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Author Topic: rubber stamping backs of photos?  (Read 9756 times)
tshort
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« on: January 05, 2006, 11:01:26 AM »
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I'm looking at getting a stamp made so I can put my name/logo on backs of photos.  I print on an Epson using mostly glossy and lustre photo stocks.  Wondering whether the ink in a standard ink pad will work, or whether I'd need something else.  Anyone have any advice based on their experience with this?  Thanks.
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-T
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paulbk
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« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2006, 04:43:09 PM »
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I preprint a few sheets of Avery self-stick (peel-off) 2x4 inch address labels. I do the label printing on a regular HP deskjet (1220C), nothing fancy. Each label has my name and contact info. and some space for a short note or signature. Whenever I sell a print I stick a label in the center of the back of the print. It interferes with nothing and they know how to contact me in the future.

Avery makes some nice labels using good inkjet paper able to take color. Take a look at Avery #8253, 2x4 inch labels. 10 labels to a sheet. Works for me.

paul
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paul b. kramarchyk
Barkhamsted, Connecticut, USA
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« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2006, 09:18:59 PM »
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In our experience stamping inks are pretty specific about which "papers" they will work on.  Drying times to non-smear condition are long, sometimes impossibly so, with anything really smooth or plastic.  Fiber papers are okay.  Like Paul, we have resorted to labels.  They end up looking neater and more professional in the bargain, for our tastes anyway.
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mikeseb
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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2006, 09:39:58 PM »
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Quote
In our experience stamping inks are pretty specific about which "papers" they will work on.  Drying times to non-smear condition are long, sometimes impossibly so, with anything really smooth or plastic.  Fiber papers are okay.  Like Paul, we have resorted to labels.  They end up looking neater and more professional in the bargain, for our tastes anyway.
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Is there any concern, for those images that matter THAT much, about the effect on archival qualities of such labels?

I recognize that this concern is overblown in many cases.
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michael sebastian
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« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2006, 11:34:38 PM »
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I'm on the road using a borrowed computer so I can't give you the name and model #, but we get our labels from Light Impressions and print them on our normal photo printer.  On the backs of photos we aren't so concerned about labels fading as we are about the potential for nonarchival papers, adhesives and inks to damage a print.
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2006, 11:35:47 PM »
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As long as the label uses non-acidic materials, the print will be fine long-term. On that note, I have not researched the matter to deeply and don't know of any labels that fit that bill...
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paulbk
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« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2006, 03:26:39 AM »
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High quality acid-free archival labels and pens/ink are available. Search Google..
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paul b. kramarchyk
Barkhamsted, Connecticut, USA
tshort
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« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2006, 04:40:38 PM »
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I appreciate the comments/input on this.  I've made an each-way bet - just went to Office Depot and picked up some Avery clear mailing labels - number 15660, for use in a laser printer.  I then opened up MS Word, inserted my rubber stamp design (.jpg file), resized it down a bit, and printed it onto a sheet of the labels.  Worked really well - quality is excellent, and the label itself has a high quality feel to it.  I then stuck these onto the backs of prints that I had done for a client.  Nice.

I also ordered up a rubber stamp that includes my logo and text, all stored as a single jpg layout.  $25, for a 1.75"x3.5" stamp.  Inkwise the stamp guy said to try a Micropore inkpad, which I bought at Office Depot for $3.  If that doesn't work - smearage, or slo/no drying - then they make an ink designed specificially for using on photos.  Has a high alcohol content and dries very quickly (30 secs).  But...it's spendy ($20+ for the "kit"), and you need to condition it between uses, I think.  Sounds painful.  So if the micropore pad doesn't work, then I'll just use the stamp for large envelopes and matte/fibre prints, and use my avery labels for the other stuff.

BTW, here is where I ordered my stamp from: http://www.crstamp.com/index.html  The guy I worked with on the phone was very knowledgeable and helpful - would recommend to anyone who wants to get a stamp made.
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-T
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jani
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« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2006, 07:43:23 AM »
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Interesting thread.

I figured that for matte papers, I'd be using a regular pencil to sign with. The graphite has excellent archival quality.

But putting my contact info on a sticker on the back of the print seems really smart, too.

The contact info's archival qualities isn't really important.

In 60 to 300 years, my phone numbers and address will most certainly have changed at least once.
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Jan
Geoff Wittig
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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2006, 10:14:35 PM »
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I sign prints just outside the image area with a graphite pencil at lower right, with the print title hand-lettered at lower left. (I've tried inserting a title and signature using an attractive italic typeface in a corner of the image with Photoshop's text tool; this looks classy, but seems a bit too intrusive.)
I also include a printed "colophon", printed on an acid-free index card. This describes the paper and inkset used together with Wilhelm's estimated print longevity and recommendations for care of the print, plus contact information.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2006, 10:15:54 PM by Geoff Wittig » Logged
framah
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« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2006, 12:41:40 PM »
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Here is a little info from the framing side of the picture.  Those labels on the back  of the photo are a real PIA!!.  When a photo is  to be mounted down, the label will show thru to the front as a raised area. Most all of the framers I know resort to peeling the label off so it doesn't show thru.  

Most photos you sell aren't works of art so they get mounted down to foam core or something else. The real high quality ones are mounted archivally but then you sign and number the front somewhere and you wouldn't put a sticker on it because of the adhesives on the sticker.

 No matter what a company says about the archivalness of the adhesive on their product, the first rule of archivally mounting anything is that the process must be reversable which means no adhesives as the chemicals will migrate into the paper.

If you must put a label on the back, please do not put it in the middle of the paper!!!  Put it as near the edge as possible. This way the border of the photo paper along with the mat covering the edge of the photo should cover the label when it telegraphs thru.

Following this logic then, a rubber stamp would solve that. Just put it along the edge as well.
   
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mikeseb
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« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2006, 07:15:46 PM »
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A timely topic, as I'm looking for a way to mark the backs of my prints with some distinctive mark like a logo, as well as file, year, and serial no. information, and a place for initials or signature.

tshort, thanks for the link to the stamp company. Geoff, I'm with you about the intrusiveness of built-in signatures. I experimented with this also, but it just screamed to me "digital manipulation!!" and lessened the impact of the B&W images I usually make. I do the (hard-lead, very faint) pencil signature at lower right like you do, with only the year and serial number at lower left.

Along the same lines, has anyone heard of a "chop"? This as I understand it is a printmaker's device that is used to unobtrusively but distinctively mark the edge of a fine print (eg lithograph, etc) with the printmaker's distinctive mark, like a Chinese character or whatever. This is a nice idea for photographs if one can get the device made; perhaps the linked stamp-pad maker can do this.

Another idea would be to emboss the "chop" on the edge of the print outside the image area revealed by the mat. I've not found any embosser online other than those relatively large round ones used for "Ex Libris" and notary stamps, however.

Any other ideas?
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michael sebastian
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tshort
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« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2006, 05:18:46 PM »
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I like the idea of a Chinese Chop - did a quick search on ebay and found a place that will custom make one for about $50.

My rubber stamp arrived today - very happy with quality.  Now to experiment with how well it works on various papers - and most importantly, does it bleed through?
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-T
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tshort
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« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2006, 06:12:03 PM »
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Here is a shot of the stamp on paper.  The variations in density are not in the stamp itself - came out that way - which is just the effect I wanted anyway.  

Bad news is the ink is not drying on the back of my photo paper (epson glossy; and Brilliant Lustre), so I may have to try some other inks.


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« Last Edit: January 12, 2006, 06:13:00 PM by tshort » Logged

-T
Wisconsin
paulbk
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« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2006, 04:05:40 PM »
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Re: back labels screw-up mounting by slightly “raising” the label portion

My Printer: Epson 4000 using factory Ultrachrome Pigment Ink

In my experience a 2x4 inch paper label on the back of 308g paper (Hahn. rag) is not a problem. I can see where it might be a problem with lighter paper.

fyi.. They also make archival foil back labels. No chance of bleed. But I’ve not had a problem with bleed using good quality labels printed with HP 1220C deskjet.

I’d do a few tests using a stamp. I think matte paper may bleed through to the front side. YMMV.
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paul b. kramarchyk
Barkhamsted, Connecticut, USA
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