're coming from on this, Slobodan. It is still typical to frame all art with a white mat around it...

True, however... when printing for matting, one then takes that into account (via white background in LR, for instance, as you rightly pointed out) and makes the whole print a ted lighter.

However, we are here presented with an online rendering on a transmissive screen, and, if clicked, we are then taken to Flickr's pure black background, where the white border clashes with it. A file rendered on a black screen simply glows, opens its shadows and details, appears more saturated.
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Lonnie Utah
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« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2014, 01:43:59 PM »
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I am of the fairly strong opinion(s) that:

1). Landscape photos when framed should ALWAYS be surrounded by a black mat.  I realize that I am in the minority with that opinion, and I'm ok with that.

2). I have never been partial of photographs with an artificial digital frame around them. IMHO, it's simply a waste of pixels.

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maddogmurph
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« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2014, 02:50:23 PM »
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Things I would have thought about include moving to the right to gain perfect symmetry if possible.  Crop to the peaks and reflection.  Lower to the water slightly.  All said and done it's shot perfectly.  I like the way the foreground is balanced by the darkening of the water particularly.  And the fact that you haven't pushed anything to look over saturated or emphasized.
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luxborealis
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« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2014, 04:27:08 PM »
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True, however... when printing for matting, one then takes that into account (via white background in LR, for instance, as you rightly pointed out) and makes the whole print a ted lighter.

However, we are here presented with an online rendering on a transmissive screen, and, if clicked, we are then taken to Flickr's pure black background, where the white border clashes with it. A file rendered on a black screen simply glows, opens its shadows and details, appears more saturated.

I agree - on Flickr it suffers.

Lonnie - Not a waste of pixels if it creates better conditions for viewing, which is why in my case, anyway, I set all my photos for the web with a background I can control - a white square which gives separation from whatever background is used on the webpage. Perhaps Rajan does this for the same reason.
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Terry McDonald
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Lonnie Utah
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« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2014, 09:48:28 PM »
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Lonnie - Not a waste of pixels if it creates better conditions for viewing, which is why in my case, anyway, I set all my photos for the web with a background I can control - a white square which gives separation from whatever background is used on the webpage. Perhaps Rajan does this for the same reason.

In a photograph, your eyes are naturally attracted to the lightest part of the image. If this happens to be a white mat or border, then that's what your eyes are attracted to (and not the image itself). That's why I say ALWAYS black for mats (and borders if you choose). It's not just aesthetics, it's psychology.
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Paulo Bizarro
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« Reply #11 on: August 05, 2014, 03:19:02 AM »
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Wonderful light and reflection.
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luxborealis
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« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2014, 12:36:20 PM »
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In a photograph, your eyes are naturally attracted to the lightest part of the image. If this happens to be a white mat or border, then that's what your eyes are attracted to (and not the image itself). That's why I say ALWAYS black for mats (and borders if you choose). It's not just aesthetics, it's psychology.

True, the photographs certainly "pop" more but, psychology has many twists... as soon as you put glass over a black mat, guess what it becomes - a mirror. Guess what people will then be more interested in - your right, themselves. Not everyone, but a surprising number.

I never realized this until a gallery owner pointed it out to me by suggesting I just sit and watch for bit to see what happens in front of the black matted photographs. Funny, eh?!

There is also a difference in the feeling of space between white and black. Black gives the feeling of looking in through a window or door or viewfinder (or peepshow) causing the viewer to feel enclosed, a feeling you don't tend to get with white. But perhaps this is best left to another thread...
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Terry McDonald
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MGH
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« Reply #13 on: August 07, 2014, 02:32:08 PM »
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Thanks everyone for your comments, I´m glad you like the image if not the frame.  I like to present my images with a frame and to me a light color works best for the majority of my photos, also it separates the photos a little on Flickrs main page.

Mark.
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