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Author Topic: panoramic software  (Read 6733 times)
Peter McLennan
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« on: February 10, 2003, 01:34:52 PM »
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Photovista was heavily discounted recently.  Should be around $50US, mebbe less.  Excellent intro to stitching. Very easy to use, good results.

Peter
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gwarrellow
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« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2003, 02:04:48 PM »
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Take a look at this table at the excellent Panoguide site comparing the various software available:

http://www.panoguide.com/software/compare_stitch.html#3
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Gianni
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« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2003, 11:10:21 AM »
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I use Panorama Factory for all my pano photos and I'm very happy. The software it easy to use and the final image it's of very high quality. I usually stich 10 shots and the final image is about 200 Mbytes. There's some limit too. For example you can stich only one row of picture and you cannot tilt (up or down) your camera. I agree with "gwarrellow"  about to visit panoguide.com.

Ciao Gianni.
http://ww.widepicture.com
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2003, 05:54:03 PM »
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How many source images in the comp?

Peter
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PaulHolman
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« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2003, 01:03:00 AM »
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Another vote for The Panorama Factory and the panoguide site here!

For really good results use TPF to "bend" the individual pictures, then assemble by hand in Photoshop to prevent any blurs where they join.

Another cheap way to do this is using Helmut Dersch's Panorama tools plug ins for Photoshop, but it's a little bit more "techy".

For some examples of stiched panoramas have a look at www.paulholman.com/vr1.htm

Hope this helps

Paul Holman
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Vuthy
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« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2003, 01:48:56 PM »
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I have posted some panoramic photos at Photo-Direct.net/pano :laugh:
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raven1
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« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2003, 12:45:27 PM »
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Would like to start doing panoramic photos with the stitch type programs using my EOS V1 (with a 50mm lens and tripod), any suggestions on software that’s user friendly but powerful enough to do a good job, and of course a friendly price tag.
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Ken Dunham
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« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2003, 01:47:48 PM »
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Adobe's Photoshop Elements (U$99 list) has a stitch function (unlike the much mre expensive full Photoshop).
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jeffreybehr
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« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2003, 10:44:45 AM »
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Raven, I'm very pleased with Panavue Image Assembler.  It will stitch vertically as well as horizontally, and it's flexible enough with lens selections and creation, choices of overlap, etc., so that it will do good composites where others won't.

Panorama Factory is one I tried extensively before rejecting it.
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flash
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« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2003, 05:29:30 PM »
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Slightly related but.....

I'm trying to find a stiching program that I can use to rejoin two halves of a Xpan tranny scanned on a 35mm scanner. So far I either get heaps of distortion or blur along the join, or the program crops of the corners, thinking the stitch is from two images rotated around a nodal point. I know PS works and it is what I am using. I was just wondering if there is something out there that can spped this up that actually works.

So far I have used Panorama Factory, Panorama Maker and a demo of Panaview. None have been truely acceptable.

Gordon
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Doug_Dolde
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« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2003, 06:01:17 PM »
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PS Elements works good if you're just doing straight splicing with no perspective correction needed.  I have used it for stitching two halves of a 4x5 scan.
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jdemott
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« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2003, 07:11:53 PM »
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For "flash" re blending 2 halves of Xpan scan:

A shortcut for aligning the two halves in Photoshop is to bring the two halves into Photoshop as separate layers.  Set the blend mode of the upper layer to difference.  Move the upper layer until you see the overlap area go completely black (I assume you have some overlap).  The black will tell you that the pixels in the overlap area are perfectly lined up (i.e., there is no difference between the pixels above and the pixels below).  Change the blend mode back to normal.  Do a quick pass of a large soft edged brush in the layer mask along the seam to hide any transition glitches and you're done.  You can then merge the layers and make whatever adjustments you like.  Overall, I think this would be faster than trying to deal with a separate stitching program, no matter how well it worked.
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John DeMott
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« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2003, 08:30:30 AM »
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I have been using PanoSticher (less than $30 US) for a couple of months now. It is so easy to use and effective that, if you don't need spheric pananorams, why should you pay more for the other software.
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