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Author Topic: Snowy Montana Hills  (Read 5621 times)
Jonathan Wienke
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« on: December 30, 2005, 09:26:43 AM »
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Comments appreciated...

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mikeseb
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« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2005, 09:45:56 AM »
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Join the Army, see the world, eh?

I must say, seeing Montana in the winter makes me wonder why this Louisiana native even ventured as far north as Kentucky! It is starkly beautiful, however, and your image has done it justice.

I wonder if the grassy stuff in the foreground could be cropped to good effect, with end crops as needed to keep your desired proportions? A small quibble.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2005, 09:46:33 AM by mikeseb » Logged

michael sebastian
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« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2005, 10:17:34 AM »
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Adding to Mike's comments, it would also be nice to see a hint of detail in the middle and right hand fence posts. Other than that, well done!
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Neutral Hills Stills
A visual journey through this unique area of East Central Alberta, Canada.
jdemott
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« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2005, 12:32:48 PM »
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It is nice to see a high key treatment, which is very effectively done in this shot.  I like the shapes of the hills with the repeated slopes providing a rhythm to the composition.

The camera placement puts the fence essentially in the middle of the frame, describing a nearly horizontal line bisecting the frame.  Since the fence is so dominant visually, that results in what to me is a somewhat static composition.  A little different perspective could make the fence into a more dynamic diagonal line and also result in cropping some of the distracting grass in the foreground.  Here's a quick attempt with the Lens Correction filter.  Just my two cents worth.


[attachment=109:attachment]
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John DeMott
Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2005, 01:27:41 PM »
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Quote
The camera placement puts the fence essentially in the middle of the frame, describing a nearly horizontal line bisecting the frame.  Since the fence is so dominant visually, that results in what to me is a somewhat static composition.  A little different perspective could make the fence into a more dynamic diagonal line and also result in cropping some of the distracting grass in the foreground.
An interesting idea worth consideration. One of the main reasons for shooting from the spot I did was to tie the interval between the fence posts and the interval between the hills together, which I thought was visually interesting. The only way to get that and the more diagonal perspective is either with the Lens Correction filter or a lens with movements.

As to the detail in the fence posts, it's there in the full-res image, but did not survive the downsizing for web. There's only so much detail you can pack into a web JPEG.  
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jule
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« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2005, 02:59:19 PM »
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What about this crop? The spacing and rhythm of the fence posts and the mountains seems to stand out more without the grass in the foreground.

Julie

[attachment=110:attachment]
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jani
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« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2006, 04:23:42 PM »
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What about this crop? The spacing and rhythm of the fence posts and the mountains seems to stand out more without the grass in the foreground.
Ah, I like this one.

The former suggestions didn't really interest me, and I was about to skip to some other thread until I saw the tiny icon for the attachment. It's striking as a thumbnail, and intriguing at the size we've got available.
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Jan
Peter McLennan
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« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2006, 05:38:39 PM »
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I love the shot and I love the crops.  The matching rhythms of fence posts and hilltops really pleases the eye.  Simplicity.

We gonna miss you, Jonathan.


Peter
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2006, 08:17:08 PM »
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Well, after playing around with things, here's what I decided on:



Thanks for all the kind words. I leave for boot camp early Wednesday morning.
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jule
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« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2006, 08:24:06 PM »
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You've got it now Jonathan! Great image. All the best.
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