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Author Topic: viewing images in Photoshop...what percentage ????  (Read 3003 times)
shkj
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« on: November 20, 2005, 08:47:02 AM »
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Hi All,
I am a little confused about somthing in Photoshop...here it goes

When I open an image in Photoshop (any version) regardless of print size what percentage or what setting should I be using to view my images to get a proper perspective of how the image will look Huh

In other words should I be viewing pictures at 100% (actual pixels) or fit on screen (about 30%) Huh

Reason for asking...someone recently told me that the 100% orActual pixels setting is like looking at your printed picture 1-2" from your face...so what is the best way to view them ??

Thanks....shkj
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Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2005, 01:10:08 PM »
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when in manification mode (click on the magnifing glass on the toolbar), you can choose 'view print size' from the buttons at the top. That get's you in the ballpark though you should calibrate the viewing options in the 'preferences' to your screens DPI.

Keep in mind also that the picture is accurate at 50% and 100%, all other magnifications are based on a rough redrawing for viewing only, not for complicated tasks such as sharpening.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2005, 01:11:17 PM by pom » Logged

jdemott
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« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2005, 01:24:16 PM »
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It depends.  When you are evaluating overall composition, tonality, color balance, etc., there is no substitute for seeing the whole image, i.e., fit on screen.  When you are doing detailed editing, such as making a selection or removing spots, you need to see the image at 100 percent, i.e., actual pixels.  For some things, such as correcting CA or dealing with a tough selection problem, I may zoom in to 300 or 400 percent.  If you are trying to see what the finished print will look like, a 100 percent view may overly magnify some aspects of the image (for example, sharpening will be over-emphasized compared to what you will see in the print).  For that purpose, you probably should be viewing at 25 or 50 percent.  When you view the image at odd percentages, such as you might get when you fit on screen, PS's treatment of edges may not be an accurate reflection of what will print.

Tip:  If you find yourself zooming in and out frequently, you can open multiple windows for the same image and show the effect of your edits at different magnifications simultaneously.
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John DeMott
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