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Author Topic: World's most expensive...  (Read 32508 times)
ckelly
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« Reply #40 on: May 17, 2006, 12:12:55 PM »
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if you can check out the may 2006 issue of Shutterbug.  there is an article in there about a tricked out customizable off road van.  Sportsmobile.com
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AdrianW
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« Reply #41 on: May 17, 2006, 01:46:31 PM »
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Glad I'm not the only that's been thinking about this sort of thing!

I'm sure the cheapest option is to just get a reasonable step-ladder (a-frame ladder), and then a clamp tripod attachment - probably more stable too, just as long as you aren't jumping around on the ladder ;)
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BobShram
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« Reply #42 on: May 17, 2006, 09:00:52 PM »
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I have been using a 4x4 pickup with a glassfiber top for a number of years. I spread the load over the top to go directly down the sides and onto the frame using 12x2's, 2inch galzanised pipe and stuff from the local hardware store. The seat and tripod sit in 2inch and 6inch plastic drain pipe ends screweded to the 12x2's. The coffee cup holder is attached to the seat arm! Both the seat and the tripod can be locked to the 12x2's and as long as the branches are not to low and you trust the driver you could I supose click and drive. To get up I leave the tailgate down and the back window closed and use a two step ladder to get on the tailgate, then lift the ladder onto the tailgate and climb onto the 12x2's.

I alway make sure I have all my stuff including coffee with me when I get up. The dog stays down and normaly lays by a front wheel.

I do a lot of stuff in the New Jersey cranberry bogs and around sunset at certain times in the year the bugs are out in force. The extra hight helps keep them away and you can see them swaming below.

Although it is not a thing of great beauty, it works for me.

Bob
« Last Edit: May 20, 2006, 11:34:26 AM by BobShram » Logged
schaefej
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« Reply #43 on: May 19, 2006, 12:11:56 PM »
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John,

I had been wanting a roof-top platform for 30 yrs, ever since I first saw the picture of AA ("Camera and Lens," p. 63) on top of his International Harvester.  About 10 years ago I built a removable one of sand-varnished 3/4" plywood attached to a Yakima rack on top of my Volvo V70.  Looked weird as hell, cut the gase mileage, and was "removable" only with the help of friends -- but it worked great.  After a few years, the ply started to separate, and I thought of replacing it with marine ply, but when I found how expensive it was, decided I might as well go with planks:  easier to put on/take off.  I thought I'd use thick cedar boards, but was convinced to go with Ipe, since it was rock-solid and I could extend the platform farther out beyond the supports.  Well, 6-foot planks worked beautifully, looked great, and I got some nice photos ... but the wood was SO heavy (it doesn't even float) that its weight broke one of the support towers ... twice.  

The wood's back in the basement, and if I do this again, it will probably be on a pickup truck with a VERY heavy-duty rack system.  In that case, I'd extend the wood over the cab.  In the interim, the Volvo now has >200K on it, so I just climb on top of the roof....

jim schaefer
(a displaced Minnesotan myself)
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stever
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« Reply #44 on: June 22, 2006, 08:10:23 PM »
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the relatively inexpensive solution is a pickup with good sturdy rack that you can put a platform on - they transfer the weight to the bed/frame similar to the defender photos and widely used by contractors to haul big loads

you can choose any pickup with crew or regular cab, 2 or 4 wheel drive, etc. -- some of the racks may work with a shell on the back as well -- there are a huge number of choices
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HiltonP
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« Reply #45 on: July 06, 2006, 12:32:42 PM »
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I realize this thread is old, and the original question has been addressed, but the attached link shows just what can be attached to the roof of a Toyota 4Runner (here is SA we call them Twin- or Double- Cabs)

http://www.britz.co.za/safari.htm

This is not special equipment here, these add-ons are readily available.
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Regards, HILTON
bnydam42
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« Reply #46 on: July 29, 2006, 04:46:08 PM »
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I too realize that this thread is old, but I just ran across the ultimate in off road photography.  With all the amenities of an RV and the power of...well...a lot of power, easy access to the roof, perfectly stable in any condition anywhere....
Introducing the OSHKOSH Expedition Class AWD Motorhome:
http://www.steelwheels4x4.com/index.htm
http://www.gizmag.com/go/3708/
« Last Edit: July 29, 2006, 04:46:44 PM by bnydam42 » Logged
Rokcet Scientist
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« Reply #47 on: August 13, 2006, 08:56:23 AM »
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Quote
I have a 4x4 SUV which is coming to the end of its useful life, and which I have thoroughly beat around (including a trip to Dead Horse, on the Arctic Ocean in Alaska, from Minnesota), and I'm now starting to think of a new vehicle. One problem that I think most landscape people have is getting just a little bit higher than where you are, to see over local bushes and scrub, especially when the scene you're trying to shoot is flat, or falling away from you. What I'm getting to is this -- In my new vehicle, I'd like to be able to stand on the roof.

The problem with most vans and 4x4s is that you can't stand on the roof. I thought about mounting a sheet of 3/4 inch plywood with U-bolts to the roof rack, which I've been told will take 500 pounds. That would work, but it'd be ugly and, I'm afraid, noisy, and would get me even worse gas mileage. I'll probably do that, though, if a better solution doesn't present itself. I've tried carrying one of those short, multi-extendable ladders, but you can't use a tripod with a ladder.

Does anybody know of a vehicle that has a roof you can stand on? Has anybody else worked out a solution to this problem? I would also like to keep the solution, whatever it is, fairly low, so I can park in a standard home garage and in standard parking structures.

Right now, I'm thinking plywood platform with a sailing life belt to keep me from falling off and killing myself, with maybe some kind of simple apparatus that would keep the the tripod from falling off, as well...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=55033\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I submit you'll get 10 times as many photo ops if you can bring yourself to actually leave the car a couple miles behind and hike.
Much better for your cardio-vascular system too!
And, after all those years, you'd finally get photos with a different perspective . . .
« Last Edit: August 14, 2006, 10:06:44 PM by Rokcet Scientist » Logged
Tristan
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« Reply #48 on: September 15, 2006, 05:44:36 PM »
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Quote
I have a 4x4 SUV which is coming to the end of its useful life, and which I have thoroughly beat around (including a trip to Dead Horse, on the Arctic Ocean in Alaska, from Minnesota), and I'm now starting to think of a new vehicle. One problem that I think most landscape people have is getting just a little bit higher than where you are, to see over local bushes and scrub, especially when the scene you're trying to shoot is flat, or falling away from you. What I'm getting to is this -- In my new vehicle, I'd like to be able to stand on the roof.

The problem with most vans and 4x4s is that you can't stand on the roof. I thought about mounting a sheet of 3/4 inch plywood with U-bolts to the roof rack, which I've been told will take 500 pounds. That would work, but it'd be ugly and, I'm afraid, noisy, and would get me even worse gas mileage. I'll probably do that, though, if a better solution doesn't present itself. I've tried carrying one of those short, multi-extendable ladders, but you can't use a tripod with a ladder.

Does anybody know of a vehicle that has a roof you can stand on? Has anybody else worked out a solution to this problem? I would also like to keep the solution, whatever it is, fairly low, so I can park in a standard home garage and in standard parking structures.

Right now, I'm thinking plywood platform with a sailing life belt to keep me from falling off and killing myself, with maybe some kind of simple apparatus that would keep the the tripod from falling off, as well...

JC
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=55033\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Why not get out of the SUV and use those things called legs. You'll get far better pictures. Perhaps also think of the environment and drop the SUV altogether.
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John Camp
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« Reply #49 on: September 15, 2006, 07:07:43 PM »
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Quote
I too realize that this thread is old, but I just ran across the ultimate in off road photography.  With all the amenities of an RV and the power of...well...a lot of power, easy access to the roof, perfectly stable in any condition anywhere....
Introducing the OSHKOSH Expedition Class AWD Motorhome:
http://www.steelwheels4x4.com/index.htm
http://www.gizmag.com/go/3708/
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=72081\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

That IS the world's most expensive tripod. Wonder if it gets four miles a gallon?


Quote
I submit you'll get 10 times as many photo ops if you can bring yourself to actually leave the car a couple miles behind and hike.
Much better for your cardio-vascular system too!
And, after all those years, you'd finally get photos with a different perspective . . .

[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=73224\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Quote
Why not get out of the SUV and use those things called legs. You'll get far better pictures. Perhaps also think of the environment and drop the SUV altogether.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=76509\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Jeez, you mean it's that easy? Why didn't I think of that?

JC
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Jay Kaplan
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« Reply #50 on: September 15, 2006, 10:01:47 PM »
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Quote
I too realize that this thread is old, but I just ran across the ultimate in off road photography. With all the amenities of an RV and the power of...well...a lot of power, easy access to the roof, perfectly stable in any condition anywhere....
Introducing the OSHKOSH Expedition Class AWD Motorhome:
http://www.steelwheels4x4.com/index.htm
http://www.gizmag.com/go/3708/
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=72081\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I saw that thing on cable, the guy who build it started with a former fire engine used at airports to fight fires that occur when an airliner crashes. I guess he had a little too much spare time on his hands.  
« Last Edit: September 15, 2006, 10:02:33 PM by Jake21209 » Logged
richallcorn
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« Reply #51 on: October 10, 2006, 09:23:39 PM »
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I recently purchased a roof rack for my JEEP.  The rack itself supports a payload of over 500lbs!  It's stirdy, strong, and built "tough"!  I added an overhead safari rack to it which would allow you to do the same.  Then, on the bottom of the rack ,you could put your thin sheet of plywood or something grating for a floor.  The rack itself has a lot of support rungs ... the flat panel would just be to give you a fully "solid" floor.  But this will work!
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