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Author Topic: New Zealand Pics  (Read 4116 times)
chapmandu
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« on: January 01, 2006, 11:45:36 AM »
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Hi all,

I was lucky enough to spend almost 6 weeks in New Zealand and Australia this summer (their winter) and took along my newly aquired EOS 350D.  I thoroughly enjoyed the trip and it really rekindled my interest in photography, I'd definitely recommend NZ as a place to go for any photographer, the scenery is amazing.

Anyway, I know these aren't that hot but here is a collection of my favourite shots all taken with the bog standard kit lens.  

New Zealand/Australia Pics

In particular I'd be really interested in comments on the Mt Cook, Taieri Gorge, Lewis Pass, and  Lake Taupo images embedded below as I'd regard these as the best ones photographically (feel free to disagree!) - the others I like for the memories they evoke.  Any other general pointers I'd appreciate too!

They were all shot in RAW and post processed using Canon's DPP - all I've really done is tweak the exposure and that's it.  I'd love to get a feel for how much more I could get out of the shots with some decent post processing, particularly with regards sharpening.  Any comments?

Cheers, and Happy New Year!

Phil

Mt Cook from the air


Taieri Gorge Railway


Lewis Pass


Lake Taupo
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jule
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« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2006, 07:29:13 PM »
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Hi Chapmandu,
Thanks for posting your images. I viewed all your images from your site and yes, you do have a good collection of images which I'm sure evoke wonderful memories, but none for me that really have that 'wow' factor. Being from Austraila, most of the scenes I have seen captured many times before - in the same way. I myself have albums full of similar shots.

Something which I found useful when taking images - especially of holidays, was to take a few images of the general scene/area to remember the location, then specifically take a few risks and experiment with viewing the world in a different way. I do it unconsciously now - but would scan and find something which was striking or interesting and sense what made it interesting, and then endeavour to take an image which highlighted or supported that characteristic.

Just for example - your image of Lake Taupo, I would focus on the expansiveness of the lake, and frame most of the reflection on the water and omit most of the sky. Try cropping out most of the clouded sky and notice how the feel of the image changes.

I have a pet grumble with shadows in the foreground which I find distracting in Taupo Pass. Did you try to take some images of the textures and colours of the grasses?

Perhaps having the yellow train a little closer may have added a bit of drama to the image Taieri Gorge Railway - yet still keeping it in context in its' environment.

Just a few comments. I still have a long way to go, but I saw my images evolve for the better when I adopted this approach of enjoying 'taking the happy snap'...then really go for it and take risks. Now my happy snaps are more creative and interesting, and I have become more astute and perceptive in what I see - even when I don't have my camera with me  
Julie

edited spelling
« Last Edit: January 01, 2006, 11:57:29 PM by jule » Logged

chapmandu
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2006, 06:41:33 AM »
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Julie,

Thanks very much for your comments and suggestions, they're really useful.  As you say, I'm glad to have a fairly decent set of photos to remember my holiday by, but as photos in their own right I didn't feel that there were really any that I could imagine anyone else being especially interested in - as you say they lack that 'wow' factor, and thousands of almost identical images probably exist in the world!!  It's useful to have had that feeling confirmed by another photographer!

Regarding your specific comments on the images, I like your suggestion for the Lake Taupo image.  Something I noticed in a lot of my images when I got back was the fact that I often tended to have horizons in the middle whereas it would make for a more interesting photo to concentrate on either the sky or the ground.  

The Lewis Pass image was actually taken from a lay-by which was some 10-15 feet above the river bed.  I'd have loved to have got down to the same level as the river but would probably have broken my ankle in negotiating the steep bank!  

I do have some other frames of the train crossing the viaduct where the train was further along but preferred this one because the context was more obvious, plus in the other shots the pillar in the foreground was even more prominent!  I'll take another look at these though.

One thing I often found was the sense of being rushed - people were waiting for me to take the photo, I was in the way, we had to be somewhere else etc etc - so in some situations I feel I could have got a more interesting shot had I had the time to give it some more thought.  Is this something you find?

Anyway, thanks again for your suggestions, very much appreciated!

Phil
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boku
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« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2006, 08:12:14 AM »
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Quote
One thing I often found was the sense of being rushed - people were waiting for me to take the photo, I was in the way, we had to be somewhere else etc etc - so in some situations I feel I could have got a more interesting shot had I had the time to give it some more thought. Is this something you find?

Always, even when I am with a group or a companion, I work in solitude. If we stop and chat, it is just that. If we move on, I am social. But once I plant my tripod, I do not allow myself to be distracted or rushed. If I am with a group, I respect that in others as well. When I go for a drive with my wife, the most I hope for is snapshots.

As landscape photographers, much of what we do is waiting for the light to change. How can you do that with someone waiting to move on?
« Last Edit: January 02, 2006, 08:13:12 AM by boku » Logged

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jule
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« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2006, 04:38:52 PM »
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QUOTE(chapmandu @ Jan 2 2006, 07:41 AM)
One thing I often found was the sense of being rushed - people were waiting for me to take the photo, I was in the way, we had to be somewhere else etc etc - so in some situations I feel I could have got a more interesting shot had I had the time to give it some more thought.  Is this something you find?


Quote
Always, even when I am with a group or a companion, I work in solitude. If we stop and chat, it is just that. If we move on, I am social. But once I plant my tripod, I do not allow myself to be distracted or rushed. If I am with a group, I respect that in others as well. When I go for a drive with my wife, the most I hope for is snapshots.

As landscape photographers, much of what we do is waiting for the light to change. How can you do that with someone waiting to move on?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=55008\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Yes Phil, I am a very solo photographer. When I get the urge to do some photography, I spend the day- or go away for a few days, on my own. I can then take as long as I wish, whether it be walking the streets, in a country town, city or landscape/nature.

When we are on family holidays or outings it has become a bit of a family joke when I exclaim...Ooooh, please stop the car - there's a fantastic image there!. I am met with a chorus of loving NOOOOOOOOO's from our teenage sons in the back seat, who are used to me being spontaneous like that. Of course the car is stopped, and I do my best to capture and explore the image, being respectful that it is a family outing - not a photographic journey. I would accept the lighting conditions as they were and I would nearly almost spend more time if I were on my own, but happy to have the opportunity at all - one or two a stops in an 8 hour drive is considered a fair thing in our home.

I often have noted interesting locations and have made time to spend a few days travelling on my own to revisit them. ... sometimes the lighting is better as I have more time to wait, or sometimes not as good as it was when I first saw it. My family realise this, so are very accommodating, patient, and do not rush me when I ask to stop. I probably put more pressure on myself to hurry rather than they do.

The intention of the journey needs to be considered and everyone respected. For me, with tourist type tours - enjoy the country, company, culture and happy snaps. With family - communicate and negotiate a happy agreement with regard to the intention of the journey. With a photographic partner or group of photographers, there is greater freedom but still being respectful of others, and itineries. Going solo - no excuses !    

Julie
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