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Author Topic: Portable Storage  (Read 3284 times)
Hank
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« on: January 09, 2006, 10:32:54 AM »
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Has anyone tried this?

I'm currently using the Epson P2000, but a friend pointed out this alternative.  I'm not affiliated with the company, rather we need an additional device and this looks promising.
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jani
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2006, 11:18:38 AM »
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This is not really an alternative to the Epson P2000, because the P2000 comes with a large (3.8", if I recall correctly) and bright display where you can preview the RAW thumbnails, JPEGs, videos and listen to music, while the Compactdrive is only storage.

If what you're after is only the portable storage, then there are several alternatives to the P2000 (40 GB) or P4000 (80 GB) out there, several of them which are probably very useful.

I have no direct experience with this particular product, so I'm not making any claims regarding how well suited it is to its task.
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Jan
Hank
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« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2006, 11:24:41 AM »
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Thanks Jani.

I seldom use the viewing screen on the P2000, so that's not an issue.  I'm attracted by its apparent (or claimed) battery life, use of AA batteries, and claimed download speed.  As we use portable storage, there simply isn't time or opportunity to view images in the field, so we do our viewing on the desktop back at the studio.
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2006, 04:25:06 PM »
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I use one and it works very well.  My version is FAT16, which I believe limits the file size or number of files storable.  The new ones are FAT32.

Cheap and simple.

Peter
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DaveLon
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« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2006, 04:26:43 PM »
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Quote
Thanks Jani.

I seldom use the viewing screen on the P2000, so that's not an issue.  I'm attracted by its apparent (or claimed) battery life, use of AA batteries, and claimed download speed.  As we use portable storage, there simply isn't time or opportunity to view images in the field, so we do our viewing on the desktop back at the studio.
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I have not used this version but I did try and use an earlier one and it was slow, went through AAs much too quickly and left me very disappointed. This newer model may be better but I would want to try it out before purchasing.

Dave S
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jani
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« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2006, 04:48:12 PM »
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I have not used this version but I did try and use an earlier one and it was slow, went through AAs much too quickly and left me very disappointed. This newer model may be better but I would want to try it out before purchasing.
Well, there are limits to how energy efficient these things can be. A harddisk uses power.

I'm not entirely satisfied with the battery performance of the Epson P2000 myself, but it's enough to copy a few CF cards, and it lasted me long enough to give me a chance to recharge it while I was going from hotel to hotel in the far east.

But the P2000 wouldn't cut it for an intense shoot in the wilderness without some backup power, such as the Digital Camera Battery (http://digitalcamerabattery.com, if I'm not mistaken).

So, how quickly is "much too quickly", and did you try to use rechargeable batteries (e.g. GP's 2500 series or better)?
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Jan
Tim Gray
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« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2006, 05:23:58 PM »
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I've been researching a new PSD for a few months now, and yesterday ordered a 100 gig from here: http://hyperdrive.com/shop/index.php  - which is basically the same device Hank referenced.  There's been a string of very favourable comments on DPR.

Viewing the files on the device isn't important to me.

I like the AA batteries and very fast performance.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2006, 07:54:13 AM by Tim Gray » Logged
rvaubel
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« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2006, 11:53:52 PM »
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I have the P-4000 x 80G and find it very useful for downloading my 2 and 4G CF cards in the field. I can get about 12G's before I have to switch batteries. And here is the trick.... you can make a accessary AA battery pack  with about 5$ worth of parts from Radio Shack! For the true geek, their are people who have upgraded the HD with 100G x 7400rpm unit which reduces access time significiently. Search to "Epson P2000" on Goggle Video beta (you may have to download the beta, I cant rememberhow I got it) and you will find a 30min video on the step by step procedure. I'm waiting for the release of the new 120G drives before I upgrade mine. BTW the video shows you how to put the old drive in an alum case to create a 80G keychange HD ! No screen, but hay, whatayawant for 5$.
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Mark Graf
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2006, 06:23:35 PM »
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I just got the 80 GB version of the PD70x as a field backup + emergency storage to my Epson P2000.   Its interface is a bit clunky, but seems to do the job ok.  I haven't made any speed tests, but it downloaded a 4GB card "pretty quick."
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