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Author Topic: Back from Angkor/Thailand  (Read 12413 times)
collum
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« on: November 11, 2005, 11:43:34 PM »
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Back from 3 weeks in SE Asia.

While i was there i posted some images.. but very little processing done. Most will end up being platinum/pigment prints made from digital negatives

http://collum.omniblog.com

As i finish processing of some of them, i'll post the updated images, as well as a trip report.

All was shot with a Betterlight scanback/Ebony view or a 1dsmk2

             jim
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2005, 07:56:02 AM »
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Great images Jim!  Care to share any thoughts on traveling with a laptop and tethered DB?
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neil
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« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2005, 11:08:16 AM »
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Do you do your own printing or use a service.....


....if there's a service out there I'd like to know where.  
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collum
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« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2005, 12:09:11 AM »
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Quote
Do you do your own printing or use a service.....
....if there's a service out there I'd like to know where. 
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=51353\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


i do my my own.  I read an article by Dan Burkholder on the process, and started playing around with it. I like the look a lot. you print the CMY of the image onto watercolor paper (with registration marks). you then take the K layer and make a digital negative (there's a lot of calibration and work behing the "make a digital negative").  you coat the paper with platinum/palladium salts (sensitised), and then expose the paper to UV light with the negative in registration.  I use a Printing out process for platinum (called Ziatypes), that allows for a minimum of darkroom work (actually, most of it can be done in low room light.. as long as you dont' have a strong UV source in with you).  

You end up with the blacks/contrast/detail all in platinum, with the color in inkjet (pretty mute since it's not being printed on coated inkjet paper) . Since the platinum ends up in the paper, you get a depth to the prints that can't be reproduced with just inkjet.

I've started giving one-on-ones on how to do it. the interest seems to be growing in the alternative processes, so i may end up giving workshops as well.


                  jim
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dsawchuk
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« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2005, 01:47:16 PM »
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I'd just like to chime in to say I am eagerly awaiting your trip report.  

I'm heading to Southeast Asia for a few months starting early January and I'll be going to both Cambodia and Thailand. I have about 9 days with Siem Reap as a base to explore temples and the surroundings. In Thailand, I'll have close to three weeks, but this portion of the trip is a lot less planned at this point (I really need to get going on that). So any advice you have is going to be very welcome.

And thanks for sharing your photos!
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acorreia
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« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2005, 07:13:25 PM »
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Back from 3 weeks in SE Asia.
...
http://collum.omniblog.com
...
Jim !
I am going there the 8th december but only for 15 days.
Do you have more pictures ?
Thank you.  
Antonio Correia
http://antoniocorreia.smugmug.com
I just saw your site but no trace of Cambodia pictures ...
The other pictures are VERY nice.
I'll be back.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2005, 07:17:20 PM by acorreia » Logged

António Correia
www.antoniocorreia.com
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« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2005, 12:13:56 AM »
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Jim !
I am going there the 8th december but only for 15 days.
Do you have more pictures ?
Thank you. 
Antonio Correia
http://antoniocorreia.smugmug.com
I just saw your site but no trace of Cambodia pictures ...
The other pictures are VERY nice.
I'll be back.
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

You might wish to visit [a href=\"http://www.trekearth.com]Trek Earth[/url].  Follow the Gallery links to Cambodia/Thailand/Wherever.  

You will be able to see a large number of images from many different photographers.  It's a very good way to get some shot ideas.
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katemann
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« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2005, 06:25:42 AM »
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Fabulous Collum! Thanks for posting them. I confess I know nothing about betterlight.

I do hope your wife loves photography!
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acorreia
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« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2005, 06:43:32 AM »
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  = Thank you =  
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António Correia
www.antoniocorreia.com
BlasR
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« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2005, 01:14:44 PM »
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If you like to look some of my pic from cambodia go to my website

BMRWorldPhotos.com

BlasR
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jdlevy
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« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2005, 04:54:18 PM »
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Jim !
I am going there the 8th december but only for 15 days.
Do you have more pictures ?
Thank you.   
Antonio Correia\

Here are some from my trip in Feb, 2004:

Ankor Wat Pix
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freewayhuang
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« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2005, 02:37:05 AM »
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Cambodia is a great country. I have been to there one year ago. And the SIHANOUK port is a wonderful relax city.
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acorreia
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« Reply #12 on: January 08, 2006, 12:30:01 PM »
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Please have a look at some under
http://antoniocorreia.smugmug.com/
Please navigate throught the keywords.

Have you been in Burma ?
Fantastic country to visit !...
Dictatorship and no observation of the Human Rights, unfortunally.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2006, 12:31:14 PM by acorreia » Logged

António Correia
www.antoniocorreia.com
Ray
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« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2006, 08:10:11 PM »
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Hi Collum,
Looks like we both recently returned from Siem Reap. I see that some of our shots are similar. Angkor Wat is truly a photographers' paradise. If the weather had been better, I would have stayed longer. During the 5 days I was there, not once did I see a sunrise or sunset. It was so overcast a lot of the time, I had to use fill flash. It's the sort of place where one feels one needs to return to certain spots at different times of the day to get the lighting right. A bas relief with the evening sun shining at a particular angle can be so much more interesting. However, I didn't see much sun.

December might be the coolest time of the year and therefore peak season, but it doesn't seem to me to be the best time for photographers. Also, trying to get a shot of some of the ruins without  at least a few Japanese and Korean tourists moving in and out of the scene was a real problem for me. Sometimes it was more than a few; maybe a large tour-guided group, each person waiting his/her turn to be photographed in front of a thick tree root splitting apart the ancient stonework. I felt like shouting at them to get out of the way and let a 'real' photographer get a shot, but I'm far too polite for that   . Waiting for them to disperse was often worse than waiting for a break in Bangkok traffic to cross the road.

Cheers!
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2006, 09:29:15 PM »
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I was at Siem Reap about two years ago (during December peak season), and found that the temples mostly empty out during the "siesta", between about noon and two, when the tours all go back to town for their lunch break.  During those couple of hours, it's pretty easy to get photos without other tourists.  You just have to be willing to brave out the hottest time of the day and either skip lunch or take a quick picnic with you.  (It was too hot for me to feel like eating during the day, anyway - all I had between breakfast and dinner was many, many cans of cold drinks...)

Lisa
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Ray
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« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2006, 12:19:30 AM »
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Lisa,
Did you not get driven around in a tuk tuk (open carriage pulled by a motor cyclist)? That's a very effective way of cooling down. I used to carry a coat with me. At the end of the day's shooting it began to get a bit chilly for just an open neck shirt.

Being able to employ a personal chauffeur from 6am to 9pm for around US$15 a day was one of the great experiences for me at Siem Reap. Bit bumpy at times though. The roads could do with some improvement.  
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steffi
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« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2006, 08:12:15 AM »
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Just be careful where you step in Cambodia as landmines are still a big issue there.
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steffi
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« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2006, 08:27:03 AM »
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>Dictatorship and no observation of the Human Rights, unfortunally

Isn't this what we have in the US at the moment? I mean when was the last time Bush did anything about the house arrest of the democratic leader in Myanmar?
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #18 on: January 10, 2006, 11:19:08 AM »
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Did you not get driven around in a tuk tuk (open carriage pulled by a motor cyclist)? That's a very effective way of cooling down. I used to carry a coat with me. At the end of the day's shooting it began to get a bit chilly for just an open neck shirt.

Being able to employ a personal chauffeur from 6am to 9pm for around US$15 a day was one of the great experiences for me at Siem Reap. Bit bumpy at times though. The roads could do with some improvement.

It must have been a great dealer cooler when you were there.  When I was there, it was about 100 F (38 C) during the day, and even at night never got below about 85 F (29 C).  We also like to walk a lot, so we were in the guide's car only a very small fraction of the day, to get between far-flung sites.

I hear you about the roads!  We took one morning excursion to a place outside Siem Reap with Angkor-era carvings on the streambed (called something like Kbal Spean, I think?), and we were going down the very rutted dirt road at something like five miles per hour the whole way.  Of course, when we got there, there were several bus loads of Japanese and Thai tourists...

Quote
Just be careful where you step in Cambodia as landmines are still a big issue there.

Land mines are no longer any problem if you stay in the main tourist regions.  (Though the occasional unscrupulous guide will try to tell you otherwise to justify their existence, from some things I've heard...)

Lisa

Re "steffi's" second message:  This web site is about photography, not politics, and the regulars here prefer to keep it that way.  If you want to complain about political issues, please do it elsewhere.
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Ray
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« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2006, 12:14:28 PM »
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It must have been a great dealer cooler when you were there.  When I was there, it was about 100 F (38 C) during the day, and even at night never got below about 85 F (29 C).  We also like to walk a lot, so we were in the guide's car only a very small fraction of the day, to get between far-flung sites.

I hear you about the roads!  We took one morning excursion to a place outside Siem Reap with Angkor-era carvings on the streambed (called something like Kbal Spean, I think?), and we were going down the very rutted dirt road at something like five miles per hour the whole way.  Of course, when we got there, there were several bus loads of Japanese and Thai tourists...

Lisa,
The climate must be quite variable. I was there 5 days before Christmas and had no problem with the heat, but that might have been because it was overcast most of the time. I'd like to return in October shortly after the end of the monsoon when everything is very green. I expect it would be very hot and humid then but fewer tourists. I hear April/May, around the beginning of the monsoon is also a good time. After a good shower the air is beautufylly clear.
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