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Author Topic: 2nd Photoshoot with flash  (Read 2693 times)
saiine
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« on: January 31, 2006, 05:20:16 PM »
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Hey all, thanks for all the great help and recommendations while I shot my gf and her sisters. Some of the pics are available on my blog and I'm working on getting the rest up.

I shot a friend and her fiance this weekend. I'm still really uncomfortable with the flash. In terms of what the zoom does, knowing how much to use while not blowing out the background or the person, etc. I'm sure these are all newbie questions and it will just take training. Someone mentioned setting up a pepsi can and constantly shooting that in various light conditions while changing flash settings.

Anyway, I wanted to get critisicm on these, http://www.shanejmontgomery.com/rosie

These were all shot between 4:30 - 6:00. Particularly on the shots of their faces together I'd like some feedback on as I find getting good exposure is difficult.

My personal opinion. I think these are ok for my second attempt, but they certiantly dont jump out at me.

As always, your comments and feedback are appreciated, please be as tough on me as possible

Shane
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boku
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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2006, 05:29:58 PM »
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Anyway, I wanted to get critisicm on these, http://www.shanejmontgomery.com/rosie

These were all shot between 4:30 - 6:00. Particularly on the shots of their faces together I'd like some feedback on as I find getting good exposure is difficult.

My personal opinion. I think these are ok for my second attempt, but they certiantly dont jump out at me.

As always, your comments and feedback are appreciated, please be as tough on me as possible

saiine,

Nice progress!

Now next thing you want to consider - leave the constraints of the rigid 3:2 aspect ratio behind. Shoot with a specific crop in mind, regardless of the native aspect ratio of the sensor. When you fire up your computer afterwards, crop that image to suit!

Another liberating trick - try verticals as well as horizontals. Mix it up. Soon you will get an inate feel for what works.

Keep 'em comin!
« Last Edit: January 31, 2006, 05:30:59 PM by boku » Logged

Bob Kulon

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Play it Straight and Play it True, my Brother.
saiine
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« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2006, 05:52:03 PM »
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Thanks man,

Can you extrapolate on the 3:2 aspect ratio? I'm not sure if I understand completely. Are you saying, if I want perhaps the couple to fill 80% of the frame, then to shoot them at 80% of the frame?

To be honest, I wasn't paying as much attention as setup or pose as I was the lighting. I was basically bracketing and trying different combinations. Most of those were shot on my 70-200 f4 L, and 17-40 f4 L, both at F4 with various shutter speeds with the flash. The shutter speed and flash is what I was really battling. I wanted to leave the shutter open just long enough to not overblow the background, but I needed to knock my flash down to not over expose the subjects.

It's a road of work I have ahead - but please keep the comments coming.

Quote
saiine,

Nice progress!

Now next thing you want to consider - leave the constraints of the rigid 3:2 aspect ratio behind. Shoot with a specific crop in mind, regardless of the native aspect ratio of the sensor. When you fire up your computer afterwards, crop that image to suit!

Another liberating trick - try verticals as well as horizontals. Mix it up. Soon you will get an inate feel for what works.

Keep 'em comin!
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boku
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« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2006, 10:42:01 AM »
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Can you extrapolate on the 3:2 aspect ratio? I'm not sure if I understand completely. Are you saying, if I want perhaps the couple to fill 80% of the frame, then to shoot them at 80% of the frame?

The 3:2 aspect ratio refers to the shape of the rectangular image. For horizontal shots, this means 3 pixels wide for every 2 pixels tall. This DSLR standard has been inherited from 35mm film: 36mm x 24mm.

It doesn't work for everything. Cropping the long side can make it less drastic and enhance the image if the far margins contain distracting information.
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Bob Kulon

Oh, one more thing...
Play it Straight and Play it True, my Brother.
Sheldon N
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2006, 01:26:50 PM »
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I find them technically quite good. Exposures, color, compostion etc are all pleasing. The only thing you could potentially add to your bag of tricks is to try a warming gel in front of the flash - especially for the backlit sunset shots. It will help to match the relatively cold color of the flash to the warmer sunset.

The main thing that stands out to me in the photos is something I'm working on in my own shooting - a lack of emotion or connection with the subject. I think it's partially helping people to be at ease in front of the camera, and in directing the tone of what's happening in the shoot.

It's hard to get that nailed down, but when there's an emotional connection with the subject in the photograph it really stands out. Hard to explain - more of a "I know it when I see it" kind of thing.

Hope this makes some sense....

Sheldon
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saiine
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« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2006, 04:01:41 PM »
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Indeed it does Sheldon, and I appreciate that. The part of directing subjects is something I'm adapting too. To be honest, I felt very outgoing and comfortable that day.

So as I began to ask them to hop on eachothers shoulders and play around, act like I wasn't there. They were extremely shy and non expressive.

When I asked them to kiss, a kiss on the cheek is all I got, mainly because of religious purposes. These 2 people are highly religious and although are getting married, I guess they haven't kissed or something?

They are not super close friends, and I rarely see them.

I'll learn over time how to deal with situations like that. It's difficult though

Quote
I find them technically quite good. Exposures, color, compostion etc are all pleasing. The only thing you could potentially add to your bag of tricks is to try a warming gel in front of the flash - especially for the backlit sunset shots. It will help to match the relatively cold color of the flash to the warmer sunset.

The main thing that stands out to me in the photos is something I'm working on in my own shooting - a lack of emotion or connection with the subject. I think it's partially helping people to be at ease in front of the camera, and in directing the tone of what's happening in the shoot.

It's hard to get that nailed down, but when there's an emotional connection with the subject in the photograph it really stands out. Hard to explain - more of a "I know it when I see it" kind of thing.

Hope this makes some sense....

Sheldon
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