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Author Topic: 2200 Printing Problems (aka nightmare)  (Read 4042 times)
bmischler
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« on: December 06, 2005, 11:44:12 PM »
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I have fired up my 2200 after a bit of an hiatus and am unable to get a passable print out of the thing.  On my profiled LCD screen the print looks fine; when it prints I am getting lime green in all the deep shadow areas.  

I thought it might be the driver or computer so I installed the printer on a new machine running CS2 and tried again.  Same problem and I followed the instructions in the Epson manual to the letter.  I have also tried a variety of work flow methods reccomended on a couple of sites and haven't had any success.

This isn't a custom profile issue as it is a very bad print and not just a bit off.  I have had issues with my printer in one way or another since the beginning but I always thought it was me, now I'm starting to think I have a faulty printer.

Any suggestions short of throwing it off a bridge or buying a new 2400?

Bob

PS - I called Epson customer support and they were completely useless.
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Richowens
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« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2005, 01:30:35 AM »
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Hi Bob,
It sounds to me that the printer is not laying down magenta. Have you run a nozzle check to make sure all the nozzles are firing?
 
My printer developed an air bubble in magenta and what should be a dark brown came out a bright green. A couple of cleaning cycles took care of the problem. It is also possible that after sitting a while, it developed a clog.

Rather than throwing it off a bridge and fouling the environment, send it to me and go buy the 2400.  

Rich
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kbolin
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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2005, 01:31:24 AM »
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Any suggestions short of throwing it off a bridge or buying a new 2400?

Oh I only wish I could get a 2400 that easily.    

Kelly
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Dale_Cotton
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« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2005, 08:13:22 AM »
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>  A couple of cleaning cycles took care of the problem. It is also possible that after sitting a while, it developed a clog.

That's my guess too.

You may find it takes more than a couple cleaning cycles for a stubborn clog. If you do them back to back without closing the nozzle check dialogue, each cycle will use twice the ink of the previous one, so doing more than a few can be costly. Another thing is that if you do several cleans and the problem has been reduced but not entirely eliminated, stop to let the fresh ink soak into the clog over night.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2005, 02:10:40 PM »
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>  A couple of cleaning cycles took care of the problem. It is also possible that after sitting a while, it developed a clog.

That's my guess too.

You may find it takes more than a couple cleaning cycles for a stubborn clog. If you do them back to back without closing the nozzle check dialogue, each cycle will use twice the ink of the previous one, so doing more than a few can be costly. Another thing is that if you do several cleans and the problem has been reduced but not entirely eliminated, stop to let the fresh ink soak into the clog over night.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=52979\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
That happened to me, too, after being away from my 2200 for about three weeks last year. Several cleaning cycles failed to improve the truly *awful* prints, and I was about ready to head for the bridge. But an overnight and a couple more cleaning cycles (lots of paper and ink down the tube by this time, but less waste than one ink switch in the 4800     ), and it came back to life beautifully.

-Eric
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
Don Davis
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« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2005, 06:30:26 AM »
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I haven't seen a resolution to your problem but I just had a similar experience.  Local Epson repair shop said after testing, that my Magenta jets were not firing.  They suggested sending back to Epson, which charges a flat $189 including shipping to repair any and everything.  Not cheap, but cheaper than a new printer not to mention saving my investment in CIS inks, etc.  Hope you were able to fix your 2200.

Quote
I have fired up my 2200 after a bit of an hiatus and am unable to get a passable print out of the thing. On my profiled LCD screen the print looks fine; when it prints I am getting lime green in all the deep shadow areas.

I thought it might be the driver or computer so I installed the printer on a new machine running CS2 and tried again. Same problem and I followed the instructions in the Epson manual to the letter. I have also tried a variety of work flow methods reccomended on a couple of sites and haven't had any success.

This isn't a custom profile issue as it is a very bad print and not just a bit off. I have had issues with my printer in one way or another since the beginning but I always thought it was me, now I'm starting to think I have a faulty printer.

Any suggestions short of throwing it off a bridge or buying a new 2400?

Bob

PS - I called Epson customer support and they were completely useless.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=52966\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
« Last Edit: December 26, 2005, 06:35:19 AM by Don Davis » Logged
lightandimages
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« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2005, 11:30:35 PM »
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I haven't seen a resolution to your problem but I just had a similar experience.  Local Epson repair shop said after testing, that my Magenta jets were not firing.  They suggested sending back to Epson, which charges a flat $189 including shipping to repair any and everything.  Not cheap, but cheaper than a new printer not to mention saving my investment in CIS inks, etc.  Hope you were able to fix your 2200.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=54315\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Before spending the money, you can buy cleaning cartridges that run a solvent through the print nozzles. I have a Epson 1280 which used to clog after just a few days. After a week long vacation, the cleaning cartridge was the only way to recover. Then I got smart and bought a CIS system where the ink doesnt clog even after weeks and my prints look just as good as the Epson ink.

MikeS
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Jo Irps
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« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2005, 08:24:44 AM »
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Bob,

it sounds you have a clogged nozzel and the power clean does not clear that nozzel. Therefore it becomes nessecary to do more than just power clean the nozzels. Instead sending the printer back to Epson, you can do the following yourself (I've copied this from an website which does not exist anymore, but the cleaning method remains very useful). You simple soak the nozzels with Windex, that will unclog them. Here is how it is being done:

Quote: "Set the paper thickness lever to '+' or as thick a setting as it will take. Take some tissue (ideally disposable lint-free cloth, perhaps a thin 'sponge' cloth as shown to the right) and fold it up tightly if necessary, but not so that it is too thick for the print head to move over it. You may need to cut a strip of the material as appropriate. Lay it on the black plastic towards the left of the printer - you may find it easier to tape it down at each end (again, not really necessary in our experience if you can get some sponge cloth about 3-4mm thick). You now dampen the cloth with an appropriate cleaning fluid, Windex is very good.

After switching the printer off, move the print head by hand over the damp cloth. Once you can move the head as you will, move the head over the tissue in several smooth passes back and forwards. You will see that ink passes onto the strip. Sometimes it is nessecary to leave the head for a short time over the cloth so that the dried ink in the nozzels are well saoked.
 
Once you have finished, return and lock the printhead, and return the paper setting to its previous position. This operation will frequently need to be followed by a head-clean utility (power clean) before any improvements are seen, as the rubbing action may pull ink out of the nozzles." Unquote.

This method works well on all printers and had helped me and many others I know who had clogged nozzels on their printers.

Good luck.
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Jo Irps
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« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2005, 05:09:13 AM »
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Correction to my last post:

Instead of switching the printer off, you pull the power cord, that lets you move the print head freely. After finishing the cleaning process just put the power cord back in.
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