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Author Topic: Looking to purchase flash and/or lighting.  (Read 2709 times)
saiine
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« on: January 04, 2006, 12:39:19 PM »
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Hey guys, I recently read this tutorial http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/index3.html - which is amazing, very thorough.

I've had my camera for a few months now (rebel xt) and am looking to start practicing portraits, studio shots. I've read on this forum about Alien Bee's, and setting up 2 800's and 2 400's.

I'm torn at this point between getting studio lighting or getting a nice Canon flash.

Any advice, or tutorials you guys can point me to.

My goals are setup studio shots. I'd love to have the hot shoe flash eventually, as the flash on my Rebel produces a slighy dark moon near the bottom of the picture when using the 17-40 L.

Thanks
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Hank
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« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2006, 12:58:10 PM »
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There's a good discussion for you   here.

Depending upon your location, there may be a studio supply store nearby with rental equipment.  It's far better to rent (or borrow) gear and try it out before buying, than to buy things that won't meet your needs.  We have availed ourselves of such shops on several occasions while travelling, rather than shipping lights for a job.  As a rule of thumb the variety is good, as are the quality and condition of the gear.
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2006, 03:44:42 PM »
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Once you use studio strobes in a studio setting, any other lighting is archaic by comparison.

IF you have the studio space, then by all means get some good lights.  BUT you don't need 4 heads to start with and you might be better off buying an older used pack outfit for less money than the AB's...  

In addition to the lights, you'll want decent stands, umbrellas or softboxes and a decent flash-meter.
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saiine
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« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2006, 05:39:58 PM »
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Thanks for the advice, I'm looking at the $599 pack on the AB site, and adding a softbox.

2 AlienBees B400 Flash Units
2 CB1 Single Light Carrying Bags
2 LS3050 10-foot General Purpose Light Stands
1 U48TWB 48-inch Translucent White "Shoot-Thru" Umbrella
1 U48SW 48-inch Silver/White Reversible Bounce Umbrella

$599.00

Although I am somewhat ignorant with studio lighting and gear as it's my first week researching it. I'm going to buy the science light and magic book I've heard so much about, it gives examples of setups. I remember reading a review where a college professor said it was the textbook for the class.

Can you explain what the softbox will do vs an umbrella, is it just a diffuser?

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Once you use studio strobes in a studio setting, any other lighting is archaic by comparison.

IF you have the studio space, then by all means get some good lights.  BUT you don't need 4 heads to start with and you might be better off buying an older used pack outfit for less money than the AB's... 

In addition to the lights, you'll want decent stands, umbrellas or softboxes and a decent flash-meter.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=55205\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2006, 06:28:06 PM »
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Can you explain what the softbox will do vs an umbrella, is it just a diffuser?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=55218\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Generally speaking, a reflector changes the direction of light and softens it slightly in the process.  A diffusion panel, scrim or soft box remains directional, but softens light even more than a reflector by creating a broader, more even light-source.

An umbrella generally reflects light off a white or partially silvered interior which softens it -- so in its basic form it a reflector.  Its advantage over a regular reflector is it is rigid when open and can be easily positioned on a stand.  It also  generates a circular specular highlight which is preferred on many subjects, like catch-lights in eyes for example.

A soft-box is a self-contained diffuser and as such maintains a relatively consistent effect.  The better ones generate very even lighting across their surface and usually have internal diffusion panels you can change/combine to vary the effect.  

Finally, some umbrella designs have a removable cover and let you "shoot-through" them thus behaving more like a soft-box, giving you a two-fer in a compact, inexpensive package.
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saiine
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« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2006, 08:10:41 PM »
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Thanks for the thorough reply! Really helps me out. Any advice on books to learn typical setups for lights?


Quote
Generally speaking, a reflector changes the direction of light and softens it slightly in the process.  A diffusion panel, scrim or soft box remains directional, but softens light even more than a reflector by creating a broader, more even light-source.

An umbrella generally reflects light off a white or partially silvered interior which softens it -- so in its basic form it a reflector.  Its advantage over a regular reflector is it is rigid when open and can be easily positioned on a stand.  It also  generates a circular specular highlight which is preferred on many subjects, like catch-lights in eyes for example.

A soft-box is a self-contained diffuser and as such maintains a relatively consistent effect.  The better ones generate very even lighting across their surface and usually have internal diffusion panels you can change/combine to vary the effect. 

Finally, some umbrella designs have a removable cover and let you "shoot-through" them thus behaving more like a soft-box, giving you a two-fer in a compact, inexpensive package.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=55225\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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Ronny Nilsen
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« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2006, 01:15:48 AM »
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Thanks for the thorough reply! Really helps me out. Any advice on books to learn typical setups for lights?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=55230\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I have "Master Lighting Guide for Portrait Photographers" by Christopher Grey and found it to be a good reference to learn baic studio setup with good examples on how different ligthing affects the picture.
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