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Author Topic: Tripod Strap  (Read 3843 times)
61Dynamic
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« on: January 14, 2006, 09:10:04 PM »
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Over the holiday season I acquired a Gitzo Explorer 2220 and Ultimate Ballhead. Tripod shooting is relatively new to me as I've never had a decent tripod before. The 2220 is nice and light and there is enough space between legs for me to just hold it, but I do like to have my hands free when walking about for those spur of the moment shots. Being able to throw my tripod across my back like a samurai sword would be sweet, but by the looks of things that isn't really an option...

I've looked at what's available from Gitzo and BH but am wondering if anyone using tripods more extensively (which many here do) has any recommendations for a strap. What's the most comfortable? Easiest to use? Or, are they all pretty much the same?
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mikeseb
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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2006, 09:32:28 PM »
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Over the holiday season I acquired a Gitzo Explorer 2220 and Ultimate Ballhead. Tripod shooting is relatively new to me as I've never had a decent tripod before. The 2220 is nice and light and there is enough space between legs for me to just hold it, but I do like to have my hands free when walking about for those spur of the moment shots. Being able to throw my tripod across my back like a samurai sword would be sweet, but by the looks of things that isn't really an option...

I've looked at what's available from Gitzo and BH but am wondering if anyone using tripods more extensively (which many here do) has any recommendations for a strap. What's the most comfortable? Easiest to use? Or, are they all pretty much the same?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=56003\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I've used one quite a bit; I had a bogen model for an old monstrously heavy aluminum tripod, forget which model. It screwed into a threaded hole at the tripod leg junction (? term for this) and had a strap that buckled around the legs of the closed tripod, just above the feet. It was that springy padded rubber stuff. Ditto the next one, for my GItzo 1548--an Op/Tech strap that buckles around the head and feet.

They are all awkward. There won't be any quick deployments a la Crouching Photographer, Hidden Subject, as one has to unbuckle, set down, open up, position, etc. They do at least free one's hands for the other tonnage s/he must carry.

When I traveled last fall with the gitzo i put in in a large duffel bag surrounded by clothes, and checked the lot on the plane. No problem. Tripod bags have always seemed to me an expensive solution in want of a problem.
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michael sebastian
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francois
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« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2006, 03:18:35 AM »
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I simply use a piece of tubular webbing (here). The Op/Tech USA is possibly a cleaner way but here Op/Tech products are 3x more expensive than in the US. I've also been using a ThinkTank tripod bag. A bag is nice to protect a tripod or to carry between locations but when I'm shooting I use the strap method only.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2006, 03:20:32 AM by francois » Logged

Francois
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« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2006, 04:15:57 AM »
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I have two tripods: a G1228 with Acratech, and a G1348 with Graf Studioball.

The G1228 lives in a flimsy nylon bag which came from a cheap (and useless!) plastic tripod I owned a decade ago. The plastic piece of junk was tossed years back, but the bag (much mended with gaffer tape) goes on. Has a strap which fits over my shoulder, and the bag itself weighs nothing. Of course, it has no padding either!

The G1348 is placed into a green canvas cover which came with some umbrellas for the garden my wife bought a little while back. I'd just got the G1348, and wanted something to carry it in. These came to mind, and indeed, the tripod fits in nicely. For some reason the manufacturer placed a strap along the length of the bag, so again, it can be slung over the shoulder. Weight, agian, is negligible, and indeed I often carry both, since I like to use both my MF and LF kit simultaneously. (I do plan to replace the Studioball with another Acratech when I can to make this even easier).

Both bags cost me nothing; both weigh next to nothing; neither scream "valuable item!".  On the downside, neither is waterproof, and they have no padding to protect the tripods from knocks. Since I'm normally quite careful with my kit, this is not a problem for me.
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Just one more frame, dear...
Hank
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« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2006, 11:16:04 AM »
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I gave up on straps after using them for years.  They tangle, and the exposed tripod is always hanging on brush and stuff when it's on your back.

I quit using straps the first time I tried a tripod bag with shoulder strap.  It keeps your tripod from hanging on stuff, plus it protects the tripod during transport.  If you select an unpadded variety, they fold up to almost nothing when not in use.  In the field I hang mine from the center column of the erected tripod, adding rocks if I want more stability in the wind or with long lenses.

There are probably others, but I've never had reason to use anything but the Tamrac I first bought.  They come in three sizes, have a carry handle as well as a shoulder strap, plus a zippered pocket for accessories and such.  Don't remember what they cost, but it's not much.
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pcox
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« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2006, 04:55:48 AM »
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Another alternative is to buy a camera bag with a tripod holder. I have a LowePro Mini Trekker AW, which has one. You can see it here: http://www.lowepro.com/Products/Backpacks/...Trekker_AW.aspx - the 4th alternate view shows the tripod holder in use.

Basically you fit two of the tripod legs in a flip-down pocket at the bottom of the bag, and strap the middle and top of it in place with bungee cords. Works a charm, although you do feel a bit back-heavy, since your center of gravity is pretty far back with all that weight out there.

That's my .02...

Cheers,
Peter
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Peter Cox Photography
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jani
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« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2006, 06:46:32 AM »
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Another alternative is to buy a camera bag with a tripod holder. I have a LowePro Mini Trekker AW, which has one. You can see it here: http://www.lowepro.com/Products/Backpacks/...Trekker_AW.aspx - the 4th alternate view shows the tripod holder in use.
Yep, that was fun until my tripod head caught in some overhead branches -- while I was on horseback.

There are downsides to many carrying methods.
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Jan
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« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2006, 08:21:44 AM »
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Oof! At least your camera equipment cushioned your fall  

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Yep, that was fun until my tripod head caught in some overhead branches -- while I was on horseback.

There are downsides to many carrying methods.
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Peter Cox Photography
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« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2006, 10:45:54 AM »
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Oof! At least your camera equipment cushioned your fall 
I was lucky in that I discovered what happened before it was too late; we were going at a very leisurely pace. So I just ended up leaning backwards a lot and getting help with untangling the branches.

It had me worried for a few seconds, though. Breaking arms and whatnot in rural China doesn't strike me as particularly clever.
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Jan
61Dynamic
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« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2006, 11:56:42 AM »
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There won't be any quick deployments a la Crouching Photographer, Hidden Subject...[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

   I'm jealous. I wish I came up with that line.


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Another alternative is to buy a camera bag with a tripod holder. I have a LowePro Mini Trekker AW, which has one. You can see it here: [a href=\"http://www.lowepro.com/Products/Backpacks/allWeather/Mini_Trekker_AW.aspx]http://www.lowepro.com/Products/Backpacks/...Trekker_AW.aspx[/url] - the 4th alternate view shows the tripod holder in use.

Basically you fit two of the tripod legs in a flip-down pocket at the bottom of the bag, and strap the middle and top of it in place with bungee cords. Works a charm, although you do feel a bit back-heavy, since your center of gravity is pretty far back with all that weight out there.

That's my .02...

Cheers,
Peter
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=56046\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
I also have that backpack. Cant say I'm fond of that way of carrying a tripod for the mentioned reasons.


Thanks for the opinions. I'll be picking up a basic strap with my next equipment purchase.
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