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Author Topic: Iview media pro  (Read 4701 times)
Wil Hershberger
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« on: January 05, 2006, 08:55:38 AM »
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Michael recommends the use of Iview media pro for image cataloging.  It appears to be a terrific application.  However, it appears to have trouble preparing a thumbnail of layered psd files.  Is there a work around for this? Is there a way to have PhotoShop CS2 embed a thumbnail or a way to get Iview to make one from the layered psd?

Also, when creating catalog sets to organize images is there a way to sort these catalog sets alphabetically.
Thanks in advance,
Wil
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poliwog
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« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2006, 06:24:44 PM »
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Just make sure you have PS set to save a composite file with your image.

Les

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Michael recommends the use of Iview media pro for image cataloging.  It appears to be a terrific application.  However, it appears to have trouble preparing a thumbnail of layered psd files.  Is there a work around for this? Is there a way to have PhotoShop CS2 embed a thumbnail or a way to get Iview to make one from the layered psd?

Also, when creating catalog sets to organize images is there a way to sort these catalog sets alphabetically.
Thanks in advance,
Wil
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Wil Hershberger
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« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2006, 06:27:49 PM »
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Just make sure you have PS set to save a composite file with your image.

Les
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Thanks Les.  Where would I find that option?
Thanks a lot,
Wil
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2006, 11:49:12 PM »
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It's the "Maximize Compatibility" option. Change it from Ask to Always.
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Pelao
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« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2006, 10:16:26 AM »
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Michael recommends the use of Iview media pro for image cataloging.  It appears to be a terrific application.  However, it appears to have trouble preparing a thumbnail of layered psd files.  Is there a work around for this? Is there a way to have PhotoShop CS2 embed a thumbnail or a way to get Iview to make one from the layered psd?

Also, when creating catalog sets to organize images is there a way to sort these catalog sets alphabetically.
Thanks in advance,
Wil
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=55261\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
What's interesting to me is that in the latest Video Journals (12 & 13) Michael mentions just using the Operating System file structure. The Mac OS has an outstanding search facility and the new Windows version (Vista) coming out this year will have the same thing. So for many there are limited advantages to using a specialized application.

I have long just used my folder structure and simply applied discipline to file names, folder names, keywords etc. The you can search and view using the OS, or Bridge, which you get with CS2.
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Nick Rains
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« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2006, 08:54:21 PM »
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Spotlight is indeed a handy tool, but you must remember that an OS catalogue system is only a searchable list.

Specialised apps like IView maintain a discrete database of thumbs of both online and offline images - that is the crucial difference. It is unlikely that anyone would store all their images fully online and I imagine that an OS system would have trouble with many Tb of image data.

Specialised apps are usually better at what they do than general OS apps.
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Nick Rains
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Pelao
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« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2006, 09:51:40 PM »
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Spotlight is indeed a handy tool, but you must remember that an OS catalogue system is only a searchable list.

Specialised apps like IView maintain a discrete database of thumbs of both online and offline images - that is the crucial difference. It is unlikely that anyone would store all their images fully online and I imagine that an OS system would have trouble with many Tb of image data.

Specialised apps are usually better at what they do than general OS apps.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=55395\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Certainly iView can do more than the OS, but most of the extra things can be done through Bridge, which you get with CS2 anyway.

Also, if you store images on an external drive, CD or DVD, once you attach or insert those media Spotlight can search them too, just as fast as the computers dedicated drive.

Once you enter your filename and/or keywords in, say, bridge, Spotlight can find them in anything attached to the computer.
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2006, 10:10:15 PM »
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Certainly iView can do more than the OS, but most of the extra things can be done through Bridge, which you get with CS2 anyway.

Also, if you store images on an external drive, CD or DVD, once you attach or insert those media Spotlight can search them too, just as fast as the computers dedicated drive.

Once you enter your filename and/or keywords in, say, bridge, Spotlight can find them in anything attached to the computer.
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Yes Spotlight can search items once they're plugged in/inserted quite quickly, however, that's missing the point. The ability to search items without connecting them is much more useful and quicker.

Both methods find your files, but using the Finder is "Just not the same™."
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Pelao
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« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2006, 08:08:27 AM »
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Yes Spotlight can search items once they're plugged in/inserted quite quickly, however, that's missing the point. The ability to search items without connecting them is much more useful and quicker.

Both methods find your files, but using the Finder is "Just not the same™."
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Yes, of course iView has the ability to search its own thumbnail database regardless of where the media is stored.

Having found your image though, you then have to attach or insert the media to do anything with it.

I am not saying iView is a poor choice as an app. I have used it, and managed a creative team that used it. What I would recommend though, is that potential users carefully consider their choices. Applications such as iView are not inexpensive and introduce yet another set of processes to be learned. Therefore, I suggest carefully thinking through your needs and options.

I am not a professional photographer, but I do have many thousands of images I need to access quickly, and which need to be backed up securely.

Once I have downloaded my images I batch rename and keyword them in Bridge. I am very careful regarding the file names and keywords. The process takes a few minutes. Then I transfer them to an external drive, my working drive. This drive is automatically backed up to another drive. When I want to find an image I search through bridge.

I can also search in the finder using the Spotlight process, save as a Smart Folder and burn to a CD or DVD, all very fast. I can quickly point Bridge at  the Smart Folder to view the images in more detail, or I can simply run a slideshow right in Finder.

In addition to my working drive I have several other drives, all full of images. They are connected to my computer via Firewire hub. Therefore Bridge and / or Finder can search all my drives at any time.

I feel that over the years we have been 'trained' to expect that specific, powerful applications will always be required to run important tasks. The introduction of effective system searches is changing the field and requires a different way of thinking. I know a number of pros who now use their own folder system and either the OS or relatively simple applications for managing their library. A cricial element is that they apply a lot of thought and discipline to folder / file names and keywords.

I am sure iView and its competitors have other avluable features, but I really suggest those who do not yet have these appl;ications consider whether or not they really need the cost and learning curve.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2006, 08:09:33 AM by Pelao » Logged
jani
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« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2006, 08:26:50 AM »
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Pelao; excellent points.

Personally, I have a fondness for the simplicity of the GNU toolsets (or similar Unix toolsets), particularly find or locate piped through xargs and/or grep. With careful naming of files, it's possible to do easy searches. If you add the use of programs such as jhead to extract EXIF data, it's possible to sort found images by e.g. aspect ratio (a feature someone requested on a Norwegian forum). The imagination is the limit.

If that looks like gobbledeegook to most people, that's a shame.
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