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Author Topic: Viewing Prints Again  (Read 490 times)
HSakols
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« on: August 23, 2014, 08:43:30 PM »
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Ideally I would view my prints using a GTI light box or use Solux lights.  What about the argument that most people are going to view their prints if their lucky using halogen lights.  I've even seen art galleries that just use halogen track lighting that is not exactly perfect.  Right now I use my Lowes track lighting and then use window light, but after reading through Mr. Schewe's the Digital Print I'd like to try and be more consistent.  What about using a Solux 4700 Kelvin bulb on a floor stand.  I'm thinking this would be fine to view 13x19 inch prints as they come out of the printer.   
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JayWPage
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« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2014, 09:10:56 PM »
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I've always thought it is better to view prints under the light they will be displayed under. Unfortunately this is a bit at odds with current colour management, but so be it.

If you are printing using ImagePrint they do allow for some adjustment of the print according to the type of light the print will be viewed under.
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howardm
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« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2014, 07:10:53 AM »
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Ideally I would view my prints using a GTI light box or use Solux lights.  What about the argument that most people are going to view their prints if their lucky using halogen lights.  I've even seen art galleries that just use halogen track lighting that is not exactly perfect.  Right now I use my Lowes track lighting and then use window light, but after reading through Mr. Schewe's the Digital Print I'd like to try and be more consistent.  What about using a Solux 4700 Kelvin bulb on a floor stand.  I'm thinking this would be fine to view 13x19 inch prints as they come out of the printer.   

I wouldn't gauge it as it comes out of the printer since it will definitely change as it dries.  Give it  a few hours or overnight before you judge it.  That said, in my situation, I display them in my living room which has a bunch of basic PAR incand. bulbs which run pretty warm (in color).  I have a 3100 (vs. the 4700 std) Solux near my computer and know approx how far the print has to be from the bulb in order to get the right # of lux on the print.  The monitor is profiled to around 5500 instead of D65.  I've also toyed around w/ making a profile or two based on Illum. A which is much warmer than usual but it's summer and I'm less motivated to play indoors on the computer.  Maybe in the Fall Smiley

I did all this because there was a nagging feeling that the print, when displayed wasn't what saw on the monitor so I adjusted everything to match the color of the display space.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2014, 11:20:51 AM »
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Ideally I would view my prints using a GTI light box or use Solux lights.  What about the argument that most people are going to view their prints if their lucky using halogen lights.  I've even seen art galleries that just use halogen track lighting that is not exactly perfect.  Right now I use my Lowes track lighting and then use window light, but after reading through Mr. Schewe's the Digital Print I'd like to try and be more consistent.  What about using a Solux 4700 Kelvin bulb on a floor stand.  I'm thinking this would be fine to view 13x19 inch prints as they come out of the printer.   

Unless the illuminant has a really odd (poorly behaved) spectrum, your eyes should adapt to the new conditions. OBA's in papers can exhibit issues based on some illuminants that could be considered 'daylight' (Fluorescent). The Solux spectrum is about the best plot of man made lighting I've measured or seen so expect for heat and issues controlling it, hard to beat. But again, most of us want a print viewing booth next to the display and produce WYSIWYG, after which if you move the print elsewhere, one hopes that it is of sufficient intensity and quality that you adapt to the conditions and it doesn't look 'wrong'.
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
HSakols
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« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2014, 08:15:44 PM »
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Thank you all for taking the time to answer my questions.  Andrew thank you for sharing all of your knowledge.  You help to make this forum an amazing resource. 

Hugh Sakols
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