Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1] 2 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: CRASH  (Read 10694 times)
Andres Bonilla
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 565


« on: November 30, 2005, 10:43:06 PM »
ReplyReply

Ok, all hell broke loose last night, my friend came to install my new dvd drive because I was weary to try it myself. He pull the old one, it did not open, and installed the new one. When he turned the computer on it kept on restarting and finally he could not even reboot on safe mode. He told me to reformat because something went bad with the installation. Last night I did what I have done several times, I pulled my trusted Windows 2000 cd and proceded with the reformatting of my C drive, everything went smooth until the cd starting copying files, all the sudden I got a warning saying this Shell 32.dll filing was missing, then the smlogfc.dll was missing FINALLY I got the blue scrren of death that I have never gotten in my 4 years with this computer. Something about a kmode_exeption not handle it, maybe disable bios or memory options such as caching or shadowing etc. etc. I don't have a clue since this box has been solid. I use the new dvd to boot from there, should I try tonight my old cd rom? Any suggestios is appreciated.

Andres
Logged
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6883


WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2005, 10:55:33 PM »
ReplyReply

I'd help you if I could, but I can't. While some members of L-L are very computer savvy, you may find it you get more advice from a website forum that specializes in Windows XP issues.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2226



WWW
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2005, 11:11:31 PM »
ReplyReply

My first instinct from that limited description is a bad power supply.  Look in your bios, usually under Health, see if the readings are within 0.1v of the specifications.  Usually on a bad unit you'll see the 12v rail down to 11.6-11.7 or so, which only gets worse under load.  Even if that all looks good it can still be bad under load during operation especially boot or OS load.  It can also make perifrials appear broken or break.  I would swap the PS with a new one at least to rule it out - they are cheap and are only good for 2-3 years anyway.

I would also make a boot floppy with memtest and verify your ram sticks are good.  

I would also download the hard drive diagnostic from whatever your brand's website is and boot that, to check the drive.

If all that looks good I would suspect a bad motherboard, usually it means a failed drive (IDE, SATA) controller.
Logged

DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2005, 11:45:16 PM »
ReplyReply

Did you load drivers for your IDE controller at the start of the windows 2000 load?  If not you'll get errors like those.
Logged
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7856



WWW
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2005, 03:47:04 AM »
ReplyReply

Isn't that a signal from the gods of trade that your time has come to buy that new double core CPU box you've been secretely dreaming of?

Sorry not to be able to help more...

Regards,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2226



WWW
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2005, 07:03:44 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Did you load drivers for your IDE controller at the start of the windows 2000 load? If not you'll get errors like those.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=52541\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

No you don't.  specialized IDE drivers simply make some chipsets work faster, they are never needed for compatibility, the standard windows IDE drivers always work fine.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2005, 08:01:28 AM by kaelaria » Logged

DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2005, 08:07:33 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
No you don't.  specialized IDE drivers simply make some chipsets work faster, they are never needed for compatibility, the standard windows IDE drivers always work fine.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=52551\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

That's incorrect.
Logged
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2226



WWW
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2005, 08:37:20 AM »
ReplyReply

Prove it.  Show me one example of an IDE controller that NEEDS a specialized driver rather than the standard Win2k+ driver.
Logged

Jack Flesher
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2595



WWW
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2005, 09:24:55 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Prove it.  Show me one example of an IDE controller that NEEDS a specialized driver rather than the standard Win2k+ driver.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=52556\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

IMO XP is way more stable than Win 2K.  

FWIW, I have a friend that is selling his P4 3.6 HT, with 4G ram, 80G main drive with XP OS, CD writer, and three or four free expansion slots for more drives, all for $550.  Might be worth considering and you could even load your new DVD burner into it.  Maybe get your old box reconfigured as an image storage server.  Just a thought.

Good luck,
Logged

DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2005, 09:40:22 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Prove it.  Show me one example of an IDE controller that NEEDS a specialized driver rather than the standard Win2k+ driver.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=52556\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

The IDE controller in pretty much any via chipset motherboard I used back when win2k was new.

I've also had issues with one of my SIS motherboards.

No issues with Intel and I'm about 90% certain I didn't have any on my nforce boards.  (Although the IDE on the original nforce was bad enough to get me to buy a promise controller card.  Can't remember if I had issues with those or not.)

I'm sure I was mistaken, tho.
Logged
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2226



WWW
« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2005, 09:59:52 AM »
ReplyReply

Exactly right, you were mistaken.

Here's what Via says about thier IDE Driver:

"VIA IDE Miniport Driver
The VIA IDE Miniport driver is now a legacy driver that was originally designed to increase IDE performance and enhance IDE support provided by Microsoft's default driver. Much of those enhancements have now been included with Windows Service Packs however and the VIA IDE Miniport driver is not required.
This driver will increase IDE performance on NT4 based Microsoft operating systems (Win9X, NT4 & ME) but users should note that once it is installed it cannot be uninstalled."


Here's what Nvidia says about the early Win2k IDE driver:

"Improved handling of the following devices:
Sony 4821 CD-ROM
Justlink RW7200A CD-RW
Yamaha CRW2100E CR-RW
Toshiba XM-5302TA
Toshiba XM-6002B
Samsung SW-216B
Lite-On 48X CR-ROM
Teac CD-W540E
Improved compatibility with 3rd-party drive management, CD ripping and recording software.
Automatic DMA-mode fall-back when data errors are present due to poor cabling
Full NVIDIA RAID functionality on supported platforms* * Serial ATA and NVIDIA RAID functions are supported on select NVIDIA products only. Products that support this technology are identified by the * on this web page."



As I said - specialized IDE drivers are ONLY for enchancement.  If you had issues with devices working on the standard MS drivers, you had other issues to start with.

The lack of a specialized chipset/IDE driver is NOT responsible for an error on the HD or a BSoD.
Logged

DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2005, 10:04:43 AM »
ReplyReply

LOL!
Logged
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2226



WWW
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2005, 10:07:33 AM »
ReplyReply

I just noticed this thread is in the wrong section
Logged

kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2226



WWW
« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2005, 10:11:53 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Did you load drivers for your IDE controller at the start of the windows 2000 load?  If not you'll get errors like those.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=52541\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


I just realized something - perhaps you are thinking of 3rd party drivers such as RAID drivers?  Are you thinking about when you press F6 to load the driver during the OS load?
Logged

DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2005, 10:23:34 AM »
ReplyReply

It belongs on a different site more than anything else.

To explain my LOL.  After working on storage drivers (FCAL) from about 99-04, I think Via is being optimistic.

If the hardware is correct then you do not need additional drivers.  One of the problems with achieving this is that windows drivers list a set of hardware IDs that they are compatable with.   Microsoft takes compatable to mean will absolutely positively work with that piece of hardware.  If the hardware isn't correct or the drivers listed something they do not work with it will not work.  So if a vendor puts out a driver to work with all their IDE chips from now until the end of time they better be sure.  This is kind of why you'll see it look like it is going to work only to have it fail.  Because windows thinks it has a driver that will work.
Logged
DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2005, 10:26:24 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I just realized something - perhaps you are thinking of 3rd party drivers such as RAID drivers?  Are you thinking about when you press F6 to load the driver during the OS load?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=52568\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I was thinking about that, too.

He didn't indicate raid.  But what I can't recall from my raid cards (they are in the machine graveyard in my basement) is if I needed a special driver just to use them at all.  In non raid mode.
Logged
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2226



WWW
« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2005, 10:34:25 AM »
ReplyReply

Yes RAID cards need the driver before the OS load to even be seen.  If it was not loaded at that time the OS would not even have loaded - the next screen would say - Drive not found, please reboot.

You can think VIA is optimistic all you like - the fact is, if the stock driver didn't work, he would have no OS to even boot to.  As with above, if the IDE controller/chipset was not supported by the stock driver set, no drive would be found at the OS install.  It's not the issue here.

Unless you can show me something documented that says 'without this OS load level driver (F6), your IDE hard drive will not be recognized', you are incorrect.

I can't wait for the original poster to come back with the solution
« Last Edit: December 01, 2005, 10:34:50 AM by kaelaria » Logged

DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2005, 10:50:53 AM »
ReplyReply

He was reinstalling.  He got to the point where the installtion was going to copy all the files from the windows installation CD to the hard disk.  This is the point where an incorrect driver would show itself.

Whatever, tho.
Logged
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2226



WWW
« Reply #18 on: December 01, 2005, 11:01:11 AM »
ReplyReply

Wrong yet again.  

He was installing fresh, he said FORMATTING.  Also, the error he received is AFTER files start to copy.  If the driver was the issue it would NOT even get to that point - like I said, it would come back with 'Drive Not Found' and no files would even START to copy.

"I pulled my trusted Windows 2000 cd and proceded with the reformatting of my C drive, everything went smooth until the cd starting copying files, all the sudden I got a warning saying this Shell 32.dll filing was missing"
Logged

DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2005, 11:05:01 AM »
ReplyReply

It doesn't work that way.  Sorry.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad