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Author Topic: UPS Battery Backup for Large Format Printers?  (Read 762 times)
Concord
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« on: August 20, 2014, 06:37:02 PM »
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We have spotty power here and a backup generator that kicks in automatically, however there is a slight delay between the power going out and the generator kicking in.

I was thinking of getting a UPS for the printer.  Will it be compatible with the IPF8400?  I read that the UPS uses a simulated sine wave... not sure if that's ok for he printer.  What should I look for in a UPS in terms of power?  I will not be operating the printer when the power's out, however it might go through a maintenance cycle.
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jrsforums
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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2014, 08:32:22 PM »
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Your backup generator probable does not product a "pure" sine wave.  I doubt you would have a problem with to good UPS.

JOHN

...but, my training is in Chemical engineering. :-)
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John
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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2014, 08:42:38 PM »
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I would definitely run a UPS battery backup and surge protector with all your equipment.  If you have spotty power, the UPS will protect against brown outs which I think are potentially more damaging to equipment than power failures.
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na goodman
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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2014, 09:47:10 PM »
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I've always been told not to plug a printer into the battery backup side, only the surge protector outlets.
Here's what Cyber Power says about it "You should plug your PC, monitor and critical data storage devices into " Battery and Surge " outlets. Devices such as printers, speakers, scanners, and faxes should be plugged into the outlets labeled "Surge Only" since these devices require high starting current and are less critical".

Here's some more info from their site including about use with generator.
http://www.cyberpower-eu.com/support/faq_ups_answer.htm
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Malcolm Payne
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« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2014, 02:44:17 AM »
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Cyber Power are most likely referring to laser printers, which take too high a current for most 'domestic' UPS. I've been running an iPF8300 and before that an iPF8000 for at least six years from an APC Smart-UPS 750 with no problems whatsoever; the indicator LEDs rarely go above 40% load when printing, and that only intermittently.  Preferring to err on the side of caution, I chose the Smart-UPS because of its pure sine wave output, but as far as I know the cheaper Back-UPS also work without issue with these printers.

The 750VA unit will currently power the printer in standby, and a wireless access point and 5-port switch, for somewhere up to an hour (the UPS battery probably needs replacing by now, though it's showing no other signs of age); more importantly, it allows completion of a print run and a clean shutdown if an unexpected power failure occurs during printing, which was the original motivation for buying it.

I can't comment on operation with a generator as input - you'd need to speak to the manufacturers.

Malcolm
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2014, 03:10:38 AM »
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since these devices require high starting current and are less critical".
Whilst it may be true they use more power at start up (Is that really a problem here?) the idea that a printer is less critical is based more on what the UPS manufacturer's projected market is.
In this particular case of a power interruption being very costly in wasted materials and time, it is probably as 'critical' as any other part of the system.

A call to the manufacturer about an individual problem for their opinion would be best.
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jferrari
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« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2014, 05:44:33 AM »
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I don't need a UPS manufacturer telling me what is or isn't important to me. I have my Epson on a UPS for the same reasons I have my computer CPU's, external hard drives, monitors, scanner and TV on line conditioners and UPS's. The Epson draws only 70w when running. I suspect the "high start up current" comes from laser printers which have electric heating elements in them. And, just in case you don't know it, a "surge protector" is nothing more than a MOV in the line to give up it's life in the event of an extreme power surge such as a lightning strike.    - Jim
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na goodman
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« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2014, 07:46:55 AM »
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When I worked in a shop, I'm just saying I was always told not to put the printers on the battery side, they will drain your battery in no time. That's all. I use a UPS for my computer, monitors, external drives. I'm open to hour thinking, I only posted the info for reference.
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kdphotography
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« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2014, 07:59:03 AM »
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The UPS "no-no" is definitely for laser printers.  That's personal experience too.  Grin  I put my business laser printer on the surge protection side of the UPS only.  My Epson 9900 and 9890 each have their own UPS units and run well without incident using the surge/back-up side which I know also gives protection from brown outs.

ken
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Paul2660
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« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2014, 08:49:53 AM »
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The UPS "no-no" is definitely for laser printers.  That's personal experience too.  Grin  I put my business laser printer on the surge protection side of the UPS only.  My Epson 9900 and 9890 each have their own UPS units and run well without incident using the surge/back-up side which I know also gives protection from brown outs.

ken

Exactly the same experience. The 9900 works fine on the 1200 Cyberpower

Paul
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Paul Caldwell
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« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2014, 12:29:32 PM »
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Cyber Power also makes some "Pure Sine Wave" UPS that are reasonably priced.  We don't have too many blackouts but we get frequent lightning storms.  We've been hit by lightning once and nearby a few times.
To keep working during storms I substituted a large 60 amp hour battery (totally sealed from Odyssey) for the small 7 AH battery that was in the unit.  It'll run my system for 5 or 6 hours if needed.  After a heavy discharge we recharge using a large 30 amp charger. 
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Paul2660
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« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2014, 01:22:43 PM »
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That is a great idea, and one I had thought about, but my volumes are not enough to warranty it.  This gives you a totally closed loop, and no chance of Lightening coming in.  The Cyberpowers won't stop a full strike, I have been through it.  They may dampen it, but you will still get electrical issues.  I just unplug, and wait.   Smiley

Paul
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Paul Caldwell
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« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2014, 03:14:21 PM »
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That is a great idea, and one I had thought about, but my volumes are not enough to warranty it.  This gives you a totally closed loop, and no chance of Lightening coming in.  The Cyberpowers won't stop a full strike, I have been through it.  They may dampen it, but you will still get electrical issues.  I just unplug, and wait.   Smiley

Paul

I don't wait for the power to go out.  I disconnect from the grid and work off the battery.  The only thing thats a consideration is that these big batteries like to get charged at a high current rate so It takes a 30 amp car charger to refill the battery. 
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jferrari
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« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2014, 03:19:40 PM »
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In my opinion the single most important reason to have a your LFP installed on a UPS is its ASO ability. In the event of a power failure you don't lose the print you're working on at the time. I would assume that, if you are printing, your are there and can perform an orderly shut down after your print is complete. Being able to continue during an extended power failure is less important in my estimation.    - Jim
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BobDavid
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« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2014, 07:11:59 PM »
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My 7980 is plugged into an APC UPS. The UPS and all cords are off the floor. We had a lightning strike and every appliance with wires on the floor in my office (whether plugged in or not) got zapped. Apparently the wires on the floor, which is atop a two foot concrete slab, became antennas. The Epson only uses about 80 watts. That is not much of a load. A laser printer uses a lot of juice to start up and heat the drum. A UPS would not serve a laser printer.
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One Frame at a Time
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« Reply #15 on: August 21, 2014, 08:01:26 PM »
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That's interesting.  Did any of the stuff that fried have their power switches in the off position?
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